Grafton Lakes State Park, on the forested mountain ridge between the Taconic and Hudson Valleys, includes five ponds and 2,357 acres. Long Pond has a large, sandy beach, which is a popular summer attraction. Anglers can go after rainbow and brown trout in Long, Second and Shaver Pond. Pickerel, perch, and bass are abundant in all ponds including Mill Pond and walleye are found at the Martin-Durham Reservoir. All ponds have launch facilities for canoes, sailboats and rowboats, electric boat are allowed. Visitors also picnic, walk the nature trails, and hike, bike or ride horses along the 25 miles of park trails. In winter, the trails are groomed for cross-country skiers and snowmobilers, and visitors may also snowshoe or ice skate.

backpacking
10 days ago

on Long Pond Trail

hiking
26 days ago

Good hike for kids!

go into the grafton lakes state park winter entrance road go about 1 mile down look for the fire tower trail on your right for a longer more scenic hike to the tower.

okay....dont listen to google for directions. If you are looking for the fire tower, take rt 2 to babcock rd and turn on fire tower rd. google was all over the place...including a quad trail. views from the tower are amazing. you can see vermont, mass and ny.

Great easy trail and beautiful views from the tower! Have to go around a gate to get up to the tower but pretty clear other than that!

Easy hike to do with kids. More of a walk along a gravel road. The directions take you to a gate which is about a tenth of a mile from the fire tower. The trailhead and parking are along north long pond road not where the apps. Directions bring you

This really isn't too much of a trail per se; it's more a nice walk in the woods up a wide woods road ... easily wide enough for an vehicle. I brought 6 of my kids with me aged 4 to 12; they had no problems other than a grassy area at about the 1 mile mark that was very wet and quite muddy. When thru us off was that there wasn't a clear marking to turn off to get to the fire town ... just a gated road saying don't not block, emergency vehicles only ... we assumed this was something that was a "no go" area and kept walking until a half mile later I thought it felt like we went too far. We turned around an went up the access road, and sure enough there was the tower. It was very buggy at that time in the grass at the top and the grassy area around one mile. But lots of newts on the way down, and good time was had by all.

This is a great trail if you are looking for a short hike. The fire tower up top offers amazing views of the surrounding area, and you can see a lot of wildlife from up there. Trail is great for all fitness levels.

Our group of three set off from the parking area on Dunham Reservoir Rd to do the loop around the D. Reservoir: Double Bit to Johnson Rd to S. Dunham Trail. The Double Bit did not seem to be marked along the gravel road in any way, and we were a little confused and surprised to learn that we had to cross the Quacken Kill on marginally helpful rocks. 2/3 of us got at least one foot wet, so maybe should have gone with boots over toe shoes and hiking sandals (it was a cold, windy day in June). Once in the woods on the other side, we began seeing red trail markers on trees, so off we went with more confidence. We began seeing orange flagging hanging from trees, which in hindsight, may have been the way to go since it seemed to bypass the somewhat overgrown and unmarked trail that went around the perimeter of the peninsula in the middle of the reservoir. You could easily skip this if you don't want to bushwhack at all, but it was okay, and you certainly can't get lost since you're by the shore of the reservoir the whole time. Amazingly, we didn't pick up any ticks doing this. Once we got back to the more beaten path, the going was easy and the trail fairly well marked. We ate lunch at a fire ring on the shore not far off the trail, which was nice. We popped out onto Johnson Rd and found the entrance to S. Dunham easily enough. It was nice, but away from the lake, so less scenic -- maybe an argument for doing the loop in reverse if you want to end with the most scenic part and a stream crossing. The only unpleasant thing about this trail was that there were big patches where the trail was in a muddy ditch that the thick woods made it hard to get around easily -- another argument for sticking with Gortex boots. All in all, a nice loop that took us 3 hours with a leisurely lunch break and stops to double check GPS. Could be done in 2 +/-. The kayaking looks very nice, and we saw a solitary loon on the upper section. Nice!

I agree with Chard. should be listed as easy. you can move through here very quickly.
It is though, a very beautiful area and I will definitely return. It's nice to hike a trail for a change and not see a single piece of trash.