Explore the most popular trails in Bruneau-Jarbidge Rivers Wilderness with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

The United States Congress designated the Bruneau-Jarbidge Rivers Wilderness in 2009 and it now has a total of 89,777 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Idaho and is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The Jarbidge-Bruneau Rivers Wilderness has some of the best class V whitewater that Idaho has to offer. The Jarbidge River offers a remote and challenging 29-mile float trip taking boaters through a maze of spectacular canyons, "hoo-doo" rock spires, junipers and red volcanic cliffs. The Bruneau River flows north from headwaters in the northern Nevada mountains and is known for its sheer-walled, rocky canyons and whitewater boating opportunities. The 50-mile long Bruneau River begins at the confluence of the Jarbidge River and the West Fork Bruneau River. In the wilderness, plateaus are divided by deep, winding river canyons and provide habitats for sensitive species including bighorn sheep, redband trout, bobcat and river otter.

hiking
Thursday, June 14, 2018

This was a great trail for us on this beautiful day in June. The daytime temp was 79 degrees and no clouds in site. A good thing considering the road out to the trailhead would be impassable in our rear-wheel drive, high clearance van in a fair amount of rain. There are a lot of rocks and uneven places to slow you down. The van was rockin'. Our last trail hike was in southern Utah with the hoards of people in the national parks so this was a welcome change from that. It looked like no one had been out there in weeks. The trip down is steep but not bad. It looks ominous but as long as you pay attention you should be good. Once we got to the river there was a cool breeze. Big rocks in the river offer a place to soak the feet and look for wildlife. As other reviews warned, there was a lot of poison ivy. There is not much room to move around and the water was still fairly high. On the way out we did see a snake but after checking we think it was a gopher snake. All in all it was a difficult hike but very doable in 3 hours. The perfect conditions helped to with the hike and the drive in. We look forward to doing it again.

hiking
Wednesday, May 09, 2018

This is the only trail I know that goes to the bottom of Bruneau Canyon. From the overlook, it is another 20 miles or so on a very rough dirt road - only high clearance vehicles should attempt it. The trail itself is mostly well-managed, although one section was washed out and required some moderate scrambling when I hiked it in August of 2017. The trail switchbacks down the east side of the canyon down to the river. Be careful around the river, as poison ivy grows abundantly. If you scramble over the rocks to your left at the bottom, you can wade into the shallow part of the river and further up the canyon. Schools of red band trout are prevalent in the warm waters.