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An early addition to the National Park Service (park #10), Glacier National Park in Montana turned 100 on May 11, 2010. The park is immense, with 1 million acres (4,047 km2), 300 lakes and a reach of 1,584 square miles (4,103 km2). The park is considered the centerpiece of a vast region of protected land that includes some 16,000 square miles (41,440 km2). The park features some 700 miles of hiking trails and supports all manner of outdoor activities, such as biking, boating, fishing, and horseback riding. There are 13 campgrounds that allow for roughly 1000 campsites. Other accommodation options include hotels, inns, lodges and motels. Part of Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, this park has over 50 remaining glaciers and 130 named lakes under the tall Rocky Mountain peaks. There are historic hotels and a landmark road in this region of rapidly receding glaciers. These mountains, formed by an overthrust, have the world's best sedimentary fossils from the Proterozoic era.

Stunning. Feels like five hikes in one. Scenery changes and each scene is as magnificent as the last.

Beautiful. Lots of traffic. For a short hike this has exceptional views. I love the entire journey through the forest not just the view at the end :).

hiking
9 hours ago

My group thought this hike was great. On the drive to trailhead, we saw a momma black bear and two young cubs foraging in a field along the way. Perfect way to start the day!

Gang of Coloradans here, so elevation didn’t impact us. Started at 10am thinking we would run into hoards of people, but saw probably 8 groups total, maybe 20 people throughout the entire hike (not including 2 horse trail groups). First bit is wooded and covered, people are right about the horse waste; not the best but also not the worst (like, get over it, share the trail). We were excited to see some different scat at about mile 2, looked like black bear had a great lunch. Steady incline, but manageable. Some steep areas, we brought hiking poles for the day hike but found they weren’t necessary. Saw a snake along the switchbacks, small and harmless. Pretty stream in the middle of the hike, another group mentioned seeing a moose in that area. Up and up included some open areas where coverage was sparse. When you’re about a mile from lake, coverage is gone — bring a hat! Sun was brutal. As it opened up, it was really beautiful and still ascending gradually. Lake itself is surreal, so turquoise and opaque. There’s a healthy shoreline along lake, for many groups to chill and enjoy.

We’ve been a lot of places and done many hikes, and this was one of our top purely for the lake experience. Don’t listen to the party poopers saying majority of it’s boring #takeahike — Bring bear spray and enjoy! Happy trails!

it's a beautiful hike! it's pretty much a long gradual climb all the way there. there are lots of huckleberries and wild raspberries to snack on, but the bears like them too! we walked up on a huge grizzly snacking on them in one of the bigger berry patches 8/13/18

My husband and I did this as part of a 3 day 2 night backpacking trip. We started the trail from two medicine and hiked counterclockwise (100% recommend starting this way). Starts out with a gradual incline and is very dense forest. Be aware of bears & make a lot of noise. About 3 miles In we turned a counter and saw a grizzly with 2 cubs. We backed off and waited a half mile down the trail for a few more groups of hikers then proceeded through the area making a lot of noise and they were gone. A couple other groups said they saw some bears on that side of the trail too. Once out of the tree line the incline increases until you reach the top. It was windy but the views are beautiful! Not a lot of people up there. We hiked down to no name lake where we camped for the night. There was a moose that was walking around the creek by our campsite. It’s a very beautiful lake about 0.2 miles off the trail to take a break or even a swim. Our last day we finished the last ~5 miles back to the campground. There are a lot of streams and beautiful scenery the entire loop. A lot of hikers do the loop in one day. We enjoyed breaking it up but carrying our packs was strenuous. Definitely recommend doing this trail, but definitely be in a group to avoid any run ins with bears.

Very nice 8 mile easy hike around lake including stops at Aster Falls and Twin Falls, pretty. Saw moose and grouse at start near camp. Beautiful shallow, clear streams with colorful rocks and one fun, bouncy bridge!

In mid July, we took the boat across Two Medicine, then hiked to Twin Falls and stopped for lunch. Our kids (between 8 and 14 years old) had fun climbing the side of the waterfall while we got something to eat.

Continuing up to Upper Two Medicine we saw a moose in the small pond right before the lake. Once at the lake we heard about a grizzly up on the snowpack , but actually saw a black bear near us on the lake’s edge. Make sure to bring bear spray. :)

Overall, it’s a moderate hike that doesn’t get a huge amount of traffic. And just like everywhere else in Glacier, the views are are incredible.

Amazing views and wildlife—8 year olds had no trouble with this hike. Yes, get there early for parking, but more important, for the sunrise over the peaks.

This is an unbelievable hike and is an absolute must do in Glacier Park. As all the hikes we did in this park turned out to be: the trail was longer than All Trails told us it would be. Which the mileage on the signs at the beginning of the trail head was actually accurate to what we ended up recording (not what all trails said it would be). So prepare for longer. This one was 10.6 miles for us.
Seriously though, this trail is unbelievable. Did this one on our 6th day in the park and was better than the Highline trail, avalanche lake, and hidden lake. We saw a huge moose and some bears that day.
DO THIS HIKE EARLY!! We started at 7:30 am and by the time we started heading down, there were TONS of people making their way up. And they were honestly very rude. So avoid the music blaring, ignorant jerks that will bump into you on purpose. Because that's what we got on our way down.

Very very very busy trail. If you're going to do it, I would definitely go early to avoid the people. I'm talking 7:00 am start time. Since the trail starts at Logan Pass, you get a lot of uneducated and unprepared dummies hiking in their pajamas. When we got to the lookout boardwalk (the trail to the lake was closed for bears at the time) there was a ranger snapping at people for getting too close to the mountain goats. People were literally a foot away from a mama and her baby. Unfortunately these animals are extremely habituated to people. The ranger was then happy to tell them of the story of a man being gored to death by a goat in Olympic National Park. Gotta give these animals their space to live in THEIR territory. We are just guests!

Perfect family hike— 8 year olds enjoyed. The waterfalls are beautiful.

hiking
1 day ago

awesome views. we took boat from lodge to save a few miles; you may want to just walk because tough to get return boat (too crowded). if you wait til 5:15 boat guarantees everyone a ride. but beware, we saw bears over the trail. more than 2 hours from boat dock to glacier lake. eat lunch at the lake, not the 'picnic area' below. pit toilet at boat dock and also at top. saw goats and a moose (and bears from boat). this is harder than iceberg lake trail, but not so cold at the top. awesome and doable trail.

Pictures do not do it justice!!! We hiked from Many Glacier hotel to the Grinnell glacier and back, what a hike!
4 hours there and 2 hours back
Plan for an all day adventure!

Smokey and can hardly see the West shoreline of Macdonald lake. Not much to see with the smoke. Relatively easy trail. My 62 year old mother made it up with many breaks and minimal complaints. Not much shade so much more enjoyable earlier in the morning.

We did this hike yesterday with a 9 and 11 year old. It took us 4 hours to hike up and 2 hours to come down. It was quite a hike up but we took our time and the girls did great. There were a few spots that had sharp drop offs but the trail was wide enough to feel safe. We saw moose and goats on the trail and got lots of great pictures. This hike was the best we did in the park. Iceberg Lake was closed due to bear traffic but we heard this one was even better. It was quite impressive and hard to describe. You have gorgeous views the entire time and all I can say is ... wow! This is what you think of when you think of Glacier ... just stunning!

Hiked the trail at the end of July but the trail to the lake was closed up... so sad to hear it was but the views are absolutely beautiful. Not difficult, at least to me to hike, perhaps the beginning where the ramp/sword stairs are since you’re going up can get a bit tiring.

hiking
1 day ago

I hiked this trail on 8/13/2018. The first part of the trail was almost moderate traffic, and the second half was fairly empty.
If you hike the second half (to the lake), it is slightly difficult returning due to the steepness. However, the trail is well kept and resting is a pleasure due to the views.
GORGEOUS views.
Animals: ground squirrels, chipmunks, hoary marmots, mountain goats, grizzly bears.
Yes, grizzly bears! A huge grizzly in the distance during the first third of the hike. Stayed in the area several hours as we saw it going and returning.
We also followed a stream once at the lake and saw a smaller grizzly in a pocket of the stream below (and across) from us. It spun and left after seeing us.
Returning to Hidden Lake, we possibly saw the same grizzly (10-15 mins after first spotting; could have run up the hill) or a different grizzly across the stream from us (20 ft?) eating a fish. (Fish in its mouth as it exited the stream; saw us; stopped and began to eat.)
All in all a tremendous hike in a gorgeous Park.

hiking
2 days ago

We were here visiting from the east entrance right after half the park was closed due to fire on the west side (still a thing...”indefinitely” from a forest ranger) so our trail choices were limited to half the park. BUT this is a fantastic trail. We lucked out that we were “protected” in a valley from the wildfire and actually had pretty non-hazy views.
So there’s a lot of different approaches to this one. You could be a rockstar and do an out and back: that will be about 25 miles.
Also you could do a point-to-point from either trailhead and walk the GTTSR back to your car and add about 2 more miles of an easy, paved walk (we only had to wait about 10min for a shuttle in the afternoon, though)
You could start at Sunrise Gorge and hike to Siyeh Pass trailhead (both off GTTSR) and then shuttle back to your car.
On the advice of others we did Siyeh Pass to Sunrise Gorge and shuttled back to SP.
I’m not sure which I feel is the best... SP to SG was a shorter but more elevated ascent toward the summit (about mile 4-5) and much more forest covered so softer trails.
SG to SP was much more rocky trails, less covered due to past fire clearing and then a slower ascent to the summit.
The downhill we took on the SG side was much harder on the knees due to it being longer (softer ascent) and more rocky. So we would have probably preferred to descend on the SP side if we did it again, BUT we appreciated the steeper but shorter elevation gain on the SP side vs the SG side (get it over with, right?!) ... so all in all I’m going to say what’s better is whatever you prefer. MOST were doing SP to SG but we did meet one wiley older ex park ranger that was going SG to SP (he recommended) and couldn’t figure out why until we got toward the end.

One thing to note whichever way you choose...it’s a beautiful trail. Haven’t done highline yet but this one shouldn’t be missed. Lots of different “environments” to walk through: dense forest, open meadows, rocky summit... And lots of things to see: glacier, waterfall and even the backside of the summit was an amazing view. Also our hike was clocked in at 12.3 miles NOT 10.5 according to the signs. (Took us about 6 hrs with minimal stopping)
If you’re in glacier anytime in August to the end of the season and can’t access the west side, this is an excellent day hike. Shouldn’t be missed for anyone but especially now with the wildfires.

Super easy, beautiful trail through a magical forest with exceptional views of lakes and mountains. The greenery was amazing - I’ve never hiked through anything that lush before. Lots of shade the entire hike. Glacial lake is beautiful. Easy to see Hidden Falls as well on the trail - look for the sign, only 0.3km from the main trail. The trail doesn’t require formal hiking gear or poles. Would make for a great trail run!

Great hike. Highly recommend! Moderate climb; overall worth it! Didn’t see too many people. Hard to park as the Going to the Sun was closed and probably brought more people over to this trail. Lots of Hucks!

Great Hike. One of the best.

backpacking
2 days ago

Climbed, went awwwwww! Hard day.
Started the hike from the Logan pass parking lot. Needed to arrive by 7:15 AM in order to secure parking. Headed out immediately onto the trail. Very busy so want to start as early as possible. The hike is just totally awesome all the way through to the chalet. Once leaving the chalet it is a 4 mile fully sun exposed hike to the shuttle stop. You will want to double your water if you going to do this hike in the summer.

Hiked to Avalanche Lake.
This hike was tied in with the trail of Cedars hike. The old growth trees all the way to the lake are just incredible. There are three different types as you can see in the photographs. A fairly easy hike that can be used as a recovery day between the tough ones.
If you swim in the lake, check your toes when you get out for leeches. The water is not very active so they can find you very easily

A great hike! If I re-did it id come back in September to hike again. In the summer this trail can get hot if you aren't used to high temps. Coming from the SW I am used to it. This trail gives you a bit of everything and is a much less crowded trail if that is what you are looking for. I recommend doing the loop counterclockwise so after all the elevation changes you can stop in at no name lake and take a dip. Bring bug and bear spray!

backpacking
2 days ago

13 hard miles baby!
First hike in Montana. The Grinnell glacier has receded incredibly far. It was basically a thawed out cocktail glass. Incredibly popular hike which can start from the Many Glacier Hotel. There are options to take a boat across the lake shore in the hike. I recommend leaving from the Hotel, walking along the South Shore quietly early morning. You will have to keep your eye out for bear, but if you keep looking to your right you will most likely spot moose. Three moose were spotted in three consecutive lakes on the way to the glacier. The Trail is incredibly popular and crowded. You have to leave early unless you want to be in a parade. I counted 116 people coming up as I was heading down. You will get a good workout out of this. The lunch spot is incredible.

great and easy hike. A good amount of people on it but good none the less. Don't bother with the boat unless you absolutely need it. Seemed like a waste of time walking past people waiting for it.

backpacking
2 days ago

Hiked hard . Swim in the lake baby. Started this hike behind Many Glacier Hotel. Lots of solitude. Not one of the more popular hikes. But let me tell you it is tough. You will have solitude. And you will be so glad that you chose this hike. Most folks choose Grinnell Glacier and miss this one.

crowded, but beautiful

hiking
3 days ago

On Sunday My husband dropped me off at Logan Pass. I was on the trail at 8 am. Spectacular views.the whole Highline Trail to the chalet. Went up Glacier Overlook. I took many breaks coming up. None coming down. Very windy at the overlook. I saw 1 goat and three deer. Got to chalet at 1 pm. I purchased a Gatorade at the chalet and used the pit toilet. A woman 15 minutes ahead of me on the Loop Trail saw a bear. The people ahead of me periodically whooped and yelled “here bear”. I did not see a bear.
I got to the Going to the Sun Road at 2:50 pm, just as a shuttle bus went by. The shuttle buses were only taking 2 people at a time and there were over 10 people in line, in full sun. The line moved more due to people hitch hiking than due to shuttle buses. After waiting an hour, an off duty ranger asked the group a few questions. Then suggested that one person per group get on the shuttle. Then drive their car from Logan Pass to the Loop and pick up the rest of their group. The next shuttle to arrive took 12 people. . .

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