hiking

walking

views

nature trips

forest

birding

wild flowers

wildlife

trail running

kid friendly

camping

dogs on leash

river

mountain biking

waterfall

backpacking

dog friendly

fishing

lake

The Cohutta Wildlife Management Area is a huge area of forest in north Georgia, of more than 95,000 acres. This site covers only a small area along good gravel roads in the southern part of the WMA, but the whole area is worth exploring for those with the time and curiosity. This WMA is encompassed within Georgia's Cohutta Wilderness area, which is the state's second largest wilderness area. The Cohutta Mountains are part of the oldest known mountains in the world. They run from Fannin County northeast to the Tennessee-North Carolina border, where they are known as the Smoky Mountains, and once bordered a prehistoric ocean. It is from these mountains that the Cohutta WMA gets its name.

Took my boys (14 & 12) with me and finished in the hike in 2 days, We went over Father's Day weekend and had a blast. Truth be told, I think we may have been the only people on the trail that weekend. We saw absolutely nobody else the entire time. This trail is rated as MODERATE but it was a little on the challenging side - at least for us it was. The trail itself wasn't particularly arduous but it wasn't well marked either. For the most part though, the trail is readily apparent. Ac couple of good points to know...
1. The trail itself isn't terribly steep or difficult, but there were a LOT of downed trees across it.
2. You only need ONE water bottle per person. We hiked the loop EAST to WEST and there is no water until the river crossing/first campsite at the apex of the big loop at the North Eastern side of the trail. After that, you are almost always in contact with the Jacks River. Bring filtration and a bottle. That will do just fine.
3. Bears... They are out there and had one in our campsite the first night. It didn't do anything and left without incident. Neat see though. Definitely keep your food in a bear canister and away from the camp.
4. There is NO cell service if you are on Verizon. Not a big deal to me, but since I had my kids with me, it was a "daddy-level" concern. It might be smart to have an ACR or SPOT just in case.
5. It had been raining hard for the previous week and rained frequently on our trip. The river was UP and the crossings were averaging adult waist deep. The water is pleasantly cold and wonderfully clear. But the current was nothing to take lightly - especially with kids.
6. Trekking poles are awesome! They made river crossings a lot more pleasant (and safer for the kids) and they were also great for making sure snakes weren't under logs that we had to climb over to navigate the trail.
7. Temperatures dropped to the 60s at night with a breeze and rain. We slept in hammocks (Warbonnet Blackbirds) and lined the bottom with a closed cell foam pad. Sleeping clothes were shorts/shirt a camping pillow and woobie (military poncho liner). It was just fine - perhaps a little cool, but I'd pack the same way again.
8. Ticks. Lonestar ticks are everywhere. Treat your clothes with permethrin before you go. It will help. And wear a hat. Otherwise the bugs were fine. Perhaps it was a function of all the rain, but mosquitos and other flying pests weren't a major issue.

Beautiful, quiet, and lots of fun! I can't wait to return!

Small area fun for exploring!

3 days ago

hiking
6 days ago

hiking
8 days ago

We could not find the trail. We asked the campers and no one knew. Would be nice to have a trail head marked. We went down several trails all the were the wrong trail. we would love to go back if I could just find it. Does anyone have any info for me?

Tropical Storm Irma had an impact on the N Georgia mountains. Lots of down trees and brush across the trail throughout the duration of the hike. Beautiful day for a hike, 74 and Sunshine, low humidity and breezy. Great hike, just watch for a lot of natures debris on the trail.

on Arkaquah Trail

14 days ago