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#33 of 60 national parks in United States of America

Best trails in Indiana Dunes National Park

1,697 Reviews
Looking for a great trail in Indiana Dunes National Park, Indiana? AllTrails has 17 great hiking trails, kid friendly trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 12 easy trails in Indiana Dunes National Park ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 miles and from 603 to 892 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Description

15 miles on the shore of Lake Michigan make up this National Park. Birding, relaxing, hiking, and soaking in the view of bird filled weltlands, praries full of wildflowers, and over 50 miles of trails over the dunes await. For fee info see here: https://www.nps.gov/indu/planyourvisit/fees.htm Visitor Centers have different hours, but all public use areas are open from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. For Visitor Center hours see here: https://www.nps.gov/indu/planyourvisit/hours.htm

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Map of trails in Indiana Dunes National Park
Park information
Acreage:
15,000 acres
Park hours
Monday
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
Tuesday
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
Wednesday
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
Thursday
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
Friday
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
Saturday
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
Sunday
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
Contact
(219) 926-1952
Top trails (17)
#1 - Cowles Bog Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(494)
Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 1 h 52 m
The featured hike is a lollipop shaped trail and a classic of the Indiana dunes. Starting from the north parking lot, hike out back to Mineral Springs Road on the gravel entrance road and pick up the trail across the street. The trail heads along the edge of a wetland with abundant plant and wildlife diversity. At roughly the one-mile mark, you will reach the loop trail junction. The preferred direction around the loop is counterclockwise. Take the trail to the right. The trail will now run through black oak savanna and between interdunal ponds filled with aquatic life. At roughly the 1.5-mile mark, stay to the right at the junction with the cut-off trail. As you near Lake Michigan, you have to climb up and then down the steep final dune. The reward is sweeping views of Lake Michigan and a beach to yourself. Pack a lunch and stay awhile. For the return, travel 0.2 miles to the west on the beach and look for the trail and signs to head back over the dune. Stay right at the cut-off trail junction, left at the Greenbelt trail south parking lot connector and right at the loop trail junction. The trail will now take you back out to the north parking lot. For a slightly shorter and easier journey, take the cut-off trail. This will take a little under a mile off the trail length and avoids the steep dune climbs (but also avoids seeing Lake Michigan). The Cowles Bog loop trail can also be accessed from the south using the Greenbelt Trail at the south parking lot. The Cowles Bog Trail highlights an area of such outstanding plant diversity that it was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1965. This location, where Dr. Henry Cowles conducted much of his early work in plant ecology and succession in the early 1900s, remains an important focus for scientific study today. Explore several distinct habitats along this 4.7-mile trail including ponds, marshes, swamps, black oak savannas and beaches. Steep sand dunes near Lake Michigan make this a very strenuous journey. Many visitors pack a lunch to enjoy at the shoreline while resting for the return trip (don't forget to "pack out" your trash). Make sure to bring plenty of water and sun protection. - Both parking lots open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm - Free (no entrance or parking fees). - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted on a leash (6' or shorter). - Trail is not wheelchair accessible. - Trail surface is mixture of loose sand and packed dirt. - No potable water. - Year-round porta-potties are available at both the north and south parking lots. - The parking lot is gravel and has room for 10 cars (no handicap only spots). Turn right immediately before the town of Dune Acre’s guard shack.Show more
#2 - West Beach - Dune Succession Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(233)
Length: 1.1 mi • Est. 30 m
The Dune Succession Trail (Loop 1) highlights the four stages of dune development within its one-mile length. From the parking lot, follow the road north, toward the lake and look for the trail to pick up to the west of the bathhouse. This scenic, but strenuous, trail includes a climb up 250 stairs for a spectacular view of Lake Michigan and Chicago. Please support restoration effort in the fragile dunes and ponds by remaining on designated trails. West Beach offers a great combination of hiking and relaxing at the beach. The trails are varied and encompass many habitats. There are great views from the top of the Dune Succession Trail stairs, a beautiful pinery of jack pines and birding opportunities. After hiking, relax and swim at the beach. - The parking lots, trails, and beach are open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm Central Time. - An Expanded Amenity Fee is collected daily for every vehicle from the Friday of Memorial Day weekend through Monday of Labor Day weekend from 8:00 am to as late as 7:00 pm Central Time. - $6.00 per vehicle or motorcycle per day, $30.00 per bus per day. - 50% discount for the following America the Beautiful - The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands passes: Senior Annual, Senior Lifetime, and Access Passes. - No discount for the following America the Beautiful - The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands passes: Annual (non-senior), Military, Volunteer, and 4th Grade. - Cash, U.S. checks or credit, debit and gift cards (MasterCard, Visa and Discover) accepted. - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted everywhere on a leash (6' or shorter) with the exception of the lifeguard swimming area, which is maintained from the Friday of Memorial Day weekend through Monday of Labor Day weekend. - The main parking lot has spots for 596 cars and 20 buses and is open year-round. - Trail surface is a combination of loose sand, packed dirt, and sections of stair and boardwalk. - Respect closed area signs; help us restore the dunes. - The removal of rocks, shells, and fossils is strictly prohibited. - There are 8 covered picnic shelters near the West Beach parking lot that are wheelchair accessible. The shelters are reservable at www.recreation.gov starting six months in advance of the desired use date. The reservation is good for day use from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. The shelter reservation does not waive the West Beach car entrance fee collected during the summer months. - Cooking fires at the picnic shelters are permitted in the provided grills or an approved carry-in grill. An approved grill is a noncombustible container with an enclosed bottom and enclosed sides with a minimum depth of 2 inches. Charcoal must be cooled and safely disposed of in a noncombustible container or removed from the area. - There are restroom facilities and potable water available year-round in the contact station. - Seasonal showers, lockers and a beach with lifeguards are available from the Friday of Memorial Day weekend through the Monday of Labor Day weekend. For more information, visit the West Beach webpage. - No littering, hunting, disturbing wildlife or picking plants. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself. - Use insect repellent to help prevent tick bites and related diseases. Conduct a thorough inspection for ticks after your hike. - Avoid the abundant poison ivy along trail edges.Show more
#3 - Little Calumet River and Mnoke Prairie Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(140)
Length: 3.9 mi • Est. 1 h 41 m
This featured hike combines sections from several trails into a perimeter loop hike. Start the hike at the Bailly / Chellberg parking lot and head north on the Bailly Homestead / Chellberg Farm Trail. Just before the Chellberg farm buildings is a trail junction. Proceed straight (north) onto the Little Calumet River / Mnoké Prairie Trail. The Little Calumet Trail will wind through a small scenic ravine that has some sections of stairs. After a third of a mile, stay left at the junction with the Bailly Cemetery Trail. Note that a 0.6-mile round trip out and back extension can be added by hiking up to the Bailly Cemetery and back. Shortly after the cemetery trail is a junction with a connector trail. Stay to the right. Next up, the trail will join the paved Porter Brickyard Trail. Follow the paved trail to the left until the hiking trail veers right off the paved trail. Take the hiking path. Cross Howe Road and follow the trail through mature forests. At roughly the 1.3-mile mark from the parking lot, stay right at an unmarked trail junction. The trail will make its way down to the Little Calumet River. Just before the river, avoid a closed trail by staying right. After crossing the boardwalk and bridge, the trail will open up into the Mnoké Prairie. After nearly a mile in the prairie, the trail pass by a closed trail on the left and end up in an alternate parking lot. Walk down the entrance road, pick up Howe Road north long enough to cross back over the river and up the driveway of the Bailly Homestead. Lastly, hike north through the homestead and pick up the trail to the northeast back to the parking lot. The Little Calumet River, Mnoké Prairie, Bailly Homestead, Chellberg Farm and Bailly Cemetery trail system reveals the rich natural diversity that has drawn people to this area for over 10,000 years. Hike through a forest dominated by maple, beech, basswood and oak trees. Follow a stretch of the Little Calumet River, once a critical transportation route for early regional travelers and explore the recently restored Mnoké Prairie for a glimmer of the vast stretches of pre-settlement grasslands. Explore the historic Bailly Homestead and Chellberg Farm. - Open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - Free (no access fee). - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted on a leash (6' or shorter). - There are 3 covered picnic shelters near the parking lot that are wheelchair accessible. The shelters are reservable at www.recreation.gov starting six months in advance of the desired use date. The reservation is good for day use from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - Alcohol is permitted when used responsibly. - Cooking fires at the picnic shelters are permitted in the provided grills or an approved carry-in grill. An approved grill is a noncombustible container with an enclosed bottom and enclosed sides with a minimum depth of 2 inches. Charcoal must be cooled and safely disposed of in a noncombustible container or removed from the area. - Trails are not wheelchair accessible. - Information board at the trailhead. - Trail surface is packed dirt and wood chips with some section of stairs. - Year-round restrooms and potable water at the Bailly / Chellberg parking lot. - Parking lot is large enough for buses. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself; respect closed area signs. - Wear adequate footwear. The trail can be muddy and slippery near the Little Calumet River. The morning dew can also be heavy in the prairie section of the trail. - Use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and tuck long pants into socks to avoid ticks and poison ivy. Conduct a thorough inspection for ticks after your hike.Show more
#4 - West Beach 3-Loop Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(112)
Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 1 h 33 m
The hike starts with the Dune Succession Trail (Loop 1) which highlights the four stages of dune development. This part of the trail is only ~0.6 miles long but includes a strenuous climb up 250 stairs for a spectacular view of Lake Michigan and Chicago. Support the restoration effort in the fragile dunes and ponds, or pannes, by remaining on designated trails. The hike then picks up the West Beach Trail (Loop 2) for an easy hike through an area that was sand mined in the 1920s. The footing is mainly loose sand. This area is being restored as an oak savanna and is a great place to see prickly pear cactus. Birders will enjoy looking for water birds on Long Lake from the viewing platform. The final section of the hike is the Long Lake Loop Trail (Loop 3). This section is moderate in difficulty. The trail follows along Long Lake and then heads into the dunes. There is a great view of Long Lake after the initial climb. After crossing the entrance road, the trail winds through the undulating dunes and then has a steep descent into the picnic area and back to the parking lot. West Beach offers a great combination of hiking and relaxing at the beach. The trails are varied and encompass many habitats. There are great views from the top of the Dune Succession Trail stairs, a beautiful pinery of jack pines, birding opportunities along Long Lake and secluded sections of forest. After hiking, relax and swim at the beach. - The parking lots, trails, and beach are open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm Central Time. - An Expanded Amenity Fee is collected daily for every vehicle from the Friday of Memorial Day weekend through Monday of Labor Day weekend from 8:00 am to as late as 7:00 pm Central Time. - $6.00 per vehicle or motorcycle per day, $30.00 per bus per day. - 50% discount for the following America the Beautiful - The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands passes: Senior Annual, Senior Lifetime, and Access Passes. - No discount for the following America the Beautiful - The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands passes: Annual (non-senior), Military, Volunteer, and 4th Grade. - Cash, U.S. checks or credit, debit and gift cards (MasterCard, Visa and Discover) accepted. - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted everywhere on a leash (6' or shorter) with the exception of the lifeguard swimming area, which is maintained from the Friday of Memorial Day weekend through Monday of Labor Day weekend. - The main parking lot has spots for 596 cars and 20 buses and is open year-round. - Trail surface is a combination of loose sand, packed dirt, and sections of stair and boardwalk. - Respect closed area signs; help us restore the dunes. - The removal of rocks, shells, and fossils is strictly prohibited. - There are 8 covered picnic shelters near the West Beach parking lot that are wheelchair accessible. The shelters are reservable at www.recreation.gov starting six months in advance of the desired use date. The reservation is good for day use from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. The shelter reservation does not waive the West Beach car entrance fee collected during the summer months. - Cooking fires at the picnic shelters are permitted in the provided grills or an approved carry-in grill. An approved grill is a noncombustible container with an enclosed bottom and enclosed sides with a minimum depth of 2 inches. Charcoal must be cooled and safely disposed of in a noncombustible container or removed from the area. - There are restroom facilities and potable water available year-round in the contact station. - Seasonal showers, lockers and a beach with lifeguards are available from the Friday of Memorial Day weekend through the Monday of Labor Day weekend. For more information, visit the West Beach webpage. - No littering, hunting, disturbing wildlife or picking plants. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself. - Use insect repellent to help prevent tick bites and related diseases. Conduct a thorough inspection for ticks after your hike. - Avoid the abundant poison ivy along trail edges.Show more
#5 - Paul H. Douglas (Miller Woods) Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(100)
Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 30 m
The featured hike is essentially an out and back trail. Starting from the Paul H. Douglas Center, take the trail north or counterclockwise around the wetland complex. Look for wildlife including beavers. The trail will run west along the top of the wetland. At the trail junction, take a right and follow the trail to the north. The trail from this point is an out and back to the beach. The trail features beautiful scenery with small interdunal ponds nestled among oak savanna covered dunes teeming with wildflowers in the spring and summer. Once you cross the bridge over the Grand Calumet River, the landscape changes dramatically into a world of towering sand dunes. The trail winds around and through the dunes all the way the shore of Lake Michigan. After enjoying the lake, follow the trail back to the junction at the wetland complex. Follow the trail to the right along the wetland back to the Paul H. Douglas Center. The trail surface is mostly sand with some sections of packed soil, gravel or boardwalk. The hike will take longer than you think due the loose footing of walking in the sand. The trail starts in relative shade but ends in the full sun. Please bring plenty of water, sun protection and dress in layers. The weather on the beach can be dramatically colder or hotter than in the woods. The Paul H. Douglas (Miller Woods) Trail winds through several habitats including wetlands, globally rare black oak savanna, open dunes and beach. The views of the lake and the dunes are incredible. The oak savanna's native grasses and wildflowers, including lupine, thrive in the sunlight and open forest floor. Please stay single file on the narrow trail to protect yourself from the abundant poison ivy along the trail edges as well as the fragile lupine habitat. - The trail system and parking lot are open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - The Paul H. Douglas Center for Environmental Education is open daily, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, from the Friday of Memorial Day weekend through the Monday of Labor Day weekend. The center is open daily, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, for the remainder of the year. - Free (no access fee). - The parking lot is paved and has 40 spots. - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted on a leash (6' or shorter). - Trail surface is mostly loose sand with some sections of packed dirt and there is a boardwalk over the marsh. - Stay off marram grass. - Respect closed area signs; help us restore the dunes. - Year-round restrooms and potable water are available in the Paul H. Douglas Center during open hours. - No littering, hunting, disturbing wildlife or picking plants. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself. - Prevent tick bites and related diseases by using insect repellent. Conduct a thorough inspection for ticks after your hike.Show more
#6 - Tolleston Dunes Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(103)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 17 m
This featured hike is a lollipop shaped trail. Starting at the parking lot trailhead, the trail starts out in what was once a sand mining operation. This is why the parking lot and surrounding area are so flat. After roughly a third of a mile, the trail enters the rolling ancient sand dunes of Lake Michigan. The footing is generally good with some sections of sand. At the loop trail junction, follow the trail to the right. The trail wind will up and down through oak savanna and wetland habitats. Shortly after the boardwalk (roughly the one-mile mark), you will reach the cut-off trail junction. Staying to the right will take you on the outer loop (2.9 miles total distance). Taking the left trail will cut 0.8 miles off the hike (total hike distance of 2.1 miles). The recommended route is the outer loop. At the two-mile mark, stay to the right at the cut-off trail junction. Finally, at the loop trail junction, stay right again and hike back to the parking lot. The Tolleston Dunes Trail winds amid 4,700-year-old sand dunes that were formed when Lake Michigan’s water level was 25 feet higher than today. Tolleston is the second youngest of four distinct dune systems found within the national park. Together these dune ridges provide a glimpse into the changing shoreline of Lake Michigan. Tolleston Dunes has varied habitats ranging from oak savanna to wetlands and plants such as prickly pear cactus, butterfly weed and lupines. In winter, this trail is a popular spot for cross-country skiers looking for a more challenging experience. - Open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - Free (no entrance or parking fees). - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted on a leash (6' or shorter). - The main trail is not wheelchair accessible. - The marsh overlook is wheelchair accessible. - Formerly known as the Inland Marsh trail. - There are picnic tables at the marsh overlook. First come, first served. No advance reservations. No cooking fires allowed. - Trail surface is mostly loose sand with some sections of packed dirt. - No restrooms or potable water. - The main trailhead parking lot is paved and has 19 spots (2 spots are handicap only). - The marsh overlook parking lot is paved and has 4 spots (1 spot is handicap only). - The trail is never crowded and is a great way to get away from the summer beach crowds. - In the winter, this trail is popular for cross-country skiers looking for a more challenging experience. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself. - Use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and tuck long pants into socks to avoid ticks and poison ivy.Show more
#7 - Dune Ridge Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(83)
Length: 0.7 mi • Est. 20 m
The featured hike is a lollipop shaped trail. From the parking lot trailhead, head south with a short tour through a foredune complex on sandy soil. It transitions into an oak savanna with a more stable soil structure, which provides better footing. At the junction with the loop trail, turn left to hike the loop in the clockwise direction. The loop starts on an old roadbed and you will need to turn right to leave the wide road onto single track. The trail will climb to the top of the dune offering sweeping views of the Great Marsh. Follow the trail along the ridge line before hiking down a steep section of loose sand. The trail will wind back to the loop junction. At the junction, turn left and follow the trail north to the parking lot. The 0.7-mile Dune Ridge Trail offers great views of the extensive wetlands and forests south of this tall, forested dune. The different habitats you'll see along the trail help make Indiana Dunes National Park the fourth most biologically diverse of all National Parks. - Open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - Free (no entrance or parking fee). - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted on a leash (6' or shorter). - Trails are not wheelchair accessible. - Trail surface is loose sand with some sections of packed dirt. - Seasonal restrooms and potable water from mid-April through mid-November. - The trail head is at the Kemil Beach lot has 81 spots and will fill up quickly on summer weekends. - Visit Kemil Beach for swimming and other beach activities. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself. - Use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and tuck long pants into socks to avoid ticks and poison ivy. Show more
#8 - Mount Baldy Beach Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(64)
Length: 0.9 mi • Est. 25 m
The Mount Baldy Beach Trail is an out and back trail that can be extended by walking along the beach in either direction. The trail offers sweeping views of Lake Michigan and the Chicago skyline in the distance. The hike features rolling terrain through the woods with a steep scurry down the face of the dune to the beach. During high waves, it may not be possible to hike along the beach. Please use caution. - The Mount Baldy Beach Trail is open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - Use caution when visiting Mount Baldy. The dune and shoreline are in a constant state of change from the weather and changing lake levels. Obey all trail markers and warning signs to be safe. The summit of Mt. Baldy remains closed except for ranger-led programs. - The final approach to the beach is quite steep on loose sand. It may be difficult to climb back up to the established trail. - In the winter, never walk out onto the shelf ice. The ice may not be stable, and it is possible to fall through the ice. - Free (no entrance or parking fee). - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets are permitted on a leash (6' or shorter). - Trail is not wheelchair accessible. - Trail surface is loose sand. You will get sand in your shoes or boots. - There are year-round restrooms and a potable water source. - The lot is paved and holds 80 cars and three buses. - The Summit Trail has Restricted Access. Access to the Mount Baldy Summit Trail requires accompaniment by authorized staff. There are ranger-led daytime and sunset hikes on weekends in the summer and at other times throughout the year. Hike dates and times are on the park's website calendar and Facebook page. Tour details can also be obtained at the Indiana Dunes Visitor Center at (219) 395-1882. Show more
#9 - Heron Rookery Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(65)
Length: 3.2 mi • Est. 1 h 18 m
The featured hike starts from the east parking lot. The hike is a simple out and back. Follow the trail from the east parking lot to the west parking lot and back. The trail surface is packed dirt and clay, which can make this trail very slippery when wet. Wear adequate footwear. In spring, before the trees leaf out, the woodlands along this trail are blanketed with the most extensive display of spring wildflowers in the national park. Trillium, spring beauties and Dutchman's breeches are just a few of the flowers you'll see along this trail. Fishing is also popular during the spring and fall when salmon and trout are making their spawning runs from Lake Michigan into the Little Calumet River. Indiana state fishing regulations apply. The Heron Rookery Trail follows along a portion of the Little Calumet River that once featured over 100 Great Blue Heron nests. After 60 years of nesting here, the herons have moved on to new nesting grounds. These woods remain alive with dozens of bird species including kingfishers, woodpeckers and a wide variety of migrating and nesting warblers. In spring, before the trees leaf out, the woodlands along this trail are blanketed with the most extensive display of spring wildflowers in the national park. Trillium, spring beauties and Dutchman's breeches are just a few of the flowers you'll see along this trail from late April through mid-May. Fishing is also popular during the spring and fall when salmon and trout are making their spawning runs from Lake Michigan into the Little Calumet River. Indiana state fishing regulations apply. - Open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - Free (no entrance or parking fees). - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Pets permitted on a leash (6' or shorter). - Trail is not wheelchair accessible. - Trail surface is packed dirt and clay. - No restrooms or potable water. - The main (east) parking lot holds 20 cars and is large enough for buses & RV's to park. - The alternate (west) parking lot has room for only 4 cars. - Wear adequate footwear as the trail can be muddy and slippery in sections. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself. - Mosquitoes are abundant along this trail in the summer. - Use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and tuck long pants into socks to avoid ticks and poison ivy.Show more
#10 - Glenwood Dunes Trail
Indiana Dunes National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(67)
Length: 6.7 mi • Est. 2 h 49 m
Note: As of June 2020, users have reported that the northern part of this loop is currently closed. The featured loop hike is equestrian friendly and also a favorite of cross-country skiers. Park at the Glenwood Dunes parking lot located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 20 and Brummitt Road. Bring a trail map as the route has too many trail junctions and cut-offs to fully describe here. From the trailhead, hike in a counterclockwise direction and take care when crossing roads. At the east end of the loop, take the short cut-off to avoid the Calumet Dunes Paved Trail (Note that it is a short hike to the Calumet Dunes parking lot if restroom or potable water is desired). After the cut-off, follow the trail west along U.S. Highway 12 before heading south the western-most point of the trail. Do not take the Glenwood dunes Extension Trail. Instead, follow the loop trail back to the north and then east to the parking lot. The hike can be extended by adding the Calumet Dunes Paved Trail, Dunewood Trace Campground Trail and Glenwood Dunes Extension Trail for a total hike distance of nearly 15 miles. This extensive trail system features interconnected loops ranging from less than a mile to nearly 15 miles and is popular with hikers, runners, horseback riders and cross-country skiers. In addition to the Glenwood Dunes Trail, the 4.4-mile round trip Dunewood Trace Campground Trail connects the Glenwood Dunes trail system to the National Park’s Dunewood Campground to the east. The 2.6-mile round trip Glenwood Dunes Extension Trail connects the system to the Dune Park South Shore Railroad Station to the west. In the center, it connects to the Calumet Dunes Paved Trail. The trail surface is a mixture of packed dirt, loose sand and some sections of boardwalk. Bring a trail map, as there are 13 trail junctions. The trail system is accessible from either the Glenwood Dunes or Calumet Dunes parking lot. - Open daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. - The Glenwood Dunes parking lot is large enough for horse trailers. - Horses are not permitted on any of the surrounding roads. - Free (no access fee). - Bicycles and motorized vehicles are not allowed. - Bring a trail map when using this trail system. - There are 13 trail junctions; pay attention to where you are. - Formerly known as the Ly-co-ki-we trail. - Pets are not permitted on the equestrian portion of the Glenwood Dunes Trail. - Pets are permitted on a leash (6' or shorter) on the other sections of the trail system. - There are covered picnic shelters at the Glenwood Dunes parking lot. First come, first served. No advance reservations. Wheelchair accessible. - Cooking fires at the picnic shelters are permitted in the provided grills or an approved carry-in grill. An approved grill is a noncombustible container with an enclosed bottom and enclosed sides with a minimum depth of 2 inches. Charcoal must be cooled and safely disposed of in a noncombustible container or removed from the area. - The Glenwood Dunes Trail is not wheelchair accessible. - The Calumet Dunes Paved Trail is wheelchair accessible. - The Glenwood Dunes Trail surface is a combination of loose sand and packed dirt. - There are restroom facilities and potable water available year-round at both parking lots. - Horseback riding is permitted on the Glenwood Dunes Trail only from March 16 - December 14. However, if there is sufficient snow cover for cross-country skiing (3 inches or more) before December 15 or after March 15, the trail will remain closed to horseback riding. Horses are prohibited in the winter to prevent accidents with skiers on the trail. - Visitors must provide their own horses or ski equipment. - Skiers and horseback riders should complete the Glenwood Dunes Trail in a counterclockwise fashion to allow for one-way traffic. - Stay on the trail to protect the wildlife and yourself. - Use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and tuck long pants into socks to avoid ticks and poison ivy. - Mosquitoes can be bad in the summer.Show more
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