Very highly recommend this trail as an excursion from Page/Lake Powell or as a pitstop along US-89 between Page, Arizona, and Kanab, Utah. The Wahweap Hoodoos are some of the most beautiful, most otherworldly rock formations I’ve ever seen. I was inspired to check them out after visiting the nearby Toadstool Hoodoos last year and found myself wanting more, as they were cool, but a little underwhelming.

I stopped off at the BLM’s Big Water Visitor Center on the south side of US-89 to get a paper copy of the trail map. They have an iPad there with pictures that they can show you so you can get a feel for the trail and things to look out for before heading out.

It was fairly easy finding parking at the 2WD spot before the dirt road crosses Wahweap Creek—do NOT attempt in a sedan as there is mud and sand. From the 2WD parking lot to the fence was a ~15-20 minute walk. It’s no longer a “hanging” fence as it has been repaired and now there are multiple gates where you just have to lift up metal loops to release the gate and squeeze by. Just make sure to close the gate behind you as you are entering a Wilderness Study Area.

The hike is fairly easy to follow with minimal routefinding required; simply follow the footsteps and head upstream through Wahweap Creek. When I visited over Veterans Day weekend, there was little water flowing in the creek and small patches of mud here and there, but I can imagine during the summer monsoon this will be much heavier.

The hoodoos themselves are on a parcel of the cliffs on the south/western banks of the creek reached ~2 hours into the hike, so stick to that side of the creek. You really can’t miss them as one of the bright white hoodoos is visible halfway through the hike. Make sure to explore the initial hoodoos on the cliffside, the second grouping inside the alcove area, and then the third, most beautiful collection of hoodoos on the other side of the cliffs…just keep walking and you’ll find them.

I met maybe half a dozen other folks doing the hike that day. I started at 11am and was one of the last heading out to the hoodoos.

The hike to the hoodoos took me 2 hours, and I spent ~1 hour exploring them and having lunch I brought with me. The hike back to the car felt much much faster (perhaps it was slightly downhill?) but it was still 2 hours going back, for a total of 5 hours hiking time.

Bring lots of water (2-4 liters depending on the temperature) and a hat/sunscreen. In November I wore long underwear base layers beneath jeans that kept me comfortable, so plan accordingly.