#74 of 90 state parks in California

Best bird watching trails in Limekiln State Park, California

316 Reviews
Explore the most popular bird watching trails in Limekiln State Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of bird watching trails in Limekiln State Park, California
Park information
Acreage:
711 acres
Park hours
Monday
8:00 am - dusk
Tuesday
8:00 am - dusk
Wednesday
8:00 am - dusk
Thursday
8:00 am - dusk
Friday
8:00 am - dusk
Saturday
8:00 am - dusk
Sunday
8:00 am - dusk
Contact
805-434-1996
Helpful links
Top trails (5)
#1 - Limekiln Creek Falls Trail [CLOSED]
Limekiln State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(230)
Length: 1.4 mi • Est. 47 m
This is a very scenic short trail system suitable for anyone who is reasonably fit. The trail requires scrambling over and under logs in a few places and crosses a steam multiple times with makeshift log and stone crossing points. During the summer it is fairly easy to do this hike without getting your feet wet. The trail is through second growth redwood forest and is shaded and very cool the entire time. The waterfall is worth seeing, and the abandoned lime kiln is cool. Trailhead is at the far end of camping area, walk past everyone, there are a small number of day use parking spaces for $10 fee. If it’s full there is parking on side of road above. At the opposite end of camping area there is a small sand beach and rocky area where the creek empties into the ocean. Cross a wooden bridge and walk under the bridge. That is also super cool and worth a visit. The water is freezing but nice to splash around. Bring a bathing suit and water shoes.Show more
#2 - Hare Creek and Limekiln Trails [CLOSED]
Limekiln State Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(40)
Length: 2.2 mi • Est. 1 h 16 m
Limekiln State Park is a 716-acre park along Highway 1, just south of the small settlement of Lucia in the Big Sur region. The park features a two-unit campground with a group of sites in the redwood forest and a second group of sites closer to the beach. There are also a few picnic tables for day use. There is no visitor center within the park, but interpretive information is available 26 miles north on Highway 1 at Big Sur Station. Limekiln State Park's main attraction is its short network of trails that head inland through a mixed forest of oaks and second-growth redwoods. The main trail splits into three separate trails: (1) the Hare Creek Trail, which ascends the narrow canyon of Hare Creek, (2) the Limekiln Falls Trail, which leads to 100' Limekiln Falls, and (3) the Limekiln Trail, which visits the old 19th Century lime kilns for which the park is named. Start your hike from the small day-use parking area just past the park's entrance kiosk. The route starts next to the restrooms adjacent to the parking lot, following the access road for the park's upper campground sites. At the far end of the campground, a narrow trail continues on a wooden bridge over Hare Creek and then quickly reaches a T-junction. Here, the Hare Creek Trail branches off to the right, while the Limekiln Trail turns left. Turn right to follow the Hare Creek Trail up along Hare Creek. The trail stays very close to Hare Creek and passes through several small redwood groves before dead-ending at a burned and downed redwood in the Hare Creek Grove. Although it lacks the large waterfall and historical ruins of the other two trails, the Hare Creek Trail is perhaps the prettiest trail in the park. The trail passes through numerous small redwood groves and usually stays close to the banks of picturesque Hare Creek. From the end of the Hare Creek Trail, return back down to the T-junction, where you'll turn right onto the Limekiln Trail. Now running along the left bank of West Fork Limekiln Creek, this trail shortly reaches a junction with the Limekiln Falls Trail. A right turn here leads to an easy step-across crossing of East Fork Limekiln Creek, then a brief climb via a switchback before reaching the trail's end at the base of Limekiln Falls. This 100' waterfall drops vertically over an exposed limestone face and offers views up into the park's rugged interior. A steep, slippery use trail on the left side of the falls leads to a closer view of the pool at the base of the falls. Use extreme caution if you decide to venture up this unofficial trail. After exploring the falls, backtrack again down to the junction with the Limekiln Trail, turning right to continue up along West Fork Limekiln Creek. The trail crosses another bridge, then continues up to its end at the site of the lime kilns themselves. Here, four rusted lime kilns still stand, surrounded by second-growth redwood forest. The kilns date back to the 1880s, when this site was used to process limestone quarried from the surrounding hillsides. The Limekiln Trail itself follows the route of an old wagon road that connected the kilns to the beach at Rockland Landing, where the processed lime was shipped to San Francisco to be used in making concrete. From the kilns, return back down the Limekiln Trail to the parking lot. After your hike, be sure to walk down the paved road through the park's Ocean Campsites to visit the small pocket beach at Rockland Landing. Hare Creek empties into the ocean here, and if it isn't too foggy, you'll have an excellent view of the Highway 1 bridge and distant Cone Peak on the horizon.Show more
#3 - Twin Peak and Cone Peak from Limekiln Campground [CLOSED]
Limekiln State Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(18)
Length: 17.8 mi • Est. 11 h 27 m
#4 - Twin Peak and Cone Peak Loop [CLOSED]
Limekiln State Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(13)
Length: 17.3 mi • Est. 10 h 57 m
This is a gnarly cross-country route and should not be attempted by the general public. Novices routinely get in trouble out there, requiring search & rescue, spending unplanned nights outside and getting into a dangerous situation or at the very least making a huge mess volunteers have to clean up. Do not hike here unless you are prepared, familiar with the territory, and are very well prepared.Show more
#5 - Twin Peak [CLOSED]
Limekiln State Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(15)
Length: 8.7 mi • Est. 6 h 40 m
This is a gnarly cross-country route and should not be attempted by the general public. Novices routinely get in trouble out there, requiring search & rescue, spending unplanned nights outside and getting into a dangerous situation or at the very least making a huge mess volunteers have to clean up. Do not hike here unless you are prepared, familiar with the territory, and are very well prepared.Show more