hiking

dogs on leash

trail running

walking

forest

birding

kid friendly

river

wild flowers

views

wildlife

mountain biking

nature trips

camping

waterfall

Located at the southern reaches of the Laurel Ridge, Ohiopyle State Park encompasses approximately 20,500 acres of rugged natural beauty and serves as the gateway to the Laurel Highlands. Close to major metropolitan areas and offering vast choices of activities, Ohiopyle State Park attracts millions of visitors annually. Passing through the heart of the park, the rushing waters of the Youghiogheny [yaw-ki-gay-nee] River Gorge are the centerpiece for Ohiopyle. The Yough [yawk] provides some of the best whitewater boating in the eastern United States, as well as spectacular scenery. Ohiopyle is the southern gateway into the Laurel Highlands and it represents the beautiful natural resources and unique sense of community that visitors can find throughout the region. Ohiopyle State Park is part of the protection and advocacy for this region by participating in the Laurel Highlands Conservation Landscape Initiative (CLI). This group is a partnership with landowners, community members, non-profit organizations and other stakeholders to protect the natural resources and bring community revitalization.

My brother and I did the 11.9 mile loop today in 5 hours. If you want the 8.5 mile loop, you’d probably need to hop from loop to loop; there is no dedicated 8.5 mile loop. Contrary to the review below me, we felt the trail was fairly well marked, and quite easy, even with some snow. Just grab a paper map at the trailhead and it’s very easy to figure out. Yes, the portion of the trail that goes along the river could use a little work, but it still wasn’t bad at all. Overall, nice trail, decent views, pretty easy. Great day hike! I love the Ohiopyle area.

Rain was light and steady but the trail was great. 50 degrees on the 1st week in dec 17.

1 month ago

The TL;DR...IMHO, a brutal trail system. Treacherous footing due to miles of baseball sized granite chunks hidden beneath leaves. Signage can be very confusing. Numerous picturesque footbridges over Bear Run (and their on/off ramps) are extremely slick (rain and snow).

Although I just hiked part of the Black as well as the Yellow, white and Orange (which is marked in yellow on Park’s handout!) in Dec., lm assuming the trails are covered in fallen leaves regardless of the season... unless the beleaguered trails crews rake the trails. My point is...although the trail surface looks uniform and “smooth” (as trails go), it ain’t. For about 4 miles I was walking on baseball sized granite chunks which were hidden by the fallen leaves most of the time. IMHO this is a brutal trail system. If you don’t mind a piece of advice...DONT FOCUS YOUR EYES MORE THSN 2 FEET AHEAD of your current footfall. OR... you may sprain an ankle and/or end up in a greenbrier clump after you trip and fall (which I did once). For those who may be unaware...greenbrier is like organic barbed wire.

Also, take the paper map (avail at trailhead) with you BUT don’t rely on the color-coded circular trail medallions. They are inexpertly attached to the “milestone’” posts (which are from .25 to 1.0 miles apart). I.e., sometimes the trail markers arent visible, and therefore not useable, as a guide from the direction of approach. To be CERTAIN you must check each side of the post or you may end up in Scranton. As a result, it very easy to take a wrong turn OR just stand there and fume about the confusing signage. I found the most reliable orienteering was to gauge progress by referring to the NUMBERS on each periodic Oak 8x8 “milestone” posts. Check the top of each post for a metal emblem. Using them in sequence (and this app for contour lines) I was able to decipher the trail labyrinth.

I was hiking for about 4hours, but TBH, it stopped being fun after 2 hours mainly due to the extremely treacherous footing...no matter how wide the trail was at some points. It goes without saying, these trails should not EVEN be attempted once snow covered in deep winter. Imagine walking on a pool table, after the break, blindfolded.
PS, there are several picturesque trail bridges over Bear Run and tributaries...most snow covered and slicker’n owl shit. Especially the ramps at either end. Should have used stairs IMHO. Even in summer, the combination of moss on those wooden bridge decks and on/off ramps, drenched after a rain, could be daunting.

No wonder Kaufman built a house in order to enjoy the views of Bear Run. JK...kinda.

Trail would be great, but the bridges are out. Until they’re repaired, don’t waste your time.

Amazing trail, amazing views. Definitely challenging on the hills and not too much flat hiking except up in the ridge. Hiked in to the shelter area for an overnight and back the following morning. I think the first big climb on the return hike is the worst..."switchback mountain".

hiking
2 months ago

The trail is well maintained and the flashes are well placed. This trail is a pretty steady incline through the woods. Not really any views until the very top where there is also a parking lot and lots of photographers/tourists.

Nice view! Super easy to get to.

hiking
2 months ago

loved this trail nice distance and well marked

hiking
2 months ago

This was a very pretty out and back hike. Be sure to stop at the Cucumber Falls in the beginning of the hike or you'll miss a hidden gem!

I'm not sure why they're calling this the Sugar Run Sneak Trail. It's actually a section of the Kentuck Trail which intersects the Jonathan Run Trail across from the upper falls area of Jonathan Run, and then follows the Jonathan Run Trail downstream to the GAP. If you then walk a short distance (probably no more than a quarter mile) along the GAP toward Connellsville you can easily get to Sugar Run Falls just off the GAP.

Too crowded and confusing.

walking
3 months ago

This is a dumb trail. I would not recommend this trail to anyone. I could have done something similar to this in my local Park in Maryland. It's not challenging and there is no view along the trail. It leads to a viewing area that was crowded with old men trying to capture photos. So all of their tripods were set up and in the way. Then when you try to loop around across the road, it isn't marked at all. We meandered up and down the road looking for the trail crossover and luckily we found it. At no point are the trails marked with a color, so you know the trail markings. The Baughman trail was red going out and then Blue black when we crossed the road and then leaven to loop around Makes no sense to me. Dumb. I do not recommend this trail.

walking
3 months ago

This is a dumb trail. I would not recommend this trail to anyone. I could have done something similar to this in my local Park in Maryland. It's not challenging and there is no view along the trail. It leads to a viewing area that was crowded with old men trying to capture photos. So all of their tripods were set up and in the way. Then when you try to loop around across the road, it isn't marked at all. We meandered up and down the road looking for the trail crossover and luckily we found it. At no point are the trails marked with a color, so you know the trail markings. The Baughman trail was red going out and then Blue black when we crossed the road and then leaven to loop around Makes no sense to me. Dumb. I do not recommend this trail.

walking
3 months ago

This is a dumb trail. I would not recommend this trail to anyone. I could have done something similar to this in my local Park in Maryland. It's not challenging and there is no view along the trail. It leads to a viewing area that was crowded with old men trying to capture photos. So all of their tripods were set up and in the way. Then when you try to loop around across the road, it isn't marked at all. We meandered up and down the road looking for the trail crossover and luckily we found it. At no point are the trails marked with a color, so you know the trail markings. The Baughman trail was red going out and then Blue black when we crossed the road and then leaven to loop around Makes no sense to me. Dumb. I do not recommend this trail.

walking
3 months ago

This is a dumb trail. I would not recommend this trail to anyone. I could have done something similar to this in my local Park in Maryland. It's not challenging and there is no view along the trail. It leads to a viewing area that was crowded with old men trying to capture photos. So all of their tripods were set up and in the way. Then when you try to loop around across the road, it isn't marked at all. We meandered up and down the road looking for the trail crossover and luckily we found it. At no point are the trails marked with a color, so you know the trail markings. The Baughman trail was red going out and then Blue black when we crossed the road and then leaven to loop around Makes no sense to me. Dumb. I do not recommend this trail.

hiking
3 months ago

Easy, fun hike. The sites are beautiful and you can hear the river even if you can't see it. It gives a great view of the river when you can see it.

Moderate. Beautiful lookouts at the end. 13 miles black loop.

this rails-to-trails it's just a beautiful area of our country here

hiking
4 months ago

Great views!!!easy walk for the most part!!!

We were immediately greeted with wildflowers pulling into the trailhead parking lot. The trail is rated moderate and is a 2.9 mile loop. My main interest in choosing this trail was seeing the natural slides. We must have taken a wrong turn because we ended at what I thought was a dead end. After looking at a map when we were back in the car, we were actually only 200 meters upstream from the slide… so close! Regardless this was a beautiful secluded walk that ran along a babbling stream. For more visuals of ohiopyle go to sleepydog.dog

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