#13 of 60 national parks in United States of America

Best snowshoeing trails in Sequoia National Park

1,550 Reviews
Explore the most popular snowshoeing trails in Sequoia National Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of snowshoeing trails in Sequoia National Park
Park information
Acreage:
404,063 acres
Contact
559-565-3341
Helpful links
Top trails (6)
#1 - Congress Trail
Sequoia National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(512)
Length: 3 mi • Est. 1 h 33 m
This popular paved trail first takes you to the General Sherman Tree and then into the heart of the Giant Forest. No other trail in the park has so many large sequoia clusters in such a short distance. It is also a pleasant snow-shoe in the winter months. There are multiple steep sections on this trail with a grade above 12% making it not accessible for most wheelchair and strollers users. Also, there are some stairs when using this route from the north to access the General Sherman Tree. There is another way to get to General Sherman Tree from the handicapped-accessible parking lot to the south near Generals Highway and a portion of the Congress Trail can be done from there as a shorter loop. That trail can be found here: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/california/congress-loop-accessibleShow more
#2 - Alta Peak Trail
Sequoia National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(305)
Length: 14.9 mi • Est. 8 h 45 m
The Alta Peak Trail is a showcase of grand panoramic vistas, most dramatically in the last mile and a half before the peak. The rocky environment around the peak is strikingly beautiful, with sights that are unique to the alpine environment such as some fascinating alpine flowers and the rare Foxtail Pine (a long-lived relative of the Bristlecone Pine, the world’s oldest trees).Show more
#3 - Heather Lake via Watchtower Trail
Sequoia National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(229)
Length: 8.1 mi • Est. 4 h 41 m
A short section of the trail that lies past the Watchtower/Hump trail intersection is closed for the winter months annually due to icy conditions and steep cliffs. When it is closed you will need to use the Hump Trail to access Heather, Aster, Emerald, and Pear Lakes. (https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/california/heather-lake-via-hump-trail-winter-route)Show more
#4 - Crescent and Log Meadows Trail
Sequoia National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(170)
Length: 1.8 mi • Est. 52 m
#5 - Congress Loop (Accessible)
Sequoia National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(260)
Length: 0.9 mi • Est. 22 m
Accessibility: This trail begins at the same handicapped-accessible parking lot/shuttle stop that the accessible General Sherman Tree Mini Trail begins at, but it continues on a longer loop. This route is paved/boardwalk with an average grade of 5%. The moderate rating for this trail page is based on what the experience might be like for a wheelchair or stroller user, not a hiker. Some wheelchair or stroller users may be able to continue along the Congress Trail past this loop but caution is suggested due to there being several areas of grades above 12%.Show more
#6 - Middle Fork Kaweah Trail
Sequoia National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(13)
Length: 27.8 mi • Est. Multi-day
The first 3 miles to Panther Creek are fairly easy. This is the first place with campsites along the trail. Shortly after passing Panther Creek the trail increases in difficulty, climbing from roughly 4,000' to 4,800' in about 1.5 miles to Mehrten Creek. This creek has a few camp sites and is in tree cover with views of the valley below Castle Rocks and the Middle Fork River. Continuing on, the trail ascends and descends for the next 2 1/4 miles, crossing 3 unnamed drainages, with a campsite and fire ring in tree cover at the third drainage. After another 1/2 mile the trail ends at the 9.4 mile mark at a fork. This fork is not marked, but the left climbs up to Bearpaw Meadow and the High Sierra Trail while the right leads to Redwood Meadow. Heading right, the trail descends to an area with an obvious campsite in tree cover with a fire ring, log seats, and water access. There are multiple places to camp in this area. This trail follows the river for its duration but there is no river access until this point due to the steep banks. There are creeks along the way with flowing water and some of them collect in pools that would be nice to take a dip in during warmer months.Show more