hiking

views

walking

wild flowers

birding

nature trips

wildlife

forest

trail running

dogs on leash

dog friendly

mountain biking

kid friendly

camping

river

horseback riding

off road driving

backpacking

no dogs

waterfall

lake

snowshoeing

scenic driving

The wild lands of the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Mountain Ranges were designated a National Forest more than a hundred years ago. The Forest Reserve Act was passed in 1891, giving us the San Bernardino Forest Reserve, which became the San Bernardino National Forest in 1925. The San Bernardino National Forest as public land was set aside for the conservation of natural resources such as trees, water, minerals, livestock range, recreation, or wildlife. Today, the San Bernardino National Forest serves as southern California's outdoor year-around recreation destination, as well as providing valuable watershed protection. Drive the scenic Rim of the World Scenic Byway and Palms to Pines Scenic Byways to discover your local National Forest.

You no longer need a permit to day hike! adventure pass is still needed. Awesome hike but a bit windy with gusts up to 40 mph! 36 deg makes a facemask and gloves a nice thing to have.

hiking
2 days ago

hiking
2 days ago

We arrived on an in season Saturday late morning and there was plenty of parking in the lot. The first part of trail had a somewhat steep incline, but after that it was a winding incline to the cross. The trail had moderate hiking traffic with lots of friendly, but unleashed dogs. The trail is an up and back trail with beautiful views and ofcourse the Cross at the top! I would recommend and rate this as an easy to moderate trail due to the footing and incline. Happy hiking!

hiking
3 days ago

Easy little hike through a dried river bed, and then up a short trail to the fall.

off road driving
3 days ago

off road driving
4 days ago

hiking
5 days ago

A good incline to start and steady to the cross.

hiking
5 days ago

Awesome hike!!! Lot's to see, best time for this hike is in the spring after a good rain. Lots of creeks and waterfalls. Mid week is good time to go to avoid other hikers and a lot of people at the Hot Springs.

Our hike started in the San Antonio Heights, on Mountain Ave, went up the southwest ridge of Frankish Peak, and then down the "fire road" on the northern slopes of Frankish to the West Fork Trail and out to Skyline Dr. in Rancho.

Here's some info for anyone looking to poke around any of the areas we visited. The West Cucamonga Truck Trail is actually in pretty good shape. The section going through West Fork Cucamonga Creek is pretty precarious (if you don't like fairly narrow single track over 20+ foot drops, then give this trail a skip). The section between where Barrett Stoddard meets w/ the truck trail and Frankish Peak is completely overgrown. It's passable, but prepare for a thrashing and bring GPS because the brush is thick so it's hard to visually get your bearings. Overall, I'd strongly recommend shuttling from Barrett Stoddard road near Baldy to northern Rancho Cucamonga. Be careful where you park in Cucamonga, because they will ticket/tow! Good luck!

Also I almost forgot to mention, mountain bikers use this trail, and they go through very fast. Be alert for them!

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