hiking

walking

dogs on leash

views

nature trips

forest

birding

wild flowers

wildlife

camping

kid friendly

trail running

river

mountain biking

backpacking

waterfall

dog friendly

fishing

lake

The Cohutta Wildlife Management Area is a huge area of forest in north Georgia, of more than 95,000 acres. This site covers only a small area along good gravel roads in the southern part of the WMA, but the whole area is worth exploring for those with the time and curiosity. This WMA is encompassed within Georgia's Cohutta Wilderness area, which is the state's second largest wilderness area. The Cohutta Mountains are part of the oldest known mountains in the world. They run from Fannin County northeast to the Tennessee-North Carolina border, where they are known as the Smoky Mountains, and once bordered a prehistoric ocean. It is from these mountains that the Cohutta WMA gets its name. In May 2003, the Mall of Georgia Partners donated this 88-acre tract as a wetlands/wildlife preserve to the Georgia Wildlife Federation. GWF volunteers and most notably, Eagle Scouts, have been instrumental in developing the trail and maintaining the property. The nature area itself lies within a basin formed by Ivy Creek and its tributary, Little Ivy Creek. Located below street level within the the I-85 / GA20 interchange and the Mall of Georgia Boulevard, traffic sounds from the nearby mall and freeway are muffled. Although the Ivy Creek Greenway connects with the trail, the most direct access is by using the stairs located off the Mall of Ga Blvd (GPS 34.062015, -83.982970). The nature preserve has an almost surreal look about it. Its look not only changes with the seasons but is also greatly influenced throughout the year by the amount of precipitation. The boardwalks and trail structures keep things interesting along the way. I highly recommend this trail for children. Just remember to take water and relieve yourself before you venture out, as there are no fountains or restrooms here.

Easy hike about .5 mile to the falls but we kept going for a little ways. Easy but pretty hike very much worth it if your ever in the area.

nature trips
2 days ago

The BMTA volunteers did an amazing job on this Re-route! So clean and beautiful! It was so nice to be the only ones there! Peaceful and serene to just sit and listen to the sound of the water, birds and leaves blowing in the slight breeze! Thank you!

3 days ago

Nice trail little muddy good visibility on trail and easy to follow markers, not much for photos to dense over all very enjoyable.

Nice hike. We combined it with Stanley Gap. The falls are great. Be careful if at the top, a young man slipped and fell when we were there. Several people at the falls, but that should be expected, especially in the summer.

Significant storm damage has portions of these trails closed. On 8/11/18- 40+ volunteers cleared 8 miles of trails, this being a wilderness area means we can only use hand tools (crosscut saws and sling blades etc). Still some sections are closed due to damage from flooding. Reading below there is a misconception that forest service personal maintain these trails, the FS has only a few trail techs that cover large swaths of forest so they rely heavily on volunteer organizations to keep the trails marked and clear. Anyone interested in volunteering should contact their local ranger station or a local trail maintenance group, in this case Kevin Vasilinda from the FS teamed up with members of the Benton Mackaye Trail Association, Southern Appalachian backcountry Horsemen and the Conasauga trail volunteers to clear a lot of downed trees.

We love this trail.

Beautiful hike along the river that’s nice and secluded. I would recommend you have some agility skills because there are a number of trees down across the trail. After this hike we walked north for several miles on the road along the Tallulah River.... a beautiful hike as well and no trees to climb over.

I've been away from hiking for a few years but I've recently retired and moved to the north Georgia mountains and plan to do a lot more hiking now. This hike is my first Georgia peak in the Georgia 4000 Challenge. It was a pretty easy summit, trail to the top and only 2 miles (one way). Trip reports indicate great views, and there were some, but I would recommend this mountain in the fall for the colors or in the winter for the best views. We started at the state maintained parking lot, 1/4 mile north of Mountain Crossings. The way up starts on Byron Reese Trail. There is a plaque with a poem from Bryon near the start, but I think Mr. Reese is more famous for his peanut butter cups than his poetry :-). The Bryon Reese Trail connects to the white blazed Appalachian Trail about 7/10th of mile up the mountain and you can just follow the AT to the top. You'll see a USGS Benchmark in a rock at the top.

hiking
8 days ago

Simple walking path with a small creek that crosses it. I liked the many mushrooms/toadstools along the trail, but maybe much better as a biking trail.

Beautiful narrow trail, a spur off the AT leading to Whitley Shelter. A little overgrown, but well worth the hike. After leaving the AT we didn’t see another soul other than two campers at the shelter. Nice waterhole about .3 mile behind the shelter.

This app says "out and back" with the miles. Does that mean TOTAL hike miles, or it is ONE WAY hike miles?

hiking
11 days ago

Nice well maintained trail but I’d recommend hitting it thru the week. If you only have time on the weekends plan on arriving early to avoid the bike traffic and even then keep you head on a swivel! Otherwise it’s not a bad trail for a short day hike.

hiking
13 days ago

Great fun for the whole family.

13 days ago

So so more for biking

This is one of the best parks around. I love coming here and the hiking is fun.

on Songbird Trail

14 days ago

A very pleasant and easy hike through the forest. Small elevation gain. I am working with an injury, and it was a good start to my return to hiking.

Note there are 11 miles of gravel road to get to the campground, but was well worth it to us. We're planning to return to camp on the lake!

hiking
17 days ago

Great strenuous workout with sections of steep terrain. If you’re heading to Jack River Falls by way of this trail make sure to start your hike early.

The trail is actually 8.5 miles (Website), and challenging beginners. We missed the right turn on Duncan Ridge trail and made a right on a blue trail walking a mile in a half off trail to Bird Gap. We had to turnaround to get back on course. Loved the hike, I would do it again, but taking my time not to missed the right turn.

Right near the beginning of the trail, just on the other side of the road crossing, there is a large fallen tree and a number of smaller chainsawed trees jumbled together. It looks very much like the path is intentionally blocked off, but just climb over/through it. Once you start ascending, the climb is relentless — be prepared for that. It’s not steep, but it continues for over two miles with no break. There are some flat areas off the trail before and after the main waterfall (at about the halfway point) that would make great camping spots, and really are the only spots suitable for tents. There is a fire ring on the summit, and several trees perfect for hanging a hammock — I napped for a couple hours before heading down again. It was a great way to spend the afternoon.

Definitely a bit muddy right now but the waterfalls are amazing and that view at the top is worth the last mile and a half. Be ready to climb over some fallen trees (worst one is at the very beginning). Bring a bunch of water and snacks/lunch. It’s pretty shaded for the most part and some areas look very snakey but I didn’t see any wildlife except birds and lizards. I lost cell service until close to the top so download the map!

woo! This one kicked my ass. Dad and I took the pup. I'd say the first and last mile are the most difficult. if you're going post rain where some boots with good tread. Bring about 2L water. Stay hydrated. we didn't as much as we should have and we are definitely feeling that today. It is a really pretty hike and if you go mid-Summer, expect to see lots of lush green forest and plenty of mushrooms. There's a pool at the bottom of the falls for the way back to stop and have some lunch and soak your feet. Reviving! The view at the top is beautiful and there are camping spots set in from the view and also near the falls.

Wide gravel road all the way from the road to the radio towers on top. Much litter and trash steadily piling up, but look past that to the forest and the rocks and the vistas. The overgrown house beneath the power lines marks where the road starts climbing steeply up Currahee. Lots of unimaginative graffiti at the top (compare with the School Bus Graveyard on 365), and the high frequency sounds near the towers might bleed into your meditation time while enjoying eastern horizon gazing. The western side of the mountain has anchors for rappelling and nooks for climbing. Combine the Sink Trail with the Currahee trail on the southeastern side and you have a nice workout.

The map is a little out of date, just before the peak there are a number of switchbacks to the south side of the peak, thank God.

Beautiful falls. Great for family photos. But can be quite crowded. Nice little hike. Can be steep in some sections but nothing too difficult.

Quite easy trail but overgrown with vegetation not maintained .

Tough for some but a must for most.

hiking
23 days ago

Does anyone know the Hickory Ridge Trail is is still maintained? We looked desperately for it this weekend and never saw a signpost. We found what appeared to be an old trail or roadbed but it was hopelessly overgrown.

Short trail with good waterfall. Was great for my 9 year old and 2 Jack Russell’s. Watch out for stinging insects, my son was stung twice by hornets.

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