#13 of 60 national parks in United States of America

Best horseback riding trails in Sequoia National Park

408 Reviews
Explore the most popular horseback riding trails in Sequoia National Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of horseback riding trails in Sequoia National Park
Park information
Acreage:
404,063 acres
Contact
559-565-3341
Helpful links
Top trails (6)
#1 - Heather Lake via Watchtower Trail
Sequoia National Park
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Length: 8.1 mi • Est. 4 h 41 m
A short section of the trail that lies past the Watchtower/Hump trail intersection is closed for the winter months annually due to icy conditions and steep cliffs. When it is closed you will need to use the Hump Trail to access Heather, Aster, Emerald, and Pear Lakes. (https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/california/heather-lake-via-hump-trail-winter-route)Show more
#2 - Twin Lakes Trail
Sequoia National Park
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Length: 13.1 mi • Est. 7 h 28 m
#3 - High Sierra Trail: Ninemile Creek to Bearpaw Meadow
Sequoia National Park
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Length: 20.5 mi • Est. 11 h 11 m
This is a nice hike, and would be a spectacular one if it were the only hike you were taking in Sequoia National Park. The great thing about this hike is that you get to see parts of three really superb trails: the Alta, Sevenmile and the High Sierra. The downside is that it is mostly uphill, and not the most spectacular of meadows, points of interest, destinations or views. What makes this trail stand out is the junction with the Alta Trail holds one of the best views that close to the road, as you sit just above the tallest of the Castle Rocks, and not too far below the Great Western Divide with it's peaks and crags. You could also begin this hike at Crescent Meadows and follow the high Sierra Trail to the connector to the Alta Trail. If you are camped at Bearpaw or Buck Creek, take a different hike. If you are just going out for the day, take the Alta Trail in as a loop through the Giant Forest to combine this into an amazing sampler of the sequoia and alpine parts of the park. Show more
#4 - Middle Fork Kaweah Trail
Sequoia National Park
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Length: 27.8 mi • Est. Multi-day
The first 3 miles to Panther Creek are fairly easy. This is the first place with campsites along the trail. Shortly after passing Panther Creek the trail increases in difficulty, climbing from roughly 4,000' to 4,800' in about 1.5 miles to Mehrten Creek. This creek has a few camp sites and is in tree cover with views of the valley below Castle Rocks and the Middle Fork River. Continuing on, the trail ascends and descends for the next 2 1/4 miles, crossing 3 unnamed drainages, with a campsite and fire ring in tree cover at the third drainage. After another 1/2 mile the trail ends at the 9.4 mile mark at a fork. This fork is not marked, but the left climbs up to Bearpaw Meadow and the High Sierra Trail while the right leads to Redwood Meadow. Heading right, the trail descends to an area with an obvious campsite in tree cover with a fire ring, log seats, and water access. There are multiple places to camp in this area. This trail follows the river for its duration but there is no river access until this point due to the steep banks. There are creeks along the way with flowing water and some of them collect in pools that would be nice to take a dip in during warmer months.Show more
#5 - Deadman Canyon Backpack Trip
Sequoia National Park
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Length: 48.8 mi • Est. Multi-day
This semi-loop backpack trip from Lodgepole to the Giant Forest delves through the backcountry of King Canyon and Sequoia National Parks, building by slow degrees to a grand climax of a High Sierra crossing at Elizabeth Pass, and winding down again with another gradual passage down the north wall of the Kaweah River. Glacier-carved cliffs and mountains, deep canyons, wildlife, and giant sequoias - this hike has it all. This hike includes more than 14,000 feet of elevation gained and lost overall. Elizabeth Pass may be covered with snow. Must obtain a wilderness permit for overnight use at the Lodgepole Wilderness Office; the park service charges a fee per wilderness permit obtained May 23 - Sep 27, but they are free outside that period. No fires above 10,000 feet in Kings Canyon National Park or above 9,000 feet in Sequoia National Park. There is a free shuttle from Crescent Meadow trailhead to the starting point.Show more
#6 - Crescent Meadow to Tamarack Lake
Sequoia National Park
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Length: 28.7 mi • Est. Multi-day
Hemmed within a glacier-scooped valley high in the west-facing wall of the Great Western Divide, Tamarack lake offers wild solitude and magnificent scenery to day hikers from Bearpaw Meadow. The trail is clear until the final mile, when you need to follow the large stone ducks to avoid confusion of stream beds. No fires allowed at the campsite.Show more