hiking

views

walking

wild flowers

nature trips

birding

wildlife

trail running

dog friendly

forest

mountain biking

dogs on leash

kid friendly

camping

river

backpacking

off road driving

waterfall

horseback riding

no dogs

rock climbing

Los Padres National Forest is a United States national forest in southern and central California. Administered by the United States Forest Service, Los Padres includes most of the mountainous land along the California coast from Ventura to Monterey, extending inland. Elevations range from sea level to 8,800 feet. Many threatened and endangered species live within the forest. Probably the most famous among them is the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), for whom the United States Forest Service established the Sespe Condor Sanctuary.

hiking
21 hours ago

off road driving
1 day ago

Easy hike and beautiful views

Great hike, Was a great challenge to get to the summit peak but the view is breathtaking and amazing recommend to any one looking for a good challenge

Amazing hike, very Scenic lots of dead grass. Right now :( but the view is amazing though

hiking
10 days ago

Great hike. Make sure to bring enough water. I wish that I had worn gaiters, lots of brush that gets in your boots. Great wide open views

hiking
11 days ago

Always a great hike challenging because of distance and elevation gain but such a great trail

I'd definitely recommend this hike to anyone looking for something a little harder and more out there then something like bishops peak. Took me about an hour and a half to get to the top and an amazing 360 degree view on a clear day from Morro rock to Atascadero area. Trail is marked out well minus a few spots but using common sense you can figure out where you need to go. Make sure you bring 10$ to pay the day fee or 25$ for camping. Ticks, rattlesnakes and mountain lion warnings posted but that's normal for hiking in my opinion.

Some parts more of a scramble than a hike I went on a Monday at the beginning of October and didn't see another person the entire day. It is more like a backpacking trail in many parts, in the respect that you have to follow kierns or very light tracks rather than a delineated trail

Backpacked the Lion Canyon Trail (which ends at a road weirdly enough) and explored the East Fork and West Fork camps. We camped at the West Fork, but some of the camping spots are over grown with thorny vines and fallen trees. Both water falls at the forks were dry, but we are excited to return after rain. West Fork had a bit of water, thus our reason for staying, but East Fork is the more stunning and spacious ground. Beautiful Canyon! Parts of the trails are slightly over grown, but didn't require any crazy bush whacking. LOTS OF POISON OAK! However, the wildlife was amazing! Owls, lizards, skunks, hawks, spiders, etc. There is also a connector trail to the Rose Valley Falls, which we understand to be spring fed, so that is worth checking out as well. We were almost completely alone for 48 hours, until three day hikers came to explore the East Fork Falls. We had the whole canyon to ourselves essentially! If you don't mind a few thorns in your socks, this place is definitely recommended,