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White Mountain National Forest lies within the White Mountains in the U.S. states of New Hampshire and Maine. It's crossed by the White Mountain Trail and Kancamagus scenic drives, plus part of the Appalachian Trail. The New England gem dates back to the 1860's. Here, the Mt. Washington Cog Railway climbs to the summit of Mt. Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern U.S. The Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now the most popular route to the summit and boasts some of the best views. This New England forest is also known for great hiking trails, beautiful views including spectacular views of fall foliage, winter skiing, and ample outdoor recreation opportunities. The forest provides wildlife habitat to black bears and peregrine falcons amongst other animals.

Pretty hike. It was certainly microspike worthy-especially next to the cascades. The yellow blazes could use some touching up and the trail could use some maintenance - lots of down large trees on the 1st 1/2 of the trail. Would like to come back during the summer to really take advantage of the gorgeous cascades.

hiking
1 day ago

hiking
1 day ago

hiking
4 days ago

hiking
7 days ago

The parking lot on rt 16 is easy to find, immediately cross a bridge and you're in the Woods. The first two miles follow Stony Brook, then the mile and a half before reaching the A.T. Is where the work is.. a right on the A.T. Leads to the Imp shelter .5 m away.. A left on the A.T. Leads to Moriah Summit, the 1.5m is a scramble from vista to vista over slab and through scrub. The summit itself is a flat top boulder no more than twelve feet across. The false summit just below has an acre of slab with the kids view rich people pay a lot of money for, good spot for lunch!! I was surprised at how similar this hike is as to Shelburne Moriah, its neighbor, both hikes were ten to eleven miles, both had 3000 ft gain from the lot, and both took about seven hours...

Out of towners, beware, this is a hard climb!!!!

No one here has actually provided any real tangible data, that would benefit, so I have decided to offer up some sage advice.

To start:
- It is December
- It is New Hampshire
- It is rated hard

The first and most important item is the direction you choose to do this hike. We chose the direction starting with the Blueberry Ledge Trail, to the Rollins trail, finishing with the Dicey Mill's Trail (clockwise). If you decide to do the hike, be prepared to use spikes or microspikes. There are sections you will be descending off of rock ledges that cannot be done otherwise, after you ascend the summit. The Blueberry ledge trail is a constant vertical ascent from the start around 1300ft, to the summit around 4000ft.

Second, the direction we went was a two-man operation. I had to push my friend up, so that he could lower a branch as a hand-hold. Unless you are an experienced climber, there is one large section you cannot do yourself.

Third, is hike length. It took us just under 8.5 hours. The ascent section was non-stop, but the backside on Rollins and Dicey are just more time-consuming. Allot the proper amount of time. We made it out of the woods by the time it was dark.

Lastly, is the recommendation on equipment.

- Plenty of water
- Spikes or microspikes (Winter)
- Headlamps
- Walking sticks with picks (Winter)

Overall, a great challenge, but be prepared.

hiking
7 days ago

At this time of the year (late Nov/early Dec) the top 1/3 of the trail is snow and ice covered. The middle 1/3 was frozen ground and ice patches and the first 1/3 frozen ground. Foot traction was a definite benefit on the middle and top of the trail. There were some tall steps and small scrambles involved. The ridge line was fantastic with glimpses of view between the leafless trees. Clouds were rolling in and we could see Mt Washington above the cloud layer, then the higher clouds rolled in but Mt W. continued to shine through them and slowly got covered by them. It was incredible to see that mountain shining through all those clouds. The blazes are old an could be easy to lose the trail. In the snowy sections it had already been broken. But isn't that part of the fun of hiking, needing to figure out the way sometimes? Hiking is not just another walk in the woods. Paying attention and continuing to look should keep you on the trail. Tricky part is when the trail turns left at the top of the stream. Great hike and would do it again.