Looking for a great trail in Prentice Cooper State Forest, Tennessee? AllTrails has 18 great hiking trails, trail running trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 9 moderate trails in Prentice Cooper State Forest ranging from 3.2 to 11.2 miles and from 1,551 to 2,024 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!

hiking

forest

nature trips

views

walking

dogs on leash

river

trail running

wildlife

kid friendly

wild flowers

Tick City! If you’re bringing your dog, would probably not. Took my dog out on the 6 mile hike to the lookout and back. Found 47 ticks on her later that night. Be careful. Luckily she is on 2 types of tick prevention. Found 2 on me. The hike itself is gorgeous and nice and easy. Love the lookout.

hiking
rocky
7 days ago

We did this as a one way, point-to-point and it was about 8.5 miles. We started at Signal Point and ended at Suck Creek Road. It was definitely a difficult hike - especially for the first 2-3 miles. The stretch from Edwards Point to the Mushroom Rock is easier and you will make much better time. There are a couple of points where I thought the trail could have been better marked. I found it a little confusing to figure out which way to go. Luckily we had printed out the trail description from CumberlandTrail.org and it guided us in the right direction. Otherwise we may have taken a wrong turn.

Overall, a great hike with uphill climbs. The path was clearly defined although fallen trees presented an obstacle and the path was very rocky at times. Still this is very doable for able-bodied hikers who don't mind getting sweaty. It was shaded the whole way. If you're the first one on the trail in the morning like me, bring a stick to clear spiderwebs, as they were terrible. A couple short sections of the trail were a little narrow due to encroaching greenery, so watch what you touch. The waterfall is dry right now, so don't go expecting to see it. All in all, it was a peaceful hike with great exercise this morning!

hiking
blowdown
over grown
17 days ago

A solid 2. This trail would best be hiked in the fall. There is really nothing all that spectacular. It really is a walk in the woods. July is a hard month to hike in Tennessee due to humidity. However, the trail is mostly shaded so that will help ‘some.’ There are a few climbs on this that make it a little more than easy as listed. It was very overgrown in sections and there were a few blow downs. The River was very loud (4th of July).

trail running
19 days ago

Killer run through a boulder strewn wooded forest with amazing views of the TN River. Mostly rolling single track with the occasional steep climb mixed in for fun. I saw no other humans but did spy quite a bit of wildlife. Do it early if you’re running in the summer cause it’s toasty. Stay GNARLY!!

trail running
19 days ago

Is this the same trail that the 10 mile Rockcreek Stump jump trail race is on?

hiking
blowdown
off trail
over grown
rocky
20 days ago

A great day hike. Went counterclockwise and was watching for around mile 2 when other hikers have mentioned losing the trail. I definitely got off trail for about half a mile or more, but there is an actual trail you're on - I guess from so many people making the wrong turn. When it looks like you're going straight after the rock hopping, you're actually making a sharp left and climbing up. My friend redid the makeshift barrier that was there to try and deter hikers from taking the wrong turn. There is even a faded sharpie arrow on a rock. Otherwise, amazing day hike. LOTS of ticks, but none latched before I flinged them away. Dried up creeks make me sad. :(

Ride-shared to TN 27 trailhead from Signal Point. $25 well spent! Gorgeous trek to Mushroom Rock, then a favorite trace along Suck Creek Gorge with ample views of TN River Gorge. Very quiet and sparsely used. Edwards Point is a great lunch over spot then tough down and up to Signal Point. Lots of rocks and mud and then scrambling at Signal Point. Lots of day users here, too. Went ahead and stopped to remove downed brush and small trees blocking trail below retirement villas. Takes a village to run a village!

Very nice hike, well shaded. Waterfall was not very active but the trail is well maintained and very easy to follow. Parking area well maintained as well.

Absolutely a blast! Feels a lot longer than the 11 miles it says, but the reward you get after making around the toe and heel of the trail makes it worth it. Near perfect campsite at McNabb, no one to bother you, in fact I didn't see a soul the entire trip. Though the views are a little obstructed off the bluffs, the rock formations you see along the way more than make up for it. Huge boulders, rocks, massive trees, pretty untouched out there. That being said, quite a lot of falling trees, heard three while sleeping in camp, and even had to climb around one on the hike out. Was wild to see a tree that big so recently downed. Lastly, bring deet. Didn't see a single mosquito the whole trip, but man the ticks were BRUTAL. All shapes and sizes. Everywhere. And honestly, I don't think they even cared about the deet. Also, fill up on water whenever you see it. McNabb has a decent creek, but if you take the long way around, I'd bring a couple liters, as you don't really see much, even if it has rained. All in all, great hike for one who is out for peace and quiet.

Online information for this area is limited and inaccurate. I will relate what I discovered upon arriving at the Cumberland Trail Trailhead parking lot. I had planned to spend 3 days backpacking the Mulin’s Cove loop trail, hoping to walk a few miles each day and camping along the way. A nice slow leisurely trip. While I was at the trailhead preparing, a Ranger arrived and gave valuable info. He said there are no maps anywhere that are correct. The best ones are on display at the trailheads but they have errors. (I will post photos of them) He encouraged me to backpack the Pot Point Trail. So I took the expert’s advice and moved to the Pot Point trailhead. Basics: You do not need a permit or check in. The Ranger said trail cleanup will soon begin and the will be adding medallions to mark the trails. Area roads close, with gates, at sundown. So if you haven’t left you are stuck for the night. Camping at designated areas only. Trail signs are scarce. Current trail blazes limited. Even with recent rain, water was almost non-existent., even at the campsites. You need to plan on carrying all the water you think you will need. The only true views are at Snoopers Rock and Ransom Hollow. Snoopers Rock you can drive to and Ransom Hollow is less then a mile from the main gravel road. The views are good and worth driving to. Raccoon Mountain overlook was a waste. If you stand on top of a rock, you can barely see the river through the trees. Pot Point has NO views. It is a pile of dirt to mark the furthest point of the trail. You have to branch off the main trail and walk a short distance to it. A complete waste of energy. Natural Bridge was a rock you walked across. No views. It’s a rock. Mileage on maps are not accurate. My GPS put the loop at over a 13 mile walk. My trip: I hiked counter clockwise. From the trailhead to Hemlock Branch Campsite is about a mile. Basic campsite. I only saw one area for camping. I spent the night at McNabb Gulf Campsite. From the trailhead to the campsite was about 4 miles and took a little over four hours to walk. There were 3 campsites scattered over 100’. No flowing water, just some small pools in the rocks. Day 2 I continued counter clockwise. While I consider the whole trail as moderate, this was the hilliest portion. I was hoping to find a campsite that was not listed to stay at for my second night. This was not to be. From the McNabb campsite back to the trailhead was 9.25 miles on my GPS. And there was nothing to see till arriving at Snoopers Rock Overlook. From Snoopers to the trailhead was .4 miles. Since I was at my car I gave up on making this a 3 day trip and went home. If I was to do this area again I would park at Cumberland Trailhead and hike northeast to North Suck Creek Campsite.

hiking
blowdown
muddy
rocky
scramble
28 days ago

This was a great trail that lead to a spectacular view, a nice river and man made dam. The trail was fairly easy to traverse, except for some downed trees and rocky sections.

Tough hike with lots of rocks which makes it slow, especially if it’s wet. Be weary of going down to the waterfall. Other reviews have mentioned it and we tried it only because we missed the sign cautioning against it. With the recent rain it made finding a sturdy footholds impossible. We turned around after falling several times. Beautiful overlooks despite the trail being poorly marked.

hiking
bugs
muddy
over grown
29 days ago

The trail would be great if it wasn’t so overgrown. There were a lot of poison ivy which caused us to stop and turn around when it was unavoidable. Parts of the trail were blocked by down trees which we had to climb over or around. The trail has potential but needs some work in the spring.

This is a pretty decent hike majority of the trail. There are lots of roots and loose boulders. Would recommend boots with good tread. Some of the views are beautiful. The portion that is closer to Rainbow Lake is more switchbacks and gravel. That part of the trail is pretty busy with people going to the water.

This loop is a very nice 10 miler through the woods. Typical south Cumberland. Rocky in spots. Some rock hopping. Lots of ups and downs. Spectacular view from snoopers rock! We hiked counter clockwise. Got off trail once- where rock hopping combined with a blaze uphill on a tree. Missed it looking down at our steps. We weren’t the first to do this because there was actually a pretty good “trail” for a bit. We found our way back and continued on. Took a little over six hours taking in our hammock break at the camp and time spent enjoying the view at snoopers. The Indian Rock House is very impressive. All in all it was a very good day. I’d recommend this hike. Take plenty of water and pack bug spray for ticks.

Very pretty but definitely difficult. I’d come back when I’m in better shape

Well it’s not 9.6 miles like the app says. And I wouldn’t recommend going counter-clockwise- it is all uphill on the backside when you are already tired. Trail is nice in most places and the overlooks are awesome.

I have actually hiked portions of this trail several times, in all seasons. Fall through early spring is best, in my opinion. By the time rhododendrons and mountain laurels are blooming in spring, you have to watch out for ticks. I found 3 on me this last time. The best views are in the Signal Point to Edwards Point portion, but you have to negotiate a little elevation change and some moderate rock gardens; rocks are small, but watch your ankles. If Edwards Point is your destination, starting at the Rainbow Lake trailhead on Ohio Ave. cuts of some distance and eliminates running into ATVs on other alternative approaches to the point. Edwards Point to Mushroom Rock is easy in terms of relatively flat terrain. Though utilizing the section from Mushroom Rock to Suck Creek adds some challenging elevation changes, it is much less scenic, and not long after Edwards Point, you are too far from the gorge rim to see much. A trail from Mushroom Rock lead back to Signal Mountain High School, which makes a nice halfway break, if you don't want to do the whole trail. Just be mindful that the trails around the school are not well marked in some instances. If you are in for the whole thing, starting at Suck Creek makes more of a climactic "finish" (remember you have to hike 8 miles back from there).

Load More