Located where the Tippecanoe River meets the Wabash near Battle Ground, Indiana, the park's landscape has been shaped by ice from the glaciers, moving water, fire that helped maintain the vast tallgrass prairie and human hands. Native Americans hunted and lived along the two rivers for thousands of years. French trappers and traders found the land teeming with wildlife, and European farmers discovered that the rich, deep prairie soils grew healthy corn and wheat. The park is named for a Native American village located between the rivers established by Tecumseh, who was Shawnee, and his brother Tenskwatawa (The Prophet) in 1808. Tecumseh led his band there from Ohio, where pressure from white settlers had forced him to leave. Tecumseh believed the only way to repel the advance of European settlement was to form an alliance with other tribes. He traveled widely persuading tribes to join his coalition. Over 14 tribes set aside centuries old disputes to stop their common enemy. They met at Prophetstown, and heard The Prophet speak. Tecumseh anticipated their sheer numbers would be enough to stop the westward settlement. William Henry Harrison, the governor of the Indiana Territory, was alarmed by the numbers at Prophetstown and moved 1200 troops to the site while Tecumseh was south gathering additional support. Wanting to avoid a fight, yet fearing an attack, The Prophet decided to strike first in the early morning hours of November 7, 1811. The battle lasted two hours. As darkness faded, the villagers withdrew through the marsh back to Prophetstown and then fled to Wildcat Creek. Harrison's men burned Prophetstown to the ground. Through our unique partnership with Historic Prophetstown, visitors can discover 1920s farm lifestyles and take a stroll through a restored prairie. We are restoring native habitats at Prophetstown, such as wetlands, wet slopes called fens, prairie and open woodlands. We are creating places for you to enjoy the outdoors, with camping, hiking, birding and biking sure to top the list in the months to come.

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