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Best trails in Mount Tamalpais State Park, California

9,861 Reviews
Looking for a great trail in Mount Tamalpais State Park, California? AllTrails has 67 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 44 moderate trails in Mount Tamalpais State Park ranging from 0.6 to 61.1 miles and from 13 to 2,572 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Description

With its golden grasslands, iconic oak woodlands, stands of redwood forest, chaparral, and views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Mount Tamalpais State Park captures the heart of Marin County. While fog is a defining aspect of the ecosystem, on clearer days hikers can see the Farallon Islands, the San Francisco bay, the cities of the East Bay, and even as far as Mount Diablo. More than 50 miles of trail are within the park and connect to a larger, 200-mile-long trail system. Bicyclists are challenged by old railroad grade, or the twisting road to the highest point of the park's summit. Camping at Bootjack or Steep Ravine makes for a great overnight trip. The park is open from 7am to sunset year-round. Dogs are not allowed on trails, on fire roads or in undeveloped areas. Dogs are permitted on leash in the picnic areas and campgrounds, except in the Environmental Campground. Accessibility: The Visitor Center, Gravity Car Barn, and Mountain Theatre are accessible and have wheelchair-accessible restrooms and parking. Wheelchair accessible picnic sites and restrooms are available at the Bootjack and Pantoll Picnic Areas. There is one wheelchair-accessible campsite at the Steep Ravine Environmental Campground. At the Steep Ravine Cabins, the William Kent cabin is designated as wheelchair accessible with accessible beds, turning space, and table/counter. It also has accessible parking that will accommodate vans with two accessible restrooms by the parking area. There is one accessible campsite at the Alice Eastwood Grove Group Camp and the restroom there is wheelchair accessible. At Pantoll Campground, there is one wheelchair accessible campsite, an accessible restroom, and a drinking fountain. For additional accessible trails and facilities information in the park, please visit: http://access.parks.ca.gov/parkinfo.asp?park=82&type=0

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Map of trails in Mount Tamalpais State Park, California
Park information
Acreage:
6,300 acres
Park hours
Monday
7:00 am - dusk
Tuesday
7:00 am - dusk
Wednesday
7:00 am - dusk
Thursday
7:00 am - dusk
Friday
7:00 am - dusk
Saturday
7:00 am - dusk
Sunday
7:00 am - dusk
Contact
415-388-2070
Helpful links
Top trails (66)
#1 - Dipsea, Steep Ravine, and Matt Davis Loop
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(2299)
Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 3 h 39 m
Hike from the Pacific Ocean all the way up to The Muir Woods Visitor Center. This route offers a spectacular view of the ocean, rushing streams and beautiful waterfalls. Steep Ravine is a real jewel in Marin County's crown. Cutting deep into the landscape over millennia the water rushing through Webb Creek has created a spectacularly steep sided and lush canyon shaded by towering redwood trees and populated with a wide variety of local flora and fauna. The hike begins along the Dipsea Trail at Stinson Beach. It climbs gradually with many ocean views until you reach its' junction with the Steep Ravine Trail. From here it climbs 1000 ft. to Pantoll ranger station in 1.5 miles. There are two significant waterfalls along Webb Creek in Steep Ravine. The upper one is interesting because you have to climb up the waterfall via a 10 ft. high ladder. These waterfalls are best seen in the winter or early spring months, after there has been a lot of rain. Once at Pantoll, cross the highway and head back down to Stinson Beach via the Matt Davis trail. You will find more great ocean views on this trail. Many people like to do this hike in the reverse direction, going up Matt Davis trail and down Steep Ravine. But the Matt Davis trail is longer (4 miles) and it is all up hill if you go this way.Show more
#2 - Dipsea Steep Ravine Matt Davis Loop Trail from Pantoll
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1352)
Length: 7.4 mi • Est. 4 h 10 m
#3 - Dipsea Trail to Steep Ravine Trail Loop from Pantoll
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(694)
Length: 3.6 mi • Est. 2 h 5 m
$8 Parking Fee to park in the lot This hike includes great views of the Bay Area, Marin Headlands, the Golden Gate, Potato Patch, and down the San Mateo Coastline. As the walk progresses the trails will head into Redwood Forest, and drop - really drop - down into the heart of Steep Ravine. The trails become a series of stairs immediately adjacent to a seasonal creek. In some spots it's surely underwater during storms. Once in Steep Ravine it's all uphill back to the Ranger Station. The trail criss-crosses the creek repeatedly looking for space for itself, regularly climbs more steps, and a short ladder next to a waterfall in the quest to gain altitude. The reward is one of the best Redwood Canyons around.Show more
#4 - Dipsea Trail to Steep Ravine Trail Loop from Stinson
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(763)
Length: 6.1 mi • Est. 3 h 35 m
Hike overlooking the Pacific Ocean. This trail offers stunning views and chaparral and redwood habitats.Show more
#5 - Matt Davis Trail to Pan Toll Road
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(443)
Length: 6.5 mi • Est. 3 h 47 m
#6 - Stinson Beach to Mount Tamalpais via Matt Davis Trail
Mount Tamalpais State Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(206)
Length: 17.0 mi • Est. 9 h 21 m
#7 - Muir Woods via the Bootjack Trail
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(209)
Length: 7.1 mi • Est. 3 h 16 m
Every weekend during the summer months, signs on the main roads in Marin County start reading "Muir Woods Parking Lot Full," leaving those who crave a stroll among the wondrous Muir Woods redwoods two options: take a shuttle or try another day. But there is a third option -- Muir Woods National Monument is only two miles by trail from the Pantoll Ranger Station at neighboring Mount Tamalpais State Park. The out-and-back hike along the Bootjack Trail, plus a couple miles of wandering at the Monument, should yield about six miles of heaven under the big trees. There's about 800 feet of elevation loss/gain on a steep, challenging path down to the Monument, so it might be too much for beginners, but it's no big deal for experienced hikers. Vehicle registration: $8 cash or credit when ranger is working, cash only when station is unmanned. You pay at the ranger's office then stick the permit on your windshield.Show more
#8 - Mount Tamalpais East Peak
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(296)
Length: 0.6 mi • Est. 23 m
The Plank Walk is a rocky dirt trail that ends at Mount Tam East Peak Fire Look Out Station with great views of the Bay.Show more
#9 - Canopy, Dipsea and Sun Trail Loop
Mount Tamalpais State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(192)
Length: 5.0 mi • Est. 2 h 42 m
Backdoor entry to Muir Woods on an uncrowded trail where you can enjoy scenery (and a bar!) most visitors never see. The ancient California redwood trees of Muir Woods National Monument are one of several remaining groves up and down the coast that escaped the lumberjacks thanks to forward thinking preservationists. Located just North of San Francisco this is the ideal place for visitors from around the world to come and marvel at the giant redwoods (which in this park grow up to 250ft tall and 14 feet wide) but it also means the area frequently attracts large crowds, bus tours and overflowing parking lots. Our hillside loop trail offers a great way to visit Muir Woods National Monument and avoid many of the crowds, before returning along a scenic route over Mt. Tamalpais State Park that most visitors don't get to see. One additional benefit along this trail is the chance to spend a little time at the Tourist Club. In the past we've had little trouble as non-members enjoying a drink here, but here's what it says on the club's website: "The Tourist Club is a private facility for the use of its members, however the Tourist Club welcomes guests for our Festivals, held annually in May, July, and September, and occasional activities and events, which are posted on our calendar."Show more
#10 - Verna Dunshee Trail and Plank Trail at Mount Tam East Peak
Mount Tamalpais State Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(95)
Length: 1.2 mi • Est. 41 m
The Verna Dunshee Trail is the paved, outer loop featuring a viewing platform. The Plank Walk is a rocky dirt trail that ends at Mount Tam East Peak Fire Look Out Station. Both have beautiful views of the Bay area. Accessibility: The outer loop, the Verna Dunshee Trail, is less steep (although it still has some steep sections), paved, and considered the more wheelchair or stroller friendly route. It is typically at least four feet wide. The estimated grade is mostly gentle except for steep sections between 8% and 12% at about 0.3 and 0.7 miles from the parking area. Assistance may be needed there. There are wheelchair accessible parking, restrooms, drinking fountains, and picnic areas by the trailhead.Show more
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