Reviews (357)
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Recordings (274)
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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarNovember 21, 2020

Long bumpy ride, short hike, incredibly beautiful spot. I would rate the trail moderate in difficulty. From time to time it runs through the creek bed with hard to spot exits. Without GPS, it is easy to walk up the wrong wash hiking out. Don’t depend on the boot prints!

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Maria West reviewed Harris Wash
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarNovember 6, 2020
Hiking
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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarOctober 27, 2020
Hiking
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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarOctober 26, 2020
Scramble
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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarOctober 26, 2020
BackpackingGreat!Muddy

We loved this trail. We slept near the arch and enjoyed some beautiful weather. Would give 5 stars for the hike but the two hour drive on Hole in the Rock road was brutal.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarOctober 20, 2020
Hiking

This is an amazing adventure as a day hike or as an overnight backpack trip. However it is not an easy trip. It is about 15 miles round-trip and requires a significant amount of effort walking through sand. We started out at the Coyote parking lot and walked to the confluence where we dropped down through the crack in the rock and down the long sandy declined to the river bottom. We then followed the river upstream and exited out at Jacob Hamlin Arch. (This is the counter-clockwise route) There was no fixed rope at the exit but we were able to scramble up by helping each other. If you are not comfortable with very steep rock climbing this might be tricky without a rope. Also if you are carrying a heavy backpack a light rope for lifting the backpacks might be helpful. Once at the top of the rock climb out of the canyon there are a few Cairns placed to help you find your way but to find a direct line back to your vehicle at the parking you need to route find for about 3-4 miles along the rim of the canyon. We used our gps tracking on Strava to help us stay right on track and back to the truck. This way we avoided walking in sand for the majority of the walk out. Note: the Hole in the Rock road is very washboard and will rattle your vehicle for more than 40 miles. A sturdy 4WD vehicle is best. Also, after you turn on Forty Mile road going East, there are 4 sections of deep sand where only high clearance vehicles can get through. The ruts are 12-20 inches deep and the sand is very soft. Several vehicles have gotten stuck and had to be pulled out. There were many vehicles parked before the first sand bog. Doing the canyon from this starting point will add about 8 miles. Hopefully if you have to park there, you could hitch I ride from someone with a bigger vehicle. Overall, this is an amazing and wonderfully beautiful hike. Plenty of unbelievable arches, vistas, scenery, and fun. Tough to get to but we’ll worth the planning and effort.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarOctober 20, 2020
BackpackingGreat!

anyone planning to backpack Coyote Gulch on 11/13-14? we are looking for someone to carpool and/or share the cost of a 4WD rental. contact me at matilde_d86

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Ken Caldwell reviewed Hole in the Rock Trail
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarOctober 11, 2020

Probably not a hike some would enjoy, but I loved the history on display, along with the views from atop. Don’t underestimate how tough this can be in the summer heat!

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarOctober 4, 2020

Great hike all the way into October. Definitely descend into the canyon at the Crack in the wall/confluence and out at Jacob Hamblin arch. I learned that lesson the first time. That slog out of the canyon in the sand uphill after a long day's hike is miserable. Then once you get up and over the Crack... more sand! I'll be going the opposite direction this weekend.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 29, 2020
Hiking

This trail is HARD. If Angels Landing in Zion is rated hard, this is harder.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 27, 2020
HikingGreat!No shadeOver grown

I went this route, but in reverse. We descended from Jacob Hamblin Arch and ascended on crack in the wall. I don't recommend this. We did this because we got a shuttle that we couldn't refuse. BUT going up the 600+ elevation on a hot sand dune to get to the crack in the wall was sooooo difficult on the last leg of our journey. After that ascent I hate sand more than anything on the planet. However, the view from crack in the wall is amazing. Better than horse shoe bend, better than grand canyon south rim. That view is close to spiritual. The whole coyote gulch feels like a sacred place. This hike is my favorite hike. Ever. All 13 miles was worth every painful step. I felt more like a pilgrim than a hiker.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 26, 2020
Hiking

Incredible! It was a very hot Labor Day weekend (100 degrees) which meant less folks down in the canyon (yay!) but a dangerous final ascent and hike back to our car. We parked at the water tower. We had a rented Jeep and barely made it through the two sand pits on the road and were told they regularly tow ($1,000 from Bryce Canyon) folks from that spot. So exhilarating to make it through though! I went fast and managed to not get stuck. Quite a few folks we saw on the trail turned around and decided to do the hike via Hurricane Wash adding 9 miles. The ranger recommended we get cardboard from the dumpster by the RV park in case we got stuck in sand and needed traction- we grabbed some as she said but didn’t need it. We brought a 100 foot climbing rope and there was no rope there when we got there. We did have to search for the triangular shaped natural anchor, but as a ranger told us, that anchor has significantly declined over the years with erosion. We had two 70 year old active dads who are not climbers, and the descent was difficult and the ascent nearly impossible (one afraid of heights). We were the only rope up all weekend and lots of folks (families with 4 year olds even) used it. The 2 miles in the sand and up and over the rocks to the canyon is harder than it looks on GPS and ten times harder when hot. Don’t forget to look for the “white eagle!” Even then the cairns were important for us to find the drop in. Once in, definitely head left first to check out Jacob Hamblin arch and the incredible natural spring coming out of the rock. The water was easily filterable all along the way as we turned right and camped just 2 miles further at Coyote Arch all to ourselves. The next day we went to Cliff Arch and the two waterfalls/pools after it. We turned around as we got a late start and didn’t want to risk coming back from Stevens Arch in the dark. Several couples passed our camp in the dark from Stevens to get back to Hamlin and it’s a bit difficult in the dark IMO. The way back- we left way too late (8am) for a hot day. If you are here in 90 degree days you’ll want to start 3/4am to avoid the last two miles in the blazing heat. We spent a massive amount of energy getting our dads up the drop in in the heat - we spent all of our water and we left our dads in the shade and climbed back down with no rope, filled up 3L’s each at the spring, and then climbed back up with no rope. I rock climb and considered it quite dangerous/felt a couple times I could have slipped. The ranger showed us a perfect zig zag route that appeared much safer, but we couldn’t recreate it on our own. YMMV - 20 year olds appeared to negotiate with no problem up and down. The rangers discourage ropes and we were told they will remove them if left but ours was not removed. All of us ran out of the 3L’s undernoontime sun at 12pm on the final two miles. My husband got early signs of heat stroke and recovered at our hotel that evening without the hospital but was in pretty bad shape. Leave plenty of extra water, Gatorade, snacks in your car for the way back - assume you might get stuck and plan for it! Overall - dangerous on the weekend we chose but an incredible trip!

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarSeptember 23, 2020
Hiking
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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 21, 2020
HikingGreat!MuddyOff trail

Important for all — Crack in the Wall is not a crack. For various reasons, my friends and I poorly timed our hike and got to the Crack in the Wall as the sun set. We weren’t sure where the Crack was and didn’t want to climb the canyon wall at sunset with no evident crack, so we ended up spending the night in the canyon (with no gear). That said, when dawn came, we finally climbed the wall... and we got back to the trailhead. However, again, it’s not a crack. Despite sleeping in the desert with no equipment, I still recommend the hike and rate it between moderate and difficult. Also, definitely turn left after descending the Jacob Hamblin arch wall (with the rope). We thought you saw it simply from above and missed seeing arguably the most visually stunning part of Coyote Gulch.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 20, 2020
Hiking

Amazing hike!!!! But honestly evaluate your skill set before attempting this hike. We did this as a long day hike - parking at the water tank and dropping in at Jacob Hamblin Arch around 7:00 a.m. We hiked to Cliff Arch, turned around and then climbed back out at Jacob Hamblin Arch, making it back to the trailhead around 7:30 p.m. Despite most everything we read and were told (even by park rangers) we found the descent down into the canyon a fairly easy scramble without the assistance of a rope. The climb out however, would have been far more difficult (if not impossible) without the use of a rope. We are moderately experienced hikers with above average rock scrambling skills and experience. After a long day of hiking, the climb up the rock face required significantly more energy than we anticipated; especially with our packs on. Please do not attempt this climb without a rope if you do not have at least basic rock climbing skills. Also remember that you have several miles to hike back to the trailhead - uphill, in sand, through the desert - once you make it out of the canyon. Be aware of your energy reserves and your water rations so that you can make it back safely. There is zero shade outside and of the canyon so prepare yourself for this as well. This is a breathtaking hike, worth every ounce of energy we poured into it. Know your skills and your limitations and prepare yourself in advance before you hit this trail. It will NOT disappoint!!!

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 19, 2020
Hiking

A lot longer than the trail description indicates, but all was well once we got back to the ice cold beer in the truck. Finished at almost 17 miles.

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Kati Freeman reviewed Coyote Gulch Trail
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 15, 2020
HikingGreat!MuddyRocky

Oh man. What an amazing hike!! Did this a few days ago as a day hike but every other person we ran into did it as an overnight. Started at Water Tank trailhead, did the sneaker route, ended at Crack in the wall and hiked the 3 miles back from coyote trailhead to water tank. Clocked under 20 miles, but we did get lost a few times as the trail is super hard to follow counterclockwise. A few notes - definitely need AWD or 4WD to get to Water Tank trailhead. We went about 35 MPH on Hole in the Rock rd and took us about an hour to get to Forty Mile Ridge. Dropped into the gulch via the sneaker route from water tank. There are cairns to guide the way to the drop in. Definitely bring rope - it’s worth it because it’s a pretty steep descent. Ran across a few others who were stuck and needed to borrow our rope to get out. There are a few places in the rock face to tie off, but I would suggest 250 feet if you want the rope to reach the bottom. I read other reviews that said it wasn’t a hard climb but it’s definitely not easy. We only ran into one natural spring about 3/4 of the way in, so bring lots of water. I wore shorts but I’d recommend long pants - there’s a lot of brush and bamboo. This trail is entirely sand and water so be prepared with water shoes if you don’t want to walk in soggy boots. The hike from the bottom of the gulch up to Crack in the Wall is all sand! We lost the trail here and had to do a steep climb up the red hill to the main trail. And the Crack in the Wall is so hard to find going counterclockwise even with the AllTrails maps. There are cairns at the top of the hill, but not in the correct spot. Hint: look further to the right of the cairns to find the opening to Crack in the Wall. If you have a large pack you’ll need to bring extra rope to get your pack up through it. This was the hike of a lifetime. Absolutely beautiful views, waterfalls, and parts of the river were breathtaking, very diverse scenery. If you’re looking to be off the grid and find some adventure I’d recommend this hike!!

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 3, 2020
CampingGreat!

I did this trail backwards(dropped in by Jacob Hamblin Arch). The first day we hiked 8.5 miles to the last camping area almost to the Escalante River. The 2nd day we had to hike up the crazy sand hill! The teenagers and other 2 dads(both are avid hikers) did great but it was a really struggle for me. If you are going this direction make sure you have LOTS of water because once you start heading out there is nothing for 3-4 miles. Overall it was fun and I really enjoyed the trail!! There is a bathroom in the gulch so you don’t have to pack out your human waste. Water was clear and with a filter had no problems of drinking it. We parked one car at both drop spots and they saved 3 miles of walking in the desert sun.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarAugust 29, 2020
HikingNo shade

The hike was great. It was too exhausting because of the warm weather plus no shade. Make sure to bring enough liquid to make it through the whole hike.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarAugust 26, 2020
Hiking

Definitely end at the water tanks. Don’t start there. Also. You only need a 30ft rope to help lower packs. None of this 150ft nonsense. Follow gps until you’re in the gulch at the river. There are a few spots that look like the trail, but they’re not. Like when you first drop into the gulch, it looks like you should go to the right of the giant rock tower (you’ll know what I mean), but you actually need to go to the left. Save yourself the time that we wasted. It would help to start early, as the first few miles are completely exposed and the heat is brutal. But with water it’s manageable.

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Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarAugust 23, 2020
HikingScramble

Not one of my favorite hikes but take that statement with a grain of salt, because we did this hike clockwise in order to set a rope, just in case we decided to go in and out at Jacobs (there was no rope when we were there, so don’t count on one being there). A few things I wish I’d known before the hike: 1) there’s a long dune hike right after crack in the wall, so going up that wasn’t fun. 2) the trail was hard to find while in the gulch (at least going our direction) and we constantly had to search and correct ourselves. Always choose the water path if you have the choice 3) the climb at jacob’s arch is fine without a rope if you have a day pack and are an able-bodied person, but I’d recommend a fixed rope if you have a heavy backpack (climb had a positive face was < 5.5 imo). 4) the water becomes grey with clay around mile 8, if you’re going counter-clockwise. We filtered and drank it without upset stomachs, but weren’t thrilled about it. 5) the 2.5 mile walk between parking lots had no shade and was through soft sand (my outback would not have made the drive beyond the water tank and barely made it to the water tank). After a long day of hiking, this portion felt like eternity. As I said above, take this review with a grain of salt. We did this in August and backwards, so maybe it’s a completely different experience in other circumstances.

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