hiking
muddy
over grown
6 days ago

Beautiful trail that takes you from muddy flood plains to a more densely wooded mountainside. The trail is well marked and maintained fairly well (though I would recommend pants). We encountered three types of nonvenomous snake, a porcupine, and only two other groups on the trail! You do have to walk along a couple of roads, but it was worth it!

hiking
11 days ago

Don’t either bother with this trail. Trail just dies after a .25 mile or so. And doesn’t even connect to bear pond trail like it shows on the state forest map.

hiking
muddy
rocky
scramble
19 days ago

It’s a good trail but there is a lot of mud and it is marked very well. The creeks are beautiful and the scenery was amazing if your looking for a little challenge this is the trail for you.

Started Appalachian to get to darlington/Tuscarora then on to Waggoners Gap. All in all 15.3 miles. Everything was great except the last 4 miles is nothing but shifty rocks. Hard to tell where to step when everything shifts and parts where you think are just ground are actually holes so you can easily roll your ankles and lose your footing. Slowed us down tremendously and got to be a little nerve wrecking as the sun was going down. Thought I was toast for a while as I sprained my ankle and then burst a blister on the other foot the last 1.5 miles but I powered through. Probably won’t do this one again for a while. Maybe start at Waggoners gap and head the other way so we aren’t fatigued by the time we get to the hardest part!!!

hiking
muddy
over grown
rocky
1 month ago

VERY VERY WRONG!!!! It seems as though the reviews and rating of this trail are not completely accurate. There is two different starting points for the trail. The one starts in the Tuscarora forest where it’s broken off of the Barnhart trail. The other is a parking area at the top of the mountain, tucked into the sharp curve off of Route 274. If you start at the top and only hike back to the McCaskey graves, then it is quite simple and good for all skill sets. That part out and back to the same parking area is about 1.5 miles with 0.75 miles one way. The other part of the trail however starts at the bottom off of hemlock rd and splits off of the barnhardt trail where it very quickly begins a sharp incline. It take you about .7 miles straight up the side of the mountain to meet up with the other side of the trail at the graves. However, this part is NOT AT ALL easy or appropriate for all skip sets. It’s definitely classified as hard and very difficult. Bring plenty of water and good, sturdy hiking shoes because there’s plenty of spaces for your feet to slide with how steep it is. The beginning of the trail is very muddy and wet, that only lasts about 20 ft, then you meet a tiny spring, then the road continues straight but there is a red flame on the right to tell you to cut off and go onto the trail there. Soon after you will come to a sign where you can either continue on barnhardt or go up Big Mountain. That’s the start of the trail from the bottom which entails well over 1000 ft elevation gain and if quite thick in many spots with some thorn covered vines scattered about. If you take the treck the whole way up, past the graves, out to the road, and all the way back down, then you will total about 3.2 miles all together. So this whole listing is wrong. If you were to start at route 274 and make it to the graves, there are no clear markings to continue on the trail but if you come the graves on your right, the trail cuts to the left and soon you will see a red marker. This would probably be difficult though. I would definitely suggest starting at the bottom and getting the climb over with and then you’ll also know which direction to head back down. Anyways... the trail is tough but really neat and tucked away. We happened upon a porcupine which was neat. He scurried quickly away into some rocks. Climbing up was very difficult but feels awesome when you make it to the top!

We only did the tunnel trail ! It was a nice short hike to end the day.

hiking
2 months ago

This trail is very terribly marked. You don’t get very far before you can’t even find the trail anymore. It’s also very overgrown with spikes weeds the whole way.

This was a very easy trail. It only had a few moderate up hills. It was pretty boring. no views, nothing really interesting to see, very marshy, and pretty close to the road a bit of the time. It would be okay for trail running.

hiking
muddy
over grown
3 months ago

Had a great early spring hike on this trail with friends and dogs. Overall the trail was clear and easy to follow with most of it blazed. The muddy areas were pretty easy to navigate around but I am sure that it would be almost impossible to get through some of the thickets in the summer. It could also use a few more signs at the intersections with roads and other trails. Fortunately we also had a State Forest map with us so we didn't have any trouble staying on the right trail.

hiking
private property
rocky
3 months ago

good for winter. probably won't do it in summer. I expect it would be quite over grown. wear pants if you do.

Enjoyable and relaxing trail. Recommend going counter clockwise. Blazed in red for the most part. Trail would be difficult to follow in warmer months when plants have grown back in.

hiking
blowdown
muddy
5 months ago

hiking
rocky
5 months ago

I would like to recommend this trail for dog lovers and hikers that like uphill trails. Front half wore me out. Back half was a mix of up and down. more downhill than anything. Lots of wildlife tracks. Overall a good trail. Did go off trail a few times.

hiking
over grown
rocky
6 months ago

This trail is good trail for an experienced hiker. Unfortunately it is not well marked even in November. We found red, yellow and blue markers but no idea which trail we ended up following. At one point we finally found a sign for Iron Horse Trail, followed the arrows and ended up walking on the road for 3 miles and never found any marking leading back to the trail.

Had done as out-and-back from Colonel Denning State Park to Waggoners Gap. Would say this was probably the most difficult trail I've done so far. This has nothing to do with the ascents or rocks in particular, but two specific areas of the trail which slowed my pace quite a bit: 1. When approaching the first/sharp bend in the ridge, this is where the rocks begin. What made this segment troublesome is most of the rocks are covered by a sea of overgrown grass/weeds which made it very difficult to get footing. A lot of nice foot-size gaps between the rocks to easily step into by accident. Oh yeah, and almost every rock you step on wobbles. Most of the rocks on this trail were pointy/flat unstable ones which added to the difficulty. 2. Sometime after this sharp bend and before the final bend to Waggoner's gap, there is an area where the rocks are so numerous and the trail so thin/unrecognizable that it is really hard to find your way. This also just happens to be where the least amount of blazes are. Not sure if some had just faded or were scratched off but got into a loop a couple times around here. The trail in general has plenty of obvious blazing...was really just this part that could use the most. Though I will say it does give a bit of a remote bushwack experience. The Flat Rock view is awesome. The rock is a decent size to fit a small group, but not so big as to allow that many people at once if really crowded. The stretch between Flat Rock view and around where it intersects Warner trail was probably the simplest part. Once you pass Flat Rock, there aren't really any views the whole way until you get to the Charlie Irvin shelter. You can peek a little through the trees of the mountains throughout, but that's about it. Same as another reviewer said...glad I did it and is a great challenge, but most likely would not do again. UPDATE 11/23/19: Finished the remaining segment between Waggoners Gap and northern terminus. The first couple miles east of the Waggoners Gap are pretty much the same troublesome rocky terrain as the other side of the trail mentioned above (large, flat, pointy, wobbly, etc). Luckily there is good blazing to find the way, because there isn't much to distinguish the trail from the rocky terrain around that stretch. Though may have been easier without the leaves to see the blazes way ahead...could be more difficult in summer. After that region, the rocks occur in isolated areas and eventually becomes way less rocky in general. Did this segment going from Darlington Trail to Waggoners Gap. Was surprised how many little gaps/dips there were in the ridge. Looking at the mountain from the south I never noticed there was so many. Lots of up and down though most aren't very steep. The most intense was probably where the trail goes straight up a power line clearing, but there is a nice view at the top before the trail continues back into the woods. Of course, doing the trail in late fall you can pretty much see out over Cumberland Valley through the trees most of the way. There is another spot with a "View" sign to a short side trail that leads to another decent view which was unexpected surprise. That is pretty much the point where the rockiness increases (if going west). https://www.hikethetuscarora.org/section-1-3

hiking
8 months ago

no look out, but beautiful hike

It’s a god trail just overgrown in the summer when I did it

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