Best wild flowers trails in Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada

7,394 Reviews
Explore the most popular wild flowers trails in Toiyabe National Forest with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of wild flowers trails in Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada
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Top trails (55)
#1 - Hunter Creek Trail
Toiyabe National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2127)
Length: 6.4 mi • Est. 2 h 35 m
Situated just outside Reno, this is a popular destination for hiking and trail running. At the end of this beautiful route is a 30-foot waterfall. The trail is well-marked and good for the whole family. At the trailhead visitors will find a parking area and restrooms. Make sure to bring sunscreen and enough water on a hot day.Show more
#2 - Raintree Trail
Toiyabe National Forest
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(648)
Length: 5.3 mi • Est. 3 h 22 m
Steep switchbacks and the altitude will test your endurance on this hike. Views of surrounding peaks and valleys should make it worth while. If the views don't impress you, perhaps the magical feeling of walking underneath the Bristlecone Pines will. If you travel quietly (sunrise or sunset), you could see deer, and perhaps mountain lion tracks. If there has been snow, the trail may be impassable, even through May. The trail is extremely well marked and easy to follow -- just keep climbing. Downhill is a breeze. Once you're at Raintree, it's only 1/3 mile to Mummy Springs (trailhead/sign at Raintree). Show more
#3 - Castle Rock Loop Trail
Toiyabe National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(636)
Length: 2.7 mi • Est. 1 h 30 m
Nice hike through Tahoe forest to Castle Rock. Beautiful views. Good rock climbing if you want to go to the top. Trail markings are somewhat confusing, as the hike joins and then leaves a portion of the Tahoe Rim Trail.Show more
#4 - Cave Rock Trail
Toiyabe National Forest
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(393)
Length: 0.8 mi • Est. 25 m
Easy trail that goes to the top of the tunnel over hwy 50. Well maintained, all ages to the base of the rocks that form the tunnel. Little more climbing there but still easy to get to top of rocks. WONDERFUL picture spot. Kid friendly for non-squeamish parents. This is a walking trail for sure. Show more
#5 - Tom Cooke Trail
Toiyabe National Forest
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(503)
Length: 3.7 mi • Est. 1 h 45 m
#6 - Showers Lake via the PCT
Toiyabe National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(238)
Length: 9.8 mi • Est. 4 h 52 m
This is a relatively easy trail from just below Carson Pass on Highway 88 to Meiss Lake. It includes fantastic views of the surrounding peaks, Caples Lake, and Lake Tahoe, and is an excellent swimming destination in the summer, plus a great snow camping destination in the winter. The trail is the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). It is 4 miles from the parking lot to Meiss lake, with an elevation gain of about 300 feet as you climb over the saddle before dropping down to Meiss valley. The trail is well sign-posted and marked. It follows the highway for a little over 1/4 a mile before turning right into a wooded valley. After another 1/4 mile, there is a moderate climb up to the pass, before a gentle slope down to Meiss valley. The remaining 2.5 miles is flat and easy. Shortly after the trail drops into the valley, there is a fork. You will leave the PCT and take the left (eastern) fork, which is an old jeep route. After a short distance you will see Meiss lake to your left (west). It is the warmest lake in the Lake Tahoe region and great for swimming, although it is quite shallow. Return the way you came. In the winter, most people ignore the PCT and simply navigate directly to the saddle. Navigation here is very easy on a clear day as there are few trees 100 feet above the parking lot, and so the visibility is excellent. If you ignore the PCT and take a more direct route, there will be more climbing. Beware the avalanche point on the north of the saddle, on the western side. It creates a terrain trap out of the trail and can be dangerous. As always in the winter, be very careful with navigation, the weather can change fast here.Show more
#7 - Chimney Beach Trail
Toiyabe National Forest
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(225)
Length: 2.4 mi • Est. 1 h 8 m
#8 - Hole in the Wall Trail
Toiyabe National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(268)
Length: 5.0 mi • Est. 2 h 17 m
#9 - Barney Lake
Toiyabe National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(159)
Length: 8.3 mi • Est. 3 h 20 m
There is a $15 parking fee at Mono Village. Aspen groves and distant snow-capped peaks. This is a nice hike that takes you from the bustling "city" of the Mono Village Resort to semi-solitude in roughly four easy miles. There is a small stream to cross early in the hike, but nothing that can't usually be jumped across. Half way to the lake you will pass through some Aspen groves just outside the Hoover Wilderness. The final climb to the lake can seem tedious, but the rewards are well worth effort.Show more
#10 - Tahoe Rim Trail (TRT)
Toiyabe National Forest
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(61)
Length: 169.3 mi • Est. Multi-day
A 13 day through hike around the TRT starting at Tahoe Meadows. You can not bike the entire trail because some of the path goes through designated wilderness and certain areas where biking is prohibited. There are guided hikes available through The Tahoe Rim Trail Association. Show more
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