hiking

views

nature trips

walking

birding

wild flowers

dogs on leash

forest

dog friendly

trail running

wildlife

kid friendly

camping

river

mountain biking

fishing

off road driving

horseback riding

backpacking

waterfall

lake

Sequoia National Forest, in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains of California has the highest concentration of giant sequoia tree groves in the world with 38 groves within the park boundaries. Other species of trees include Jeffrey Pine, Red Fir, Coast Douglas-fir, Ponderosa Pine, White Fir, and Lodgepole Pine. In addition to the big trees, the park also features 850 miles (1,370 km) of trails, camping facilities, and beautiful wilderness areas. Sequoia NF is the official home of the Boole Tree, 12000 foot peaks, granite monoliths, and many limestone caves. Check out the trails listed or go to the Visitor Center for more info. Sequoia National Park, Sequoia National Forest, Kings Canyon National Park and Giant Sequoia National Monument are all next to one another in this area so it is a great place to make a trip out of.

My first hike after knee replacement surgery. This trail is paved and wheelchair friendly. The giant sequoia's are majestic and it is permitted to walk up and touch them. Unfortunately the Pine Bark Beetles killed the pines in the area and most of them had to be cut down as a precaution against a canopy fire. Federal National Monument regulations prevent the removal of the felled trees so the logs litter the area. Although this is unsightly the walk is still magnificent. There is a campground across the road and a parking lot for hikers. The lot is run by a state agency and well worth the $5 fee for its public toilets and nice picnic tables. This is an easy hike for children and seniors.

This trail is great for beginners to test their skills and see if hiking is meant for them. The trail is easy to complete but has everything you would see on moderate trails in a short package.

on Mill Creek Trail

20 hours ago

I'm a beginning hiker but my son told me the first couple miles of this trail would be easy. I'm so glad I went for it! I walked in a little less than 2 miles and loved every step of it before it got steeper and I decided to turn back. There were a couple of low stream crossings, beautiful views, and we got to see it coyote run across the trail close in front of us with a squirrel in his mouth. I can't wait to go back and challenge myself to go further uphill.

hiking
1 day ago

Had so much fun on this trail with my dog! Lots of creeks and gorgeous ferns and sequoias! My dog had fun splashing through the water while I tried to balance on the bridges. Very simple hike! Some spots where there isn’t shade it gets very hot! The trail head was a little confusing for us to find at first, but once we did the trail was easy to follow!

Easy, pretty and dog friendly, but it is sad/annoying to see all the people defacing the trees and roaming off trail. Still, the Giants are always breathtaking to see. :)

hiking
2 days ago

To find the trailhead, drive down the Needles Road for 3 miles until the road deadends at a campsite, parking lot and outhouse. We thought we were maybe going the wrong way, but yep, just keep driving til you can't drive no more. We made it in a Kia Sorento, but there were sudans there that seemed to have bad the trip just fine.

It took my 59 year old dad and my small terrier -mix 3 hours to finish the hike, and I think the terrier had the worst of it. Dogs are allowed on the trail, but I might not recommend bringing them, as my dog is still licking his paws four hours later.

The uphill parts were brutal in some places, but the absolutely worst part was the staircase at the end. I'm actually unsure if you're even supposed to go on the staircase - as many people have mentioned, the tower is closed (burnt down) and when you make it to the top of the staircase, the last few steps are missing! I carried my dog up the staircase, got nervous about the height and turned back. but the second set of stairs took my breath away (maybe it was the combo of the altitude, adding another 12 lbs to my weight by carrying the dog, and the stairs that did it). The view was beautiful (although terrifying)!

Saw a rattlesnake on the way back, so pay attention to your surroundings.

hiking
3 days ago

Amazing trail with awesome views. There was a nice breeze and a lot of shade. Make sure you make it to the top, it’s an easy two miles.

hiking
4 days ago

Like some said, not a lot of shade. We only crossed one creek (still no bridge but we climbed a log), but there were some washes that may have water after the snow melts. (went in early June).

Found what looked like trail that followed along the river, but it quickly became overgrown and impassable. Would have been a nicer trail if we were closer to the water.

The trail continues on and there's no clear marker for the end of the Bull Run trail portion.

Otherwise extremely pretty trail, definitely want to hike when its cooler.

The view at the top was amazing! Well worth the hike

It’s really relaxing and calm hike. I and a friend almost made it to the top. I highly recommend it.

Bring lots of water. Flashlight is a must. Walking back is way better than walking there!!

hiking
11 days ago

Haven't been there BUT:
Between the fact that it's right on a very cold river, to the lack of photo of the actual hot springs to a few people who say they couldn't find it - I don't think there's an actual hot anything to be found here...

hiking
13 days ago

I loved this trail. Lots of sequoias hidden throughout the trail which was beautiful. Hiking out was a challenge but definitely worth it. I did 10 miles in about 5 hours.

hiking
14 days ago

Loved this trail! Perfect hike for those looking for an easy pace and beautiful views!!

walking
14 days ago

Beautiful trail where you can take pictures during your walk.

nice trail, the walk back is killer so be prepared. Bring water....lots esp. in summer

hiking
16 days ago

Wowzers! This was extremely difficult for me... the elevation changes really made it even harder, but the constant inclines & declines were killer. Yes, the 1st part is the steepest but it never gets easier... just down to go back up to go back down several times. Absolutely no shade for over half the trail. The creeks were a nice reprieve - we took hand towels & soaked them in the water (likely the only thing that kept us out of medical danger). We had lots of water, but still not enough - we ran out half way back on the return... Don't forget that steep 1st incline is also an incredibly steep decline at the end... this was causing alot of pain on our toes & feet. The cave is definitely neat, but it's a long trek out. There is a geocache there too... If you think you have enough water, get more... double it!

Loved this trail. It was an easy trail and absolutely beautiful. Lots of giant sequoias to see.

hiking
18 days ago

We went on this trail during Memorial Day Weekend, and the plants were a bit of a bummer ( foxtails, yellow starthistle-like plants that kept getting caught in our hiking boots/pricking us through our pants). I’m not sure if the trail is more maintained during the rest of the year, but also the creek was dried out and we didn’t see any water. There were a few parts where the view was beautiful, but it’s a lot of effort to get there through the rough and dusty road.

backpacking
21 days ago

I proposed to have this trail added to AllTrails because it's a great alternative to the Norris trailhead in the early season that still ends at the Jackass Lakes. Not having done Norris, I can't compare the difficulty. Early season meant a little snow on the ground, but only in the shady areas. Not on the trail.
Getting there - it takes about an hour and a half to drive back Beasore Road after you turn off from Bass Lake. The road is unpaved at times, but I don't have 4WD and it was not an issue. But if rain is in your forecast, call the ranger for a road report. Make sure you either load the route into your Google Maps app before you lose service, or keep an eye on mileage so you know when to expect the parking lot. There is a large trail head sign for Jackass Trail head - you just start guessing the meaning of life that far back a dirt road and if you missed it some how.
The trail - the elevation climb is no joke. We did it in 2 hours with our packs on which sounds like cake to the experienced. When you start out, you're pretty pumped to be heading out, so you tend to not let it phase you. Just keep a trekking pole handy. We met a dad and daughter at the lakes, she was 10 and it was her first over nighter. So take that for what it's worth. Trail has a lot of shade, but some open hot spots as well if the sun is out. Since we went up so early in the season, some of the trail was hard to follow - look for stacked rocks to keep you on track. You shouldn't have much of an issue. Props to the USFS for going out there and clearing the trail - lots of fallen trees over the winter.
The lakes - lower Jackass Lake is great. I won't even try to explain the views, too incredible for words. There were 2 other campers up there, so 3 total sites set up along the lake and that was a good capacity. There is an upper Jackass Lake, we hiked to it the next day. You can see it on the map here. It was still frozen over but totally stunning. Again - views on views. Hike will make your glutes talk.

on Freeman Creek Trail

21 days ago

nice, quiet, breezy, running water sounds , a very nice hike, plenty of shade.

Beautiful

scenic driving
24 days ago

Beautifull Lake

Access roads to trail are open, beautiful walking path through the trees

hiking
25 days ago

Beautiful hot springs. Not to many people during the week.

camping
29 days ago

Moderately hiked (easy to moderate), lightly camped trail. Several sand embankment campsites - perfect for stone fire rings and level sand tent footprints. No need to hike water in, I wasted the effort as my Sawyer filtered river water was crisp and quenching. Seven Teacups is not accessible from the trail as crossing the Kern is necessary and is hazardous given high river flow. Recommend hiking past teacups (about 2 miles from bridge) to find less frequented campsites. No permits required, but if you are fishing you must use “no barb” hooks (bent down barb - increases fish survival) as this is a wild Golden Trout (California’s State Fish) area which is protected (limit 2 catches and not more than 10”) - catch and release is always best.

nature trips
30 days ago

Nice calm and relaxing walk

mountain biking
1 month ago

1st bit probably the most challenging. The cave experience was quite rewarding. I would say the trail is a must if you are in the area. Bring a flashlight and water.

hiking
1 month ago

Awesome easy hike.

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