Looking for a great trail in Los Padres National Forest, California? AllTrails has 170 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 80 moderate trails in Los Padres National Forest ranging from 0.6 to 37.3 miles and from 187 to 8,815 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!

views

hiking

wild flowers

nature trips

wildlife

bird watching

dogs on leash

forest

running

mountain biking

walking

dog friendly

camping

river

kid friendly

backpacking

ohv / off road driving

waterfall

horseback riding

no dogs

lake

rock climbing

partially paved

Los Padres National Forest is a beautiful place in central and Southern California. Administered by the United States Forest Service, Los Padres includes most of the mountainous land along the California coast from Ventura to Monterey, extending inland. Elevations range from sea level to 8,800 feet. Many threatened and endangered species live in this beautiful place. Probably the most famous among them is the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), for whom the United States Forest Service established the Sespe Condor Sanctuary. Hot springs, hiking trails, rivers, and desert views about in this recreation area. An Adventure Pass is required within many areas of the park. Wilderness areas in Los Padres include: San Rafael Wilderness (194,380 acres (787 km2)) Ventana Wilderness (240,026 acres (971 km2)) Garcia Wilderness (14,100 acres (57 km2) in the Lucia District) Santa Lucia Wilderness (20,412 acres (83 km2) in the Lucia District, in the Santa Lucia Mountains) Machesna Mountain Wilderness (19,880 acres (80 km2), in the La Panza Range in San Luis Obispo County) Silver Peak Wilderness (31,555 acres (128 km2), in the Monterey District) Dick Smith Wilderness (64,800 acres (262 km2) in the Santa Barbara Ranger District) Chumash Wilderness (38,150 acres (154 km2) in the Mt. Pinos Ranger District, just west of Mount Pinos) Sespe Wilderness (219,700 acres (889 km2), in both the Ojai and Mt. Pinos Ranger Districts) Matilija Wilderness (29,600 acres (120 km2) in the Ojai Ranger District)

This is a great trail with beautiful scenery. The trail travels along the creek, crossing over to one side and then the other as the terrain allows for walking. The first third or so of the trail offers ample shade, but later trees are more sparse and those that are there are badly damaged by a previous fire. Some parts of the trail are overgrown and you have to fight your way through the foliage a bit. The trail is wide enough for one person and is pretty uneven walking terrain, with many rocks and roots. A walking stick and some good hiking shoes are helpful here. We went in the middle of the day, when it was approaching 90 degrees, but the heat was tolerable. The intermittent encounters with water as you cross the creek are pleasant and refreshing.

hiking
rocky
1 day ago

hiking
no shade
rocky
scramble
1 day ago

The hike to the summit is steep and very slippery. Otherwise, great hike with great views. Not much shade. Don't hike it when it's hot.

A little longer than stated. Amazing view on top!

hiking
3 days ago

It is dry for the first mile or two but if you keep going you will reach pool 1 pool 2 pool 3. This app helped so much getting there.

hiking
4 days ago

Beautiful one of the best trails in the area.

hiking
5 days ago

Great forest hike in early September! Beautiful pine trees and much cooler than Bakersfield.

hiking
5 days ago

Really fun trail. Challenging but easy enough for a beginner. Leads into a bunch of other trails if you wish to be a little more adventurous

Sweet and hard hike. Ate our tacos at the top with Sasquatch.

hiking
rocky
scramble
6 days ago

Beautiful hike on a perfect day to the Punch Bowls in Santa Paula. Seven mile round trip, in and out. The last two miles to the pools was some pretty rough terrain, scrambling over boulders and trying to find the way marked by spray painted arrows that dotted the trail. I understand that the switchback trail that goes up and over the south face of the canyon and drops hikers right at the top is still there but its unmarked and if you follow the spray painted arrows, they will lead you up the creek to the lowest Punchbowls. Saw a couple lizards, snakes, and butterflies. One dead steelhead trout was floating around; none alive we could see in the water. Lots of people out on the trail. We shared the pool with three other groups. We reached the lower pool, 3.5 miles in and decided that was enough. The water was COLD but clean and clear; everyone swam. Our group of 6 stashed a gallon of drinking water in two spots an hour apart as we climbed so we didn't have to carry it all the way up and back down the hill and it was waiting for us as we returned.

Best hike ever ! Made it to punch bowl #3 so worth it ! I believe it’s about 6 miles in !! Bring snacks and lots of water ! We started the hike at 7:30 and finished around 3:30!! Water shoes are very much recommended!!

hiking
blowdown
bridge out
bugs
closed
muddy
no shade
off trail
over grown
rocky
scramble
washed out
7 days ago

Great trail! A little tough for the little kids with some rock hopping. Plenty of water to cool down with. Take dry socks and a towel!

hiking
bugs
no shade
over grown
7 days ago

Soooo faaaaaar. And first and foremost- it should be noted that YOU CAN'T SUMMIT THIS PEAK. The trail map is wrong. And there is a LOT of Poodle Dog bush. We got started at 5:30am and got back to the car at 7pm. Don’t forget to pay the $10 parking fee, as this area isn’t managed by the LPFS and the Adventure Pass won't work. The data on my recording stats are wrong, FYI. We ended up doing closer to 22-23 mi of hiking. Probably moving around 11:30hrs. With the help of the below comments, we found the trail quite easily across the creek. Even in the dark! Where we lost our way was in staying on the Lion Canyon trail. We saw the sign but stayed right where the trail was more defined and ended up at West Fork Camp. Nice camp! Lots of water. A good accident to have, because we ran out of water at the end and headed back there to collect. That is why we added 2 more miles to the hike. This part in the canyon required the most observation of the trail. When you get to the junction of West/East Fork Camps- look for the pink ribbons straight ahead. You need to bushwhack through and should get on the hillside to start ascending. All the elevation is done by traversing. Quite pretty. Once you get on the hillside, the trail is quite straight-forward. A little overgrown and lots of Poodle Dog, albeit totally avoidable with some care. Lots of bugs on the middle portion of the Red Reef Trail. You end up getting to the sign to indicate Lady Bug Camp and that is it. Hines Peak looms above and there is no way to ascend. And there is barely any shade to enjoy your lunch after you make it there.

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