Sebago Lake State Park opened to the public in 1938 as one of the five original state parks. This forested lakeside park is situated on the shore of Maine's deepest and second largest lake which provides year-round recreation for thousands of visitors each year. Near the foothills of the While Mountains, the park's 1,400 acres features sandy beaches, extensive woodlands, ponds, bogs a river and diverse habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal life. Swimming, sport fishing, camping and boating are some of the summer activities enjoyed by visitors. The park's 250-site campground is a popular destination for family vacationers and provides lasting memories season after season. Wooded areas offer a respite from the sun and activity on the beaches. Whether hiking on marked trails or bicycling on park roads, visitors find many way to enjoy the park. Carved by ancient rivers and scoured by Ice Age glaciers, Sebago Lake fills a basin made of granite that has been weathered for millions of year. Thanks to those glaciers, visitors today an enjoy an array of water sports on Maine's 45 square mile lake.

amazing links to trails

hiking
1 month ago

hiking
3 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

trail running
6 months ago

snowshoeing
11 months ago

Sunday, November 13, 2016

walking
Monday, November 07, 2016

canoeing
Friday, October 07, 2016

mountain biking
Friday, October 07, 2016

Thursday, October 06, 2016

When my wife, daughter and I arrived on 07/29/16 to walk the trail, we asked at the lodge's front desk for directions to the trailhead. We were immediately informed that the trails were on private property and for use by lodge guests only.

Having told them that we came across a description of the Migis Lodge trail on the "AllTrails" website, they informed us that the trail we were looking for "was on private property, for lodge guests only and not for use by the general public".

When we told them that the AllTrails website never mentioned that it was not for use by the general public, and that we had driven there in the hope that we would be able to walk the trail, they gave us permission to use the trail "just this once" and even provided us with a trail map.

After crossing the wooden bridge that was posted in a picture by Alan Bourne on the AllTrails website, we were convinced that the trail we were walking was the one we were looking for and the one posted on the website.

5 minutes after crossing the bridge, we came under attack of the most voracious biting insects (mosquitos and deer flies) one could imagine. We immediately reversed direction and ran back to the comfort and safety of our car.

What a horrible experience!

Harold

hiking
Thursday, July 28, 2016

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

hiking
Wednesday, July 27, 2016

mountain biking
Saturday, June 11, 2016

mountain biking
Monday, May 16, 2016

Sunday, April 24, 2016

nice little walk we did it with our dog and a stroller