Looking for a great trail in Henry W. Coe State Park, California? AllTrails has 49 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 30 moderate trails in Henry W. Coe State Park ranging from 2.7 to 30.8 miles and from 853 to 3,195 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!

hiking

views

nature trips

bird watching

wild flowers

no dogs

wildlife

walking

forest

trail running

backpacking

camping

mountain biking

lake

horseback riding

river

Barely an hour’s drive southeast of San Jose, Henry W. Coe State Park – the largest state park in northern California - protects and preserves 87,000 acres of scenic hills and mountain ridges. This wild, largely undeveloped park welcomes backpackers, equestrians, mountain bikers, day-hikers, and anyone seeking solitude in a nearly untouched setting. Part of the Diablo Range, the park is an amalgam of high ridges, plateaus, and both narrow and open valleys. Henry W. Coe State Park sprawls over acres of high ridges and low valleys southeast of San Jose. It once belonged to a rancher named Henry Willard Coe; his heirs donated the ranch that would become the state park bearing his name. The park has few amenities, but has abundant trails for hikers, equestrians and mountain bikers. After a rainy winter, wildflowers bloom in profusion from February through March; by April the color is rampant. The landscape is rich with blue lupine and orange-yellow California poppies, bright yellow gold fields and delicate baby blue eyes. Mariposa lilies, larkspur, blue dicks and Ithuriel’s spear show themselves in late April and May. The variety and richness of the flora attract visitors from miles around. The park is open year-round for hikers, mountain bikers, backpackers, equestrians, car campers, picnickers, photographers, and people who simply like to visit parks. Hot, dry summers bring highs above 90, cooling to the 50s at night. Hikers should carry and drink plenty of water, even on less-strenuous trails. Winter is wet, with highs in the 50s and lows in the 30s. In winter, seasonal creeks can overflow and become dangerously impassable. Spring and fall are the most temperate and enjoyable times to visit. Prepare for the variable climate and rugged landscape by dressing in layers. Dogs are allowed in the main campground, paved roads and one trail that connects the Visitor Center to the parking lot off of E. Dunne Ave. Dogs are not allowed at the Hunting Hollow or Dowdy Ranch entrances or on any other trails within the park.

hiking
bugs
no shade
over grown
22 days ago

We did this hike in June. There was plenty of water available along the way. We started off from Coe HQ and went down to China Hole. We then followed the creek east about a mile to meet up with the Willow Ridge trail. The water level was pretty high due to the rains this year and we had to cross the creek 7 or 8 times in just a mile. Once you get to the willow ridge trail it is pretty much straight on a single track trail with lots of poison oak to watch out for. There was plenty of water from the spring in a trough about .3 miles from the Willow ridge campsites. We started the day at 1 pm and ended up getting to Willow Ridge about 8 pm. Willow Ridge was beautiful and had great views of the rolling hills as well as some cover under the trees. Everything up to this point was what I’d rate 5 stars. Nice scenery, good water availability, relatively shaded and a challenging hike. The second day we started off to Mississippi lake around 10 AM. After about 2 miles on the Willow Ridge trail you meet up with the fire road that will haunt you for the next 5-6 miles. There’s absolutely no shade, and the fire road follows the crests of the hills constantly going up and down in elevation. It was around 90 degrees that day and it was absolutely brutal being that exposed. Once you finally reach the lake and there’s a fork in the road where it loops around the lake you want to go RIGHT. There is an outhouse (No TP!) and a clearing in the reeds just down the hill from the outhouse where you can filter water. Be warned that although this is a lake the water tastes like it’s from a scummy pond. We camped about 200 feet past the outhouse on the other side of the dirt dam. We did the return hike ~13 miles the next day. It was even hotter at 95 degrees and we found ourselves cursing the completely exposed fire roads. All in all I gave this 3 stars because the fire roads make it extremely difficult and potentially dangerous to do in hot weather. If you’re planning on doing this hike in the summer time be prepared with heat umbrellas or protective clothing and be aware of the signs of heat stroke. In cooler weather I’d give this 5 stars. Make sure you bring a tick key and bug spray as there are ticks all over in Henry Coe.

hiking
no shade
1 month ago

Pretty good hike. No sight of tics. Did it clockwise - two intense uphill parts but the rest isn't too bad. Take water and sun hats/sunglasses.

hiking
no shade
off trail
over grown
1 month ago

Doesn't necessarily require 3 days and 2 nights It can easily be done in 2 days 1 night if you are fit and have a light pack.. Although it would be best in early season. I did it Fourth Of July weekend and it was pretty hot and water quality was low. Also trails can be hard to follow at North east of the park due to low foot traffic that side of the park gets.. But still amazing as always. Love Coe.

hiking
1 month ago

Anyone up for beating my time? Would love to see someone put up a faster loop. Great workout, but not particularly impressive otherwise (except for the steep grades)

hiking
blowdown
off trail
rocky
scramble
1 month ago

backpacking
2 months ago

I had a terrible time. I thought it was a great hike don't get me wrong but about 2 hours in, the tics came out to play. I tried to push through it but I came to an end point. I found at least 40 tics on me and at about 5 miles in, I decided enough is enough and I turned around. The hike I like but the tics totally ruined it for me. Don't go over the summer..

hiking
2 months ago

Pretty good workout- we started late this time- around 6:30 and finished around 4:00 pm. It got insanely hot. Creeks have water and we could filter and refill. We were each carrying 3 litres and we ran out. So please refill. Did it counter clockwise this time- the last mile is easier this way. But overall no matter which direction you take , it is brutal.

hiking
2 months ago

This trail will turn your ass into steel. Really beautiful, lots of water and wildflowers in mid-june.

hiking
2 months ago

Hard core. Beautiful wildflowers and a couple good creeks to swim in

hiking
2 months ago

There were so many mosquitoes on the trail. This trails are very steep like hell.

hiking
2 months ago

This trail is fun, easy, and rewarding! Beautiful views out over the Valley. A table for a picnic. Wear long pants, as it can be somewhat overgrown.

hiking
2 months ago

Hiked this June 1st. Warm day to start but ended hike in thunderstorm. Be prepared. Took 3 liters of water which was plenty. Hiked down China Hole Trail and out on Madrone Springs which switches back and forth along the stream and then a quick 1,000 foot climb. Need to be in good shape but the wildflowers, China Hole, and beauty in spring worth the effort.

backpacking
bugs
2 months ago

Take the Monument Trail from HQ to the first fork. I highly recommend taking the advice on the Coe State Park’s website doing the Frog Lake loop clockwise, starting on Hobbs Road and ending on Flat Frog Trail. Even though it’s mostly downhill, Hobbs Road can be punishing. An alternate route would take Corral Trail to Flat Frog, bypassing Hobbs Road altogether but skipping over the Coe Monument and the optional short-and-sweet Ponderosa Trail. Frog Lake was small, more of a pond, with lots of wildlife. There’s one site near the lake. Half a mile up from the pond is a spring and some campsites. I continued to Deer Horn and also checked out the beautiful campsite along Manzanita Trail (Ridge View Camp) to make this a 10 mile loop. Parking is $8. Backpacking sites are $5, and BE SURE TO CHECK IN AT THE RANGER STATION BEFORE HEADING OUT! They can tell you about backpack campsite availability. If you want to keep your pack light, camping at HQ is $20 for a tent site. If you camp at HQ you get a reserved parking spot and there is a designated lot for backpackers. If you’re day hiking, get in early to avoid waiting for a parking spot!

hiking
no shade
2 months ago

This was a great last minute trip as the permits are first come first serve! Although it didn’t matter too much because clearly there were lots of people without permits. Really beautiful this time of year. We arrived to thick warm fog as we entered the oak meadows after taking the entrance of the coe headquarters trailhead. Really steep ascents and descents on some parts of the trail, challenging but easy enough for inexperienced backpackers if you give yourself 2 or 3 nights. We did 3 nights and we all felt that we could have hiked a little more each day, although our final distance clocked in at around 28 miles. We had really sporadic weather when we were out there, fog, rain, sun, clouds, wind. Nothing we couldn’t handle but apparently the weather is notoriously unpredictable in the park. The creek was full enough to swim in some areas and shallow enough to tread through without getting your feet wet. Although you might do better strapping on your sandals in some places, because several of us got our feet wet. We accidentally went on memorial day weekend (oops lol) and camped by the creek the first night which was really nice. Second night we were supposed to camp at coit lake but the only available campsite was small for 5 people, so we went on to kelly lake where we found a ridiculous amount of people scrambling for a site. My guess is lots of people didn’t have permits, apparently some people were also making fires which is not permitted in the park. We took it in stride and camped in a pretty exposed area. Next day we were supposed to stay at lost creek but someone had claimed the only campsite there (kind of crappy of them considering we had a permit and all). I’m glad though because in the end we found a much better creekside camping spot by china hole. Overall it was really fun, for me the river and the beautiful flowers and meadows were the highlights. The lakes were a disappointment, as they are more for fishing. We loved camping by the river though! Overall beautiful california trail, docked one star because of the no campfires rule.

Actual route hiked was Jim Donnelly-steer ridge-serpentine trail-grizzly gulch-tule pond trail-wasno road-Kelly lake trail. Return via much shorter drexler trail to coyote creek TH. The landscape and scenery is beautiful and stunning and still quite a few wildflowers in bloom. Only giving 3 stars for two reason: 1 is that the trails are unnecessarily steep and many seem to be converted dirt roads it fire breaks. Even much of the singletrack simply goes straight up and down without even a thought of using switchbacks. 2nd is that being memorial weekend and having no quota system, Kelly lake and coit lake are overwhelmed with backpackers with way too few sites for the volume. We arrived a day early and was the only ones there so I would recommend to the park service to have quotas on holiday weekends to reduce the impact and to preserve the outdoor nature at the lakes. Did a day hike to Pacheco falls and defy worth the trip to see them.

hiking
2 months ago

A lovely, quiet trail with beautiful wildflowers and an over abundance of wildlife.

hiking
2 months ago

Trails on this 15 mile are in good shape. Enjoyed the wildflowers, butterflies, and acorn woodpeckers. Even the poison oak was prolific :-( Two water crossings; both can be rock hopped if you look for a few minutes. If you had to wade, it would be below the knee. Hike this on a cloudy or cooler day. Lots of exposure and no potable water. You could filter/treat water from the streams. Bathrooms located in the campgrounds. Read the waypoints on the recordings; some are helpful.

We stayed off the main road as much as possible from Headquarters to Los Cruzeros. The hike down is easy and the hardest part was running into little snakes crossing shin high water in through the Narrows. We stopped for lunch at China Hole and we had the place to ourselves. We stayed for only 1 night, since it was our first time backpacking, and left around 11:30AM. We took poverty flats back to Headquarters and it was pretty tough with 25lbs on your back. From the campsite to Poverty flat is a steep half mile and we took about 7-10 breaks on the way up(roughly every 250ft). Dont forget to filter water before you head home. We had so much fun and we can't wait to backpack more!

hiking
rocky
3 months ago

Definitely prepared enough water for the trail. The trails are really small which make it unique and fun. Be careful with all the small plants have spines that can hurt you, My ankle got scratched from those plants were really low on the ground.

mountain biking
muddy
3 months ago

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