Best stroller friendly trails in Tahoe National Forest, California

613 Reviews
Explore the most popular stroller friendly trails in Tahoe National Forest with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of stroller friendly trails in Tahoe National Forest, California
Park information
Park hours
Monday
12:00 am - 12:00 am
Tuesday
12:00 am - 12:00 am
Wednesday
12:00 am - 12:00 am
Thursday
12:00 am - 12:00 am
Friday
12:00 am - 12:00 am
Saturday
12:00 am - 12:00 am
Sunday
12:00 am - 12:00 am
Helpful links
Top trails (5)
#1 - Joshua M. Hardt Memorial Trail
Tahoe National Forest
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Length: 4.0 mi • Est. 1 h 54 m
The Joshua M. Hardt Memorial Trail is a 4-mile trail encircling Sugar Pine Reservoir that can be accessed from Sugar Pine Dam, Sugar Pine Boat Ramp parking area, or Manzanita Day Use Area. Hiking and mountain biking are allowed but no motorized or equestrian use. There is a $5 parking fee at the boat ramp and the picnic area from May to September. Following along the Lake, once you cross Shirttail Creek, the trail winds between plenty of spots for fishing or swimming. There is one more bridge, over Forbes Creek, before passing the boat ramp and traveling about one mile to the dam. The trail will bring you back to the picnic area. Accessibility: Beginning in the picnic area at the north end of the lake, the first mile of the trail to the Shirttail Creek Bridge along the eastern shore is navigable for wheelchairs/mobility equipment and strollers before the grade begins to steepen and the trail surface changes from paved to a dirt surface with some rocks. This part of the trail also has an interpretive brochure available in the box during the summer months or at the Ranger Station. The paved section is typically at least four feet wide with a mostly gentle estiamted grade of 5% or less.Show more
#2 - Truckee River Trail
Tahoe National Forest
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Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 3 h 9 m
A peaceful, paved, multi-use trail that follows the Truckee River between Truckee and Tahoe City. Accessibility: The trail surface is paved and it is typically at least five feet wide. It is mostly gentle except for a moderately steep section where the estimated grade is between 5% and 8% between 5.4 and 5.7 miles when going north/west. Equipment users may need assistance there.Show more
#3 - Sierra Discovery Trail
Tahoe National Forest
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Length: 0.8 mi • Est. 21 m
The Sierra Discovery Trail loop is an interesting and easy interpretive trail, explaining the geology and ecology of the Bear Valley and the Sierra Nevada. The trail starts out as pavement and then crosses a bridge over Bear River. To get to Bear River Falls, go left after Bear River bridge, and you'll see the falls shortly on your left. After seeing the waterfall, continue on the loop trail back around to the parking lot. Accessibility: The trail surface is paved/boardwalk and typically at least four feet wide. The grade is mostly gentle, all estimated to be 6% or less.Show more
#4 - Pine Drop Trail
Tahoe National Forest
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Length: 2.5 mi • Est. 1 h 6 m
A beautiful gentle paved trail through national forest that ends at an outdoor rec center. There is a $5 parking fee. Accessibility: The trail surface is paved and typically at least four feet wide. The grade is mostly gentle (all estimated 5% or less) so most wheelchair and stroller users will likely be able to navigate the trail.Show more
#5 - Olympic Village via Squaw Valley Bike Trail
Tahoe National Forest
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Length: 2.2 mi • Est. 53 m
The term squaw is considered universally offensive by Indigenous groups in America due to its use for hundreds of years in a derogatory context. Indigenous activists have continued to work both locally and in more general educational efforts, to rename the locations across North America that contain the slur, as well as to eliminate the slur from the lexicon in general. See here for more info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squaw#Efforts_to_rename_placenames_and_terms_with_squaw_in_them According to Access Northern CA (http://accessnca.org/access-northern-california/explore/explore-detail-view/?site_id=213): This asphalt trail, separated from the roadway, runs moderately uphill through Squaw Valley to the ski resort where you can enjoy a spacious pedestrian village with a variety of stores and restaurants. Along the trail, you will enjoy views of an expansive grassy meadow with tall peaks rising in the background some 3,000-feet from the valley floor. Interpretive signs along the route describe landmarks, plants, and animals. It can be busy with cyclists, people walking dogs, and hikers. For the last 0.2 miles, you’ll share the road with vehicles. Alternatively, to reach the village you can avoid the road by rerouting thru the first Squaw Valley parking lot. There is a short steep hill by the Post Office (about 1.8 miles out) but for an easier route, you can move to the bike lane in the road for about 200 feet. ACCESSIBILITY: There are 4 designated accessible parking spaces that are van accessible in the paved parking lot at Squaw Valley Park on the east side of the trail off Squaw Valley Road. There are many designated accessible parking spaces that are van accessible in the paved parking lot at the Resort at Squaw Valley on the west side of the trail. The trail is paved (with a yellow dividing line which reduces the width) and with an estimated grade of mostly gentle. The typical width is four feet or greater. The trail may be slippery due to snow and ice in the winter. There are vault restrooms at Squaw Valley Park and public full-service restrooms at the Resort at Squaw Valley. There are firm & stable picnic tables (most at the Resort at Squaw Valley) with a path to tables, firm & stable surface, and 27" or greater knee clearance.Show more