Looking for a great trail in Sam Houston National Forest, Texas? AllTrails has 8 great hiking trails, trail running trails, forest trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 6 moderate trails in Sam Houston National Forest ranging from 7.7 to 31.4 miles and from 173 to 426 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!

hiking

forest

running

walking

The Sam Houston National Forest is one of four National Forests in Texas. It is contained within Montgomery County, San Jacinto County, and Walker County. These counties have evidence of human occupation dating back 12 thousand years, making it an interesting historical and archeological site. The forest is located 50 miles north of Houston, making for a great weekend trip. It is also accessible from Austin, which is about a 3.5 hour drive away. The Sam Houston National Forest is a multi-use forest meaning that under the watch of the Forest Service, recreation, fish and wildlife, boating, timber, grazing, soil and water, and minerals, are all utilized so that the public can benefit from the resources and enjoy the conservation aspect as well. Summers in the forest are hot and humid and winters are relatively mild. The Lone Star Trail is in this forest, and hikers can choose from a multitude of trailheads or attempt the 128 mile through hike. There are three camping areas in the Sam Houston National Forest: Cagle Recreation Area, Double Lake and Stubblefield. Double Lake Recreation Area campsite can be reserved, but the other sites are first come first served only. Lake Livingston and Lake Conroe offer fishing and boating opportunities and swimming areas near the lake's beaches.

on Winters Bayou Trail

walking
bridge out
15 days ago

Great Dirtbike Trails a day or so after a medium rain. can be sandy but was great today

Covered the two miles from parking area (#6?) just north of FM 1375 towards Stubblefield and back. Conditions were 28 degrees (rising to 50), calm and sunny (pretty perfect). Lake is low, so no water issues. Trail is in good shape. Some hog activity, light traffic.

hiking
muddy
1 month ago

Beautiful hike with diverse forest settings. We accidentally added on an extra bit by hiking to parking lot 3 and back to the trail. Took us about 6 hours at a somewhat leisurely pace. Didn’t have to cross any water. Lots of great bridges and really very well-maintained trail with some overgrown areas.

Perfect weather. Dry. Lots of turkeys during the day, but coyotes at night. The pine trees were a good change of scenery.

hiking
bridge out
over grown
2 months ago

It's a nice trail or, it could be. They're are bridges out, some parts are over grown, and irresponsible dog owners let their dogs crap in the middle of the trail and they just leave it there for everyone to step in.

hiking
bridge out
bugs
muddy
washed out
2 months ago

hiking
3 months ago

I hiked out and back from 1725 to 945. The trail was easy to follow. I hiked in early October and there wasn’t any water on the trail. This is probably not always the case after rains and one would need to be prepared for mud and crossing water areas where bridges are out. Lots of insects all along the trail so bring insect repellant. I enjoyed the hike with several nice off trail water bodies and of course Winter Bayou.

good distance trail, pretty overgrown in most spots, lots of ducking for a trailer person. enjoyable for sure.

The only hard thing about this trail is the mileage! The rest of the hike was moderate. It was overgrown in a large portion. Well marked on the trees though.

Started this trail at 3pm, didn’t finish till almost 9. Should definitely start earlier, as I hiked for an hour and a half in the dark, and didn’t get to go through the west fork trail. The wilderness area is tight and it can be hard to keep track of the trail. I went while it was super dry and there wasn’t any flowing water, so it wasn’t too bad. All in all, a great long hike.

Some parts are a little overgrown and had to jump over a few fallen trees but overall it was a good trail with some very beautiful resting/camping points. Recommend it. Also as of Sept 1st the route you would normally take to get there from the North East ( the small little bridge that the parking spot is on) is under construction and is not available for any cars or pedestrians to go through so you’ll have to take FM 1375 so just keep that in mind.

Some areas were washed out and ready hard to pass. Lots of overgrown bushes hitting you as you walk. But it was better maintained than the first part that we did last year. We will be back.

hiking
bugs
5 months ago

It was extremely hot mid august. Lots of bugs and you have to cross a few roads. That being said, still a great walk and beautiful trees! We learned there may just might be a snake/spider along the way.

My friend and I hiked this trail yesterday. It's a well marked trail. The first half or so is well maintained and very open. You can see where they perform control burns in this area and it's makes for a very open forest view. Further into the hike the forest becomes much denser and trails become narrow. Wear long pants and long sleeves; you will come into contact with a lot of vegetation; some of that being black berry briers. The trail was decently dry even though it rained on and off all week but you can tell that it does flood in areas with heavy rain. I would suggest going on this hike when there has been no rain. You have to cross a few creeks. Some have small bridges over them, some don't. All in all it was a nice day hike.

Clocking in at about 14.5 miles, this trail was a wonderful day hike. Very well marked with aluminum blazers and great signs at the trail intersections. I would suggest starting early and taking the Little Lake Creek Loop Trail path first. I made the mistake of making that the last leg of the trail in mid afternoon, and it was about 3 miles with little shade. I ran into some volunteers who were mowing and trimming back brush, and they told me a lot of the trees burned down during a drought in that part of the trail about a decade back. It doesn't look like a wasteland, far from it actually, this section had very dense vegetation, just low, and the most birds and butterflies of the whole trail. Most of the rest of the trail was well shaded. I would suggest doing this in a figure 8 pattern with the LSHT your last leg. (LLC Loop, North Fork, hit LSHT at mile 8 and hike back to the trailhead) Somewhere along the halfway point, I thought I saw a glimpse of a boar, but I'm not entirely sure. I know they are common in this area. All in all, as good as any day hike I have taken within an hour of Houston.

hiking
bugs
over grown
7 months ago

I did this trail as part of the 14 mile loop. The SE portion was very swampy, and though I was lucky enough for it to be dry, I imagine that would've been a very wet walk if there had been any rain recently. Bugs were also a major issue in this 2mi section, though I deserved it for hiking it in June. The western and northern parts of this hike more than made up for it. Gorgeous pines, really felt out in the wilderness, though you're not too far away from civilization. The trail was a little overgrown in places, and as I mentioned in the SE portion it would've been very wet had I not happened to hike it during a relative dry spell.

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