Explore the most popular snowshoeing trails in Shasta-Trinity National Forest with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

Beautiful. Your walking through the campground on an asphalt trail for a good portion. Then you hit middle falls and your reminded why you go hiking. I was trying out a new loaded backpack and it was a good length to get my first idea of what the pack would feel like. Upper falls is a great place to just sit and feel the power of the river just before it plummets. Trail is wide and popular.

Great hike. Start at the lower falls and work your way up. Watch for lizards and squirrels. Middle falls is the most spectacular in my opinion - the water is still pretty cold, but you can go for a swim there.

Don't try to use the alltrails app to get directions to this trail. It took me to a completely different, sketchy area behind some peoples houses. There was a trail back there but it was not maintained very well. I still got a hike in but it was a lot more strenuous than I was planning.

This is a really nice hike. Since I like to do things the hard way, I hiked up instead of down. The location of this hike allows several options - today I parked near McBride Springs campground (where the trail crosses Everitt Memorial) and hiked an out-and-back on the upper section. (From the campground, follow the trail that says "water" to find the trail.) There are some patches of snow left, and really nice view of Mt. Shasta and the Eddies near the top. The trial is unsigned, but easy to follow. In a bigger snow year, there would be a lot more snow on the upper part of this trail, which might make it more difficult to follow.

hiking
1 month ago

Great hike. Did this two days ago with my dog after a snow storm the night before.

Beautiful and awe inspiring! The waterfalls were really flowing with all the melted snow. It also lightly snowed during our hike which created a storybook magical scene. The trail was pretty well kept as well so you could focus on the beauty around you. 10/10 would visit again

Snow has the road to Falls rather challenging to say the least. Lots of deep snow ... no clearance. hard ... need a 4x4 and good tires!

Easy hike with views to the northwest, southwest, south and east and the treat of a lake at the end. A regular for the Siskiyou Wanderers, often in winter or spring.

This is an easy hike, but beware, there are lots of unmarked spur trails that loop all around the area. Luckily, majestic Mt Shasta and the Eddys offer great visuals for keeping you headed in the right direction. My Labs and I are always happy to have another dog-friendly trail to choose from!

Summitted this majestic mtn several years ago and have ascended other 14-ers since. This is still my favorite AND one of the more challenging to safely climb!

Our ascent was on the Summer Solstice 6/21 with a Full Moon, bright starry night, clear blue skies, tandem moonset/sunrise and a heavy snowfall 3 days earlier... Couldn't ask for any better conditions than that! The icing on top was the exhilerating glissade ride down that cut several hours off our descent...

We rewarded ourselves the next day with soothing massages, mineral soaks & cold creek dips at Stewart Springs followed by a hearty dinner at Mt Sasta Resort to replenish the approx. 10,000 calories we'd burned!

Beautiful and easy hike! The Middle Falls were definitely the show stopper. Would recommend to anyone looking for an easy day with amazing views.

Made the trip down from Portland for a solo NYE summit. Unbelievable. Be extra cautious on the descent, especially through Red Banks.

hiking
4 months ago

Breathtaking hike and views. I was able to get above tree line with heavy duty yak-tracks. The ones with teeth, not just a cord. But I felt uneasy once it got steep without an ice axe to rescue me if I fell and made the slide for life.
Bottom line: It’s an absolute must do, if you’re in the area. The first part is fairly easy. Just make sure you have some sort of traction device. The snow was packed and therefore, icy. The crowds thinned to four of us once past the first 1/2mile...as is normal for wilderness hikes. And as an introvert looking for solitude, I’m thankful for that.

I did this hike first week of December with my dog. The drive up to the trailhead was almost as beautiful as the actual hike - beautiful views of the Weaverville and surrounding mountains the whole way up to the lookout tower. If you're looking for a beautiful drive (a little under 2 hour drive from Redding - AWD or 4WD recommended but not necessary) and an easy hike to a beautiful alpine lake, then this is it. Easy as far as short in distance, there is still incline both ways to consider. I happened to get caught in a snow storm during the hike, so visibility of the lake wasn't ideal. But the granite ridges, iced over lake and surrounding evergreens along the trail covered in snow was a beautiful scene. I can't wait to go back and hike this again once the snow clears.

Easy walk/hike with amazing views. Suitable to bring children, and or older relatives visiting. Clean restrooms on several locations along the trail. The trails are wide, and partly paved. It's sometimes crowded, especially during summer. I've done the hike many times. The waterfalls are magical. Not a very challenging hike.

The rock, seeing all three falls and the pretty McCloud river makes this a wonderful hike - enjoyed the beauty.

The rock, seeing all three falls and the pretty McCloud river make this a wonderful hike - enjoyed the beauty.

hiking
8 months ago

Middle Falls makes it worth the other shortcomings. Easy to find - parked in lower falls area. Nice falls but nothing to get excited. The hike has 2 downsides - first 1/2 miles is on asphalt and for well over half the hike you are working NEAR the river but cant see it so pretty boring. When you get to the Middle Falls really amazing. You then can go up to the rim and walk down to the upper falls which is ok. Walk back on a fairly boring hike ......but Middle falls is really special

hiking
8 months ago

Climbed Shasta in June of '17 as my first '14er. Started around 4:30 AM and reached the summit around 10:30 AM. I was in the middle of a cycling tour from Portland to SanFrancisco, so I was in solid shape at the time. From what I understand, most 1 day summit attempts should be started around 1 AM. 2017 was also a heavy snow year, so it was a bit easier in late June that it may have otherwise been. Beautiful views throughout the climb, and I can't wait to get back out to Shasta.

hiking
9 months ago

easy walk between the falls. start with the lower falls and make your way up! at the large middle falls you can swim in the cold water

hiking
9 months ago

climbed 2 weekends ago (07/15-07/16) along the west face route. started from bunny flats and camped at hidden valley Saturday (~3 mi and 2,000 ft elevation gain, took us approx. 6 hrs). started our climb up the west face ~1 am Sunday. we left most of our gear (tents, sleeping bags, snowshoes which we never used) back at basecamp and only brought crampons, ice picks, and helmets, along with food, water and extra jackets which also didn't need. reached the saddle point (top of west face) ~8 am and then reached the summit ~10 am. there was one other group climbing ahead of us, other than that didn't see anyone, was amazing. conditions were perfect, clear skies, low winds. glissade back to hidden valley (~4,000 ft in 30 min) around noon was incredible. then packed up our stuff and made our way back to the bunny flats trailhead. trail between hidden valley and horse camp is not very pleasant, hard to find and slippery talus/scree most of the way, but worthwhile.

Summited 7/14/18.

Ascent to Lake Helen the day previous. Certainly didnt hurt acclimatization. Late evening nap from 9PM till 3AM then the summit push. Took our time to Red Banks and then enjoyed the walk up Misery Hill to the Palisades.

To enjoy a quieter, safer and more rewarding summit I would advise avoiding weekends and holidays.

hiking
10 months ago

Fun time had by all. 9 hours of uphill snow and scree from horse camp to the summer, 3 hours of (mostly glissading) downhill. Would probably be quicker earlier in the season; snow was very soft once sun came up.

hiking
10 months ago

Beautiful but do not underestimate this mountain. Didn't reach the top this time due to a fallen soldier but will return

hiking
10 months ago

July 15 2017
Be prepared to drive on a windy dirt road for 30 minutes to reach the trailhead. You basically drive up the entire mountain and park at the top. I was not very smart and brought my little Hyundai up but couldn't make it all the way. It's a beautiful mountain top. There is a fire lookout to explore on the left and the trail is to the right. Slightly difficult to find trailhead since the sign has been torn down (see picture). Very brief and easy trail to the small "lake". Very narrow with some overgrown parts. The trail according to AllTrails takes you down to the lake but I could not find that section of trail and stayed at the top exploring. Not much to do up there without getting into dangerous situations. If you have four-wheel-drive and are looking for a Great view that you don't even have to hike for this is your trail. I wouldn't do it again simply because of the long dirt road.

Steep hike to the top. Very challenging but rewarding!

hiking
10 months ago

Chose to do as a straight shot, no camping. Started at 10 pm on 7/2/17 from Bunny Flat parking lot, temp at departure approx 75 degrees. Snow on trail after 1 mile. Moon was 3/4 and gave good overall light for direction finding once past Horse Camp. Snow past Horse Camp was soft, did not put on crampons until Helen Lake at 2am, probably should have put them on around 1am. Left Helen at 2:30 am with approx 40 other climbers, snow was hard, and uneven with suncups. Ascent to Red Banks took 3 hours, and while not terribly strenuous, a little dangerous because of people ahead slipping, dropping bottles, backpacks etc. witnessed one person fall and slide a hundred feet before he could self arrest. There is danger to oneself too, a slip can easiest result in sliding two thousand feet = death, or feedtube for rest of life. so, if this is your first time on mountain of this size, do yourself and others a big favor, and get educated on crampon, axe skills. Red Banks was a little challenging/technical, important that any climber can route find through them, not just follow others...who knows who they are, or what skills they have. many people were traversing lookers left, ascending rocky chutes, I chose to ascent first chute to left of headwall. At Misery, removed Crampons and went up scree switchbacks, put crampons back on to make final. rested at top for approx 2 hours with lunch. left summit at noon. made car by 3pm, after descending glissade luge below red banks. Ran out of water. Took 3 liters, gave one away for emergency. consumed 2 liters, and needed 4. I only knock of one star because not the most beautiful view from summit...

backpacking
10 months ago

I started on 6/18/17 at 6:30 am. I would recommend starting earlier to avoid the heat during climbing and to give more time for acclimation. Hike bunny flats and camped just below Helen lake. Since it was a Sunday there were lots of tents from the previous day but at about 5pm I was the sole tent on the mountain.

Conditions were very warm due to a heat wave. Too warm for my liking. Wind was real low at 10-15 MPH. Basically a perfect day.

Made camp, ate and went to bed around 8pm. Woke at 2am, made breakfast then started the climb at 3am. Reached Helen lake around 4am. That's where the steepest climb began. Slow and steady wins the race. Started with about 15 others ahead of me but ended up 4th to summit at around 7:45.

Going down was easy but take care not to relax too much. Most people get injured on the descent. Glissading was fun once the snow softened up.

Be sure to cover your head. I got sunburnt on my scalp from not wearing a hat all day at base camp. Also burned the corners of my eye balls so either use full wrap sunglasses or buy the leather side shields to protect from glare. Apply sunscreen every hour or so.

For elevation sickness I popped 600 mg of ibuprofen before I started hiking and every time I started to get a headache. Drink plenty of water and eat a good amount of carbs. Got a mild headache when I first reached base camp and when I started to descend from summit. Ibuprofen saved me! The headache is caused by inflammation in the brain.

I brought about a gallon of water and melted snow to get about a gallon more. Make sure you bring enough fuel and protect your stove from wind so you aren't wasting it when in use.

I'd do it again. Make sure you train though this is very intense physically.

backpacking
10 months ago

I started on 6/18/17 at 6:30 am. I would recommend starting earlier to avoid the heat during climbing and to give more time for acclimation. Hike bunny flats and camped just below Helen lake. Since it was a Sunday there were lots of tents from the previous day but at about 5pm I was the sole tent on the mountain.

Conditions were very warm due to a heat wave. Too warm for my liking. Wind was real low at 10-15 MPH. Basically a perfect day.

Made camp, ate and went to bed around 8pm. Woke at 2am, made breakfast then started the climb at 3am. Reached Helen lake around 4am. That's where the steepest climb began. Slow and steady wins the race. Started with about 15 others ahead of me but ended up 4th to summit at around 7:45.

Going down was easy but take care not to relax too much. Most people get injured on the descent. Glissading was fun once the snow softened up.

Be sure to cover your head. I got sunburnt on my scalp from not wearing a hat all day at base camp. Also burned the corners of my eye balls so either use full wrap sunglasses or buy the leather side shields to protect from glare. Apply sunscreen every hour or so.

For elevation sickness I popped 600 mg of ibuprofen before I started hiking and every time I started to get a headache. Drink plenty of water and eat a good amount of carbs. Got a mild headache when I first reached base camp and when I started to descend from summit. Ibuprofen saved me! The headache is caused by inflammation in the brain.

I brought about a gallon of water and melted snow to get about a gallon more. Make sure you bring enough fuel and protect your stove from wind so you aren't wasting it when in use.

I'd do it again. Make sure you train though this is very intense physically.

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