Havasupai means people of the blue-green waters. The spectacular waterfalls and isolated community within the Havasupai Indian Reservation attract thousands of visitors each year. The Havasupai are intimately connected to the water and the land. This blue- green water is sacred to the Havasupai. It flows not only across the land, but also through each tribal member. When you enter their land, you enter their home, their place of origin.

Long hike but well worth it! Make sure you have permits, the village does not permit day hikes.

One of the best I've been to.

The best hiking, backpacking trip ever. Would recommend this 100% for those looking for a little piece of heaven.

best trip so far. long. pack lite as possible. trip back is a pain, especially the switchbacks. don't leave your pack out with food hang it up. squirrels. good socks.

If you are a lover of animals, BEWARE! You’ll want to remove this from your bucket list if you have any sensitivities to witnessing animal neglect. I wish I had read these reviews instead of listening to word of mouth on how great it was. If I had really known about the conditions of the animals I honestly never would have gone. I felt I was actually in a third world country based on the conditions of the animals in the town of Havasu, the hill top, and even close to camp. Within the first 15 minutes of my hike in I witnessed a horse carrying who knows how much weight in coolers almost fall to its death slipping on a switchback corner then almost getting its neck broken because it was part of a roped group and the horses didn’t stop right away; random hikers were the ones who helped lift/push it to be rescued because the carrier person didn’t want to free it of its gear to be freed of the neck wrapped rope and the impending cliff edge, I saw many starving horses, starving dogs and some animals sick with diarrhea because they weren’t getting proper nutrition and vet care, and horses standing in extreme heat with bleeding open sores. I’ve uploaded pics I could take of horses without breaking tribal respect for no pictures. Being on tribal land and not having adequate cell service to report concerns until by then it could no longer be “tracked/found” was crushing. Please read all the reviews and follow the advice of others in that if you do decide to go DO NOT use a hiking guide company that contracts with the pack mules - force them to use the helicopter, do not use the pack mules yourself, and do not uses horses as a way out. Support the tribe’s needs in other ways... with funding for food, education, etc and alternative options for supporting the tourism that helps them support their own families. Do right by the animals by not further funding this type of demand. Although it was pretty it wasn’t worth all the pain and suffering I saw around me. Also a sewer line broke up in town and was contaminating the water so enjoying the water was off limits the entire time we were there. All I really could and wanted to do the entire time was think of a good solution that would help end the cruelty yet work for the poor families, but I realized as long as people pay to use the pack animals, and there’s no federal intervention, this will continue. This wasn’t what I expected from what others raved about (some people choosing to ignore the problem?) and let’s just say I definitely didn’t get home feeling serene or relaxed from my “vacation” as expected. Go to Zion’s instead. Hike Angels landing, the narrows, or hike the Grand Canyon. Many other bucket list hikes with a good sense of challenge to chose from if you don’t have the stomach for this and aren’t ready to backpack in and out yourselves, or research a company that doesn’t perpetuate the mistreatment (I don’t know if one). Get it in writing though. I’ve seen companies say they were boycotting for change which made it to press, but they are back to using the mules. Do the research if you decide to use a guided service!

If you are a lover of animals, BEWARE! You’ll want to remove this from your bucket list if you have any sensitivities to witnessing animal neglect. I wish I had read these reviews instead of listening to word of mouth on how great it was. If I had really known about the conditions of the animals I honestly never would have gone. I felt I was actually in a third world country based on the conditions of the animals in the town of Havasu, the hill top, and even close to camp. Within the first 15 minutes of my hike in I witnessed a horse carrying who knows how much weight in coolers almost fall to its death slipping on a switchback corner then almost getting its neck broken because it was part of a roped group and the horses didn’t stop right away; random hikers were the ones who helped lift/push it to be rescued because the carrier person didn’t want to free it of its gear to be freed of the neck wrapped rope and the impending cliff edge, I saw many starving horses, starving dogs and some animals sick with diarrhea because they weren’t getting proper nutrition and vet care, and horses standing in extreme heat with bleeding open sores. I’ve uploaded pics I could take of horses without breaking tribal respect for no pictures. Being on tribal land and not having adequate cell service to report concerns until by then it could no longer be “tracked/found” was crushing. Please read all the reviews and follow the advice of others in that if you do decide to go DO NOT use a hiking guide company that contracts with the pack mules - force them to use the helicopter, do not use the pack mules yourself, and do not uses horses as a way out. Support the tribe’s needs and healing in other ways... with funding for food, education, etc and alternative options for supporting the tourism that helps them support their own families. Do right by the animals by not further funding this type of demand. Although it was pretty it wasn’t worth all the pain and suffering I saw around me. Also a sewer line broke up in town and was contaminating the water so enjoying the water was off limits the entire time we were there. All I really could and wanted to do the entire time was think of a good solution that would help end the cruelty yet work for the poor families, but I realized as long as people pay to use the pack animals, and there’s no federal intervention, this will continue. This wasn’t what I expected from what others raved about (some people choosing to ignore the problem?) and let’s just say I definitely didn’t get home feeling serene or relaxed from my “vacation” as expected. Go to Zion’s instead. Hike Angels landing, the narrows, or hike the Grand Canyon. Many other bucket list hikes with a good sense of challenge to chose from if you don’t have the stomach, aren’t ready to backpack in and out yourselves, or research a company that doesn’t perpetuate the mistreatment (I don’t know if one). Get it in writing though. I’ve seen companies say they were boycotting for change which made it to press, but they are back to using the mules. Do the research if you decide to use a guided service!

Other worldly!!! Awesome and challenging but totally worth it.

Does anybody know if you need permits for this trail?

Life changing hike!

It was my first time to backpack.
The trail was easy ( going to the village)
Going back to the hilltop is another story....

Watch my video on Youtube to get an idea on how the trail is.

Youtube account: Melissa DC Gomez

HIKE: Havasu Falls

Leave a comment fkr any questions or concerns. Let me know what you think.

Stunning and magnificent hike! Unfortunately, in a place with so much beauty is so much cruelty. PLEASE pack in and out your own gear and do not use the horses/mules or support tour companies that do. The hike is not that hard and if you need to, use the helicopter option. My husband and I witnesses first hand very few hikers carrying their own gear, even young 20 somethings. The horses are forced to RUN on steep, rocky and dangerous terrain overloaded with coolers, backpacks and supplies. The straps rub their skin raw. Many are tied together and forced to keep up. We witnessed a 350 pound wrangler being extremely gruff with a horse only to mount the poor animal and force him to run. Support the tribe with your money and be respectful of their gorgeous land. But help stop the demand for these animals to haul your gear. Help spread awareness of the plight of these precious animals. Many are tied up with short ropes in the sun with no access to food or water. There is no grass for grazing. The wranglers look stressed...you can imagine the pressure on them to get those horses up and down as fast as possible. Get in shape, take it slow, and be proud that whatever you need is on your own back.

We started the hike at 12:45 PM. Weather is OK in November to start late. Took about 4 hours to the village of Supai. A tribe of about 209 people. They are dependent on tourists but tourism is not developed ( a good thing) and adults remain aloof mostly. The children are a lot more friendly. The hike is nice, not too hard. Didn't need more than 1 liter of water per person.

hiking
1 month ago

Ok, so the profile picture you see here is not Beaver Falls itself. I believe that is Mooney Falls, and yes, you would see that on the way, but it
Seems like if you’re calling the hike “Beaver Falls” you should show a picture of Beaver Falls. Also, probably deceiving to call it a 24.4 mile hike. You’re probably not going to do it all in one day. You’re likely staying at the Campground 10 miles in and then maybe the next day you hike past Mooney Falls and then through the river to Beaver Falls. It’s probably 2-3 miles past Mooney. It is an amazing hike. You can’t even believe you’re still in Arizona as you think of Arizona as “Brown” and dry and this is green and lush. It’s probably 2-4 miles past Mooney. You have to cross the river 3 times and walk in it a 4th, so I’d wear water shoes or better yet, hiking sandals. We actually changed out of boots and hid our boots after the descent down Mooney Falls, which is treacherous. Seems like you’d want boots for that portion of the hike. But this hike is amazing and you should do it. Even of the relatively few people who ever get to see Havasu Falls, even fewer get to Beaver, so do it, and get that amazing sense of accomplishment.

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