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Best trails in Spring Mountains National Recreation Area

4,749 Reviews
Looking for a great trail in Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Nevada? AllTrails has 22 great hiking trails, trail running trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 11 moderate trails in Spring Mountains National Recreation Area ranging from 1.9 to 6.8 miles and from 5,462 to 9,767 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
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Top trails (22)
#1 - Cathedral Rock Trail
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1304)
Length: 2.7 mi • Est. 1 h 44 m
NOTE: This trail is closed during winter. Check with the park before visiting. From the signed trailhead the trail starts in a westward direction at a slight grade. It winds through thick patches of aspens and evergreens before passing by the alternative trail. The trail turns south and heads toward the magnificent Echo Cliffs. The Cliffs have a sheer drop of almost 1,000 feet. As the trail snakes to the west of Echo Cliffs, a side trail leads to a small seep. Water flows from the seep in the spring. Once past Echo Cliffs, the trail heads west and the grade becomes steeper as it makes its way across a slope. As you traverse the slope, you can see the destruction an avalanche can wreak on a mountain. Many trees and boulders are still misplaced by an avalanche that happened years ago. The trail flattens out as it heads toward the backside of Cathedral Rock. This is the easiest and most enjoyable part of the trail, a cakewalk through a forest, and you forget that you're 8,000 feet above sea level. Save your energy for the last quarter mile of the trail-it's steep. When the trail divides, go right on the unmarked footpath. About a half-dozen switchbacks leads to the top of Cathedral Rock. The view becomes more spectacular with every step. On the far NE side there's a place to sit and admire the view. Mt. Charleston Lodge lies 1,000 feet below and farther to the east you can see the desert floor. To the north is Mummy Mountain; to the NW is Mary Jane Falls, and to the west is Charleston Peak. If you eat lunch, you may have a visitor or two. This is the only place in the world you'll have the opportunity to see the Palmer Chipmunk. As hard as it is, resist feeding them. By feeding them they become dependent on humans for their food. In the winter the chipmunks must rely on their food-gathering skills or perish. Watch children closely at the top; the drop-offs are more than 500 feet at the edges. Railings have been erected, but they seem to entice people to climb down to them. Show more
#2 - Griffith Peak via South Loop Trail
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(637)
Length: 10.1 mi • Est. 6 h 5 m
Strenuous 3,100' climb with spectacular 360 deg. view at peak (Calif to Ariz) You begin to climb from your first step onto this trail, but you hike through some of the most lush, forested areas in these mountains. Whether you marvel at the rugged cliffs, wonder at the caves and it's possible users, listen to the water rushing over the rocky ledges back in the canyons; or just revel in the colors of wildflowers & grasses at your feet, the smell of pines, or the sounds of birds, butterflies, and the wind rustling through the aspens; every aching muscle will be worth it on the South Loop Trail. This is the easiest route to Mt. Charleston Peak (8 1/2 miles), and "just" reaching the crest of the ridge (4 miles up) and the lush meadows area (1/2 mile further) is a great sense of accomplishment and joy. This is a perfectly acceptable trail for seasoned and conditioned horses (only a few rocky, narrow spots), but there is no water along this route so you'll have to pack plenty. Harris Springs route is easier but not prettier. Sign in book at the peakShow more
#3 - Upper and Lower Bristlecone Loop
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(527)
Length: 5.7 mi • Est. 2 h 55 m
#4 - Upper Bristlecone Trail
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(390)
Length: 4.6 mi • Est. 2 h 26 m
This trail begins in a nicely forested area with white fir and large aspen, and climbs until you reach the rugged, exposed upper slopes with bristlecone pines. The trail is easy to follow for both hikers and bikes, with many spots along the trail to stop and admire the view. Be sure and look up at the ski slopes in Lee Canyon, you will often see wild horses grazing on the grass in late spring, summer, and fall. The flexibility of this trail can be appreciated by all levels of hikers; tailor the hike to the type of terrain you enjoy. Plenty of lunch spots along the trail, but no water to hike to.Show more
#5 - Echo Overlook Trail
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(369)
Length: 4.6 mi • Est. 2 h 27 m
Even though this is a strenuous hike due to the steep switchbacks and elevation gain, it is a beautiful trail from the very beginning. The fall colors are magnificent, but this is a great way to escape the summer heat because you are under trees the entire time. Aspens, cottonwoods and pines fill the avalanche chute at eye level, while brilliantly colored wildflowers and lush green grasses cover the soil. Look for the large cave in the cliffs on your L as you cross back and forth across the side canyon, up the steep stone steps (do NOT take the gravel road to the L), and up the E side of the avalanche chute, climbing rapidly towards Echo Cliffs. The slopes are generously covered with more flowers (lots of dark purples & brilliant red paintbrush), and you'll soon hear/see the water flowing down the falls/ledges back in the canyon toward the knob below Griffith Peak. The overlook is a great place to stop, relax, lunch, etc. but be very careful near the edge.Show more
#6 - Little Falls Trail
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(317)
Length: 0.8 mi • Est. 18 m
This hike to a hidden waterfall starts at the stairs. Climb the stairs and head right on the unmarked trail. The slight grade makes for easy walking. After a few hundred yards, the trail forks to the left. If you continue straight, the trail dead-ends in a few yards. This section of the trail is steeper. Continue about 300 yards where the trail forks. Follow the right fork less than 100 yards into the narrow canyon to Little Falls.Show more
#7 - Stanley B Springs Trail
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(304)
Length: 3 mi • Est. 1 h 12 m
#8 - Trail Canyon Overlook
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(147)
Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 2 h 2 m
Seldom used deer path leads beyond Cathedral Rock for nice view of Trail Canyon This is a nice workout with a steady climb and mostly tree lined the entire way. You'll follow the same trail as for Cathedral Rock, but will continue on the main trail straight instead of turning R for the path to the top of Cathedral Rock. When you reach the end of the main trail (past Cathedral Rock turnoff), look for the culvert with a cast iron lid (36.25422, 115.65699 elev. 8510) -- be sure and stay to the R as you cross the first gravel drainage (you're now just above Little Falls). Overlook is at 36.26024, 115.66049, elev. 8790. Try to stay on the deer path even though it is steep and slippery (pine needles).Show more
#9 - Mummy Mountain
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(76)
Length: 8.8 mi • Est. 5 h 26 m
This is the route to the summit of the highest peak of Mummy Mountain, called Mummy's Tummy. It starts from the Trail Canyon Trailhead and can be broken into 4 sections: Trail Canyon- a steady climb of about 1500 feet over 2 miles to the intersection with the North Loop. North Loop - a slightly more gradual climb across the length of the mountain. The Scree Slope - a very steep hill of loose gravel with no clear path. This is the hardest part of the hike with an elevation gain of approximately 700 feet with inclines around 50% and very poor footing. Class 3 scrambling the entire time. Final ascent, hiking across the base of the upper cliffs to a short but steep and technical class 3/4 rock chute that arrives at the summit. From the summit there are views of the Las Vegas valley, Mt. Charleston, Griffith Peak, Angel Peak and hundreds of miles in all directions. This trail is for experienced hikers. It is physically and technically challenging. Be sure to bring food and hydration. At a quick pace it can take around 4.5 hours but the average hiker should plan on 6-8 hours round trip.Show more
#10 - Bristlecone, Bonanza, No Name Loop
Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(134)
Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 3 h 10 m
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