Cumberland Mountain State Park is situated on the Cumberland Plateau, a segment of the great upland, which extends from western New York to central Alabama. It is said to be the largest timbered plateau in America. This 1,720-acre park was acquired in 1938 as a project of the Farm Security Administration to provide a recreational area for some 250 families selected to homestead on the Cumberland Plateau. The Homestead Museum, located one mile from the park, depicts the Cumberland Homestead Community of the 1930's. This community built the park along with help from the CCC and WPA.

hiking
4 days ago

hiking
27 days ago

hiking
2 months ago

Trailhead was hard to find as it is not marked from the road. GPS coordinates will get you in the vicinity then just look for a wide pull off on the south side of the road to park. You will need to cross the street for the trail entrance. Along the trail is very well marked with white plaques and well maintained so had no problems following it once I found the start. Beautiful rock formations and a little off shoot down to a small cave where you can cool off with some water from the mountain stream. When you get almost to the top of the mountain there is a trail that forks to the right that will take you through some very large rock formations and arches. Highly recommend taking this route. It is not as well marked but had no trouble following it. It will take you back up to the main trail where you can take the loop around the top of the mountain for some majestic views! By taking the trail through the rock formations and the full loop at the top of the mountains it ended up being a little over 9 miles. It is a little strenuous on the way up but well worth the effort.

44 degrees...awesome day for a long hike. The out part of the trail is a gradually climb until you get to the base of Black Mountain. From the base the trail switches back and forth to the top. This is a moderate hike so expect to get your blood pressure up in certain segments. Beautiful rock formations with stairs that are made between the rocks to get you to the top.

hiking
3 months ago

Today was the day we actually hiked and explored more than just to the overlook and back, which we have done probably 5 or 6 times. And WOW at what we have been missing! Below the overlook, you are introduced to HUGE boulders and interesting rock formations. I'm not really sure what sections of trails we followed, as we cut back on and off the trail so many times. We came across the remains of a pretty big house foundation and tall chimney attached to it on the way back off the old jeep trail. We explored it and took pics that I will add. I researched the history of this and also the spring house & chimney you pass at the very beginning, and these date back to the 1800s! So very cool to enter the doorway of the remnants of this home and walk around where the family lived so long ago. We had no idea this was even here just going to the overlook and back! Next time when we have more daylight we will go explore the Windless Cave and finish the entire trail to Brady Mtn.

Quiet. Well marked. Although would probably rate it more of a moderate than easy hike. Not because of elevation or difficulty, but there are extremely slick, large and loose rock throughout mixed in with the roots and stumps. The trail is very narrow too. Not much room when passing others with pets or trail runners. But still, very pretty and peaceful. Would recommend it and would do it again.

hiking
4 months ago