Best trails in Coyote Point County Rec Area, California

68 Reviews
Explore the most popular trails in Coyote Point County Rec Area with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
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Map of trails in Coyote Point County Rec Area, California
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Top trails (2)
#1 - Coyote Point Marina Trail
Coyote Point County Rec Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(44)
Length: 0.4 mi • Est. 10 m
According to Access Northern California (http://accessnca.org/access-northern-california/explore/explore-detail-view/?site_id=156): This short loop hike on a breakwater by the marina takes you out onto San Francisco Bay and is very wheelchair-friendly. This trail has the park's best views of San Francisco and other cities in the distance. You can also catch sight of passing boats, windsurfers, and waterfowl. Coyote Point was once an island separated from the mainland by a large salt marsh that was later filled in. Much of the 670-acre park is flat, except for a few knolls among eucalyptus trees that often reveal scenic overlooks of the marina, the remaining marsh, and the Bay. With an outstanding nature museum, several playgrounds, plentiful picnic areas, a beach, large lawns, and an accessible playground at the Eucalyptus Recreation Area, the park makes a great day-long outing for families. Adults can also enjoy a shooting range, marina, yacht club (not wheelchair accessible), and fishing jetty. Situated on the east side of a tree-shaded knoll in the eastern part of the park, the CuriOdyssey Museum is a top-notch interactive science and education center that allows visitors to observe a variety of native California animals up close. Indoor exhibits include interactive displays, computer activities, videos, and films about Bay Area ecosystems. The open floor plan makes it easy to maneuver. In the outdoor animal habitats you can learn about and get close to various reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and, in the walk-through aviary, nearly two dozen native birds. The butterfly and hummingbird gardens are scenic and peaceful spots in which to rest and watch the wildlife. Accessibility: There is firm, designated handicapped-accessible parking with a slope no greater than 2% at the marina, trailheads, promenade, museum, and playground. The trail surface is paved, smooth, and it is typically at least six feet wide. It is mostly gentle, all 5% or less estimated grade. There are benches and fishing spots along the way, but fishing from a wheelchair requires casting over the riprap. The restrooms in the park are partially accessible (most only allow front-transfers, are too shallow to close the stall door, and have no grab bars on the back wall). The most accessible one is by the drop-in picnic area below the museum, which has enough clearance for closing the stall door and pulling alongside the toilet. Numerous picnic areas have accessible tables with a firm and stable path and surface, and at least 27 inches of knee clearance. The most accessible tables are downhill from the CuriOdessey Museum.Show more
#2 - Coyote Point Shoreline Trail
Coyote Point County Rec Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(15)
Length: 1.1 mi • Est. 27 m
According to Access Northern California (http://accessnca.org/access-northern-california/explore/explore-detail-view/?site_id=156): The shoreline trail is a good spot for birdwatching and for identifying planes on their approach to San Francisco International Airport. This trail follows one side of the harbor, then curves around to the Bay. A variety of birds can be seen in the surrounding wetlands, so bring binoculars. Coyote Point was once an island separated from the mainland by a large salt marsh that was later filled in. Much of the 670-acre park is flat, except for a few knolls among eucalyptus trees that often reveal scenic overlooks of the marina, the remaining marsh, and the Bay. With an outstanding nature museum, several playgrounds, plentiful picnic areas, a beach, large lawns, and an accessible playground at the Eucalyptus Recreation Area, the park makes a great day-long outing for families. Adults can also enjoy a shooting range, marina, yacht club (not wheelchair accessible), and fishing jetty. Situated on the east side of a tree-shaded knoll in the eastern part of the park, the CuriOdyssey Museum is a top-notch interactive science and education center that allows visitors to observe a variety of native California animals up close. Indoor exhibits include interactive displays, computer activities, videos, and films about Bay Area ecosystems. The open floor plan makes it easy to maneuver. In the outdoor animal habitats you can learn about and get close to various reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and, in the walk-through aviary, nearly two dozen native birds. The butterfly and hummingbird gardens are scenic and peaceful spots in which to rest and watch the wildlife. Accessibility: There is firm, designated handicapped-accessible parking with a cross-slope no greater than 2% at the marina, trailheads, promenade, museum, and playground. The trail surface is paved and it is typically at least six feet wide. It is flat, all estimated to be 1% or less in grade. Most wheelchair and stroller users will find this trail navigable. The restrooms in the park are partially accessible (most only allow front-transfers, are too shallow to close the stall door, and have no grab bars on the back wall). The most accessible one is by the drop-in picnic area below the museum, which has enough clearance for closing the stall door and pulling alongside the toilet. Numerous picnic areas have accessible tables with a firm and stable path and surface, and at least 27 inches of knee clearance. The most accessible tables are downhill from the CuriOdessey Museum.Show more