Brannan Island State Recreation Area is a maze of waterways through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The park, located northeast of the San Francisco Bay, has countless islands and marshes with many wildlife habitats and many opportunities for recreation, including boating, windsurfing and swimming. Much of the Island, located on the east bank of the Sacramento River, consists of sandy peat, with gently rolling hills covered in grass, brush and trees. Willows, oaks, alders, pines and cottonwoods are among the trees planted here, and much of the lower growth consists of wildflowers such as the California poppy, bush lupin, tree tobacco, the rare Antioch primrose, sweet fennel, milk thistle and tumbleweed. Local wildlife includes jackrabbits, ground squirrels, skunks and snakes, with a wide variety of birds including blackbirds, meadowlarks, mockingbirds, pheasants, flickers, sparrows, doves and the burrowing owl. One of the outstanding water-oriented recreation areas in the world, the area offers great fishing, including striped bass, sturgeon, catfish, bluegill, perch and bullhead. Franks Tract, a protected wetland marsh, is home to beaver, muskrat, river otter, mink and 76 species of birds. The park is on Highway 160 a few miles south of the city of Rio Vista in Sacramento County. The park is located on the lower peninsular extension of Brannan Island, and is surrounded by the Sacramento River on the west, Three Mile Slough on the southeast, and Seven Mile Slough on the northeast. The climate in the Delta is mild, with winter temperatures usually ranging between 45 and 55 degrees and summer temperatures between 75 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit. An occasional heat wave will push the temperatures in summer to 100 degrees or more but the Delta breeze is never far away.

This is a good place to go fishing, swimming, camping and enjoy the delta. This trail has plenty of uses and it does go through a campground that has nice big campsites. A lot of us take for granted the fact that we can hike a "real" trail but the fact of matter is that there are some other less fortunate individuals in this world that due to mobility issues can not enjoy the same trails as us. We should still give respect to those places we will still be able to access even if we find ourselves in a wheelchair someday.

This is not a trail rather a path through a campsite. The only worth while feature was a path down to a secluded little area along the river. We will not be back. #notahike

hiking
Thursday, January 08, 2015