#13 of 61 national parks in United States of America

Best trails in Grand Canyon National Park

18,208 Reviews
Looking for a great trail in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona? AllTrails has 123 great hiking trails, trail running trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Gearing up for a challenge? There are 59 hard trails in Grand Canyon National Park ranging from 2.6 to 43.2 miles and from 2,490 to 8,894 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Description

Grand Canyon National Park pretty much speaks for itself; anyone who has been there will know this. For those yet to go, the spectacular views of the Grand Canyon will consistently make your jaw drop, even for seasoned veterans of the park. It is no wonder it is one of the country's most popular National Parks. If you have limited time, you can drive along the rim (most people visit the South Rim, as it is more accessible from many other destinations and has more of the park's highlights) and be sure to stop at Grandview point - the southernmost point on Grand Canyon's south rim. The North Rim is often less crowded and has more solitary hiking trips. If you are feeling the need to get some light exercise, just walk along the Rim Trail as long as you want before turning around or taking a free shuttle bus back to the visitor center or the restaurant overlooking the vast canyon. The best way to appreciate the canyon is from the bottom, usually with a trip to the Bright Angel campground along the South Kaibab Trail and the Bright Angel Rrail. DO NOT attempt a round trip to the bottom and back in 1 day. Temperatures at the bottom can reach 110 degrees in the middle of the day, many people suffer from dehydration and heat stroke due to the dry climate along the steep trail. If attempting this (at least 2-day) hike, start very early in the morning to avoid the heat (do not hike between 10 and 2); By starting very early, you also get the added bonus of seeing the sunrise over the canyon walls, which will bring out some of the reddest rock you have ever seen. With more time to spare, there are several Native American reservations with tourist information, as well as several museums about natural history where you can attend ranger talks about the formation of this immense canyon, the history of its first inhabitants, and how the area is still changing today. Bring hiking boots, ample water, sunscreen, a hat, and check for info on backcountry permits if you plan to camp overnight. The South Rim is open all year, the North Rim is closed for the winter. For seasonal operating hours, see: https://www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/hours.htm Shuttle bus schedules and stops information can be found here: www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/shuttle-buses.htm. Please note some shuttles only run from March 1 - November 30 due to weather conditions. Entrance Fees Admission to Grand Canyon National Park is for seven days and includes both the North Rim and South Rim. (Current Prices went into effect on June 1, 2018) No refunds are given due to inclement weather. . Grand Canyon National Park Vehicle Permit - $35 (U.S. Dollars) Admits one single, private, non-commercial vehicle and all its passengers, up to a 15 person passenger van. Organized groups are not eligible for the vehicle permit. Grand Canyon National Park Motorcycle Permit - $30 (U.S. Dollars) Admits one single, private, non-commercial motorcycle and its passenger(s). Grand Canyon National Park Individual Permit - $20/person (U.S. Dollars) Admits one individual when entering by foot, bicycle, park shuttle bus, Grand Canyon Railway and private rafting trip. Individuals 15 years old and younger are admitted free of charge. Accessibility: The Interagency Access Pass for free or discounted admission for US Citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities is accepted here. All park shuttle buses are wheelchair accessible. However, wheelchairs larger than 30 inches by 48 inches long and most motorized scooters cannot fit on the shuttle buses. A Scenic Drive Accessibility Permit is available at the entrance gates and service centers for visitors with mobility disabilities. It allows access to some areas not open to public traffic but a state-issued parking placard is still required for parking in handicapped-accessible parking spaces. Many of the Interpretive Ranger Programs are wheelchair-accessible. Service animals are allowed on shuttles and must be on-leash at all times in the park. For more information about the accessible facilities and trails in the park, visit: https://www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm

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Map of trails in Grand Canyon National Park
Park information
Acreage:
1,217,403 acres
Contact
(928) 638-7888
Top trails (122)
#1 - South Kaibab, Phantom Ranch, and Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1468)
Length: 19.2 mi • Est. 10 h 44 m
SEASONAL CLOSURE: This area is subject to seasonal closure due to weather conditions. For more information, please visit https://www.nps.gov/grca/index.htm A combination of two extremely classic routes in the historic Grand Canyon National Park, this hike is full of the best views the canyon has to offer. Starting from the South Kaibab Trail, this easy-to-follow trail has awe inspiring views along the rim and also leads to the Colorado River. There are series of switchbacks leading up and down the canyon. It's challenging and sometimes steep, however, the adventure is worth it. If completing this trail as a day-hike, users suggest starting early. If backpacking this route, there are campsites along the way that take reservations such as at the Bright Angel Lodge. Seasonally, there are different bathrooms and water stations at the campsites such as on the Bright Angel Trail and at the Phantom Ranch. In the winter, water is only available at Indian Garden Campground which is maintained by the National Park Service- remember to grab a backcountry permit if staying overnight! The hike ends at the Grand Canyon Village for a refreshing reward of food and beverage options at the available restaurants, gift shops, and grocery stores. When trip planning, make sure to check the shuttle schedule before heading out! Otherwise, add an extra 4 miles to circle back to the parking lot. There is no shuttle or bus back from Bright Angel to South Kaibab trailhead. Find an updated shuttle schedule at https://www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/hiker-express-shuttle.htmShow more
#2 - Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1899)
Length: 15.3 mi • Est. 9 h 8 m
Bright Angel is the most popular trail in the Grand Canyon for good reason. The route starts right in Grand Canyon Village on the South Rim, with frequent rest houses and water along the way. The trail is also an out-and-back, so you can turn around whenever you want. The trail offers iconic views of the canyon, and for those up to challenge, access to the Colorado River. If planned accordingly, this is a must-do for adventurous visitors to the Grand Canyon. Many hikers take this trail to the various rest houses, Indian Garden, or Plateau Point. This trail can also be made into a thru-hike by combining it with either the North Kaibab Trail or the South Kaibab Trail, with the former taking you to the North Rim. The mapped route on this page takes the Bright Angel Trail down to the Colorado River and then returns the same way. Note that this can be an incredibly difficult route depending on weather, your physical fitness, and access to water. Do not underestimate this hike. The route on this page should almost never be attempted in one day, especially from May - September. This trail is also very narrow, further complicated by the amount of hikers and mules on the trail. Mules always have the right of way regardless of whether they’re going uphill or downhill.Show more
#3 - South Kaibab Trail to Ooh Aah Point
Grand Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1382)
Length: 1.7 mi • Est. 42 m
This "halfway" point to Cedar Ridge is a beautiful hike all in its self. If you want to get away from the crowd at the top of the rim ( it can be as busy as Disneyland) but if you don't want to go on an all day hike this is a good compromise. Always bring water when hiking any distance in the Grand Canyon.Show more
#4 - South Kaibab Trail to Cedar Ridge
Grand Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1262)
Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h
The South Kaibab Trail begins south of Yaki Point on Yaki Point Road. This route is a day hike to the mule hitching post at Cedar Ridge. It has incredible views for a relatively short hike and is overall a steep trek with no water and little shade. There is, however, water available seasonally at the trailhead. The upper portion of the trail may be extremely icy in winter or early spring and in summer months watch out for thunderstorms. This is the only trail at Grand Canyon National Park that holds true to a ridgeline descent. It is also the quickest way to the bottom and begins with a series of tight switchbacks. After these initial switchbacks, the trail traverses below Yaki Point to Ooh Ah Point (the first panoramic view of the canyon). From Ooh Ah Point on, the trail follows the top of a ridgeline and is consequently without shade. Several broad and steeply plunging switchbacks later, hikers reach Cedar Ridge. The South Kaibab Trail was constructed to bypass Ralph Cameron's Bright Angel Trail. Cameron, who owned the Bright Angel Trail, charged a toll to those who used it and fought dozens of legal battles over several decades to maintain his personal business rights. These legal battles inspired the Santa Fe Railroad to build its own alternative trail, the Hermit Trail, beginning in 1911 before the National Park Service went on to build the South Kaibab Trail beginning in 1924. In this way, Cameron inadvertently contributed to the greater network of trails currently available for use by canyon visitors.Show more
#5 - Three-Mile Resthouse via Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1113)
Length: 6.0 mi • Est. 3 h 27 m
Three-Mile Resthouse via Bright Angel Trail is one of the most popular trails in the Grand Canyon and is one of several Bright Angel Trail hikes available. It is easiest to navigate to the Bright Angel Lodge first, and then follow the map to the Bright Angel Trailhead. There are several parking areas and you may park anywhere where there are no “No parking” signs. People are always coming and going, so it is worth driving through the closest lots to see if you can snag a spot. If you don’t want to drive to the trailhead, the Blue Line Shuttle Bus is a great way to get to the trailhead, and it runs year-round. This route offers gorgeous views, so stop often for photos since the lighting will change throughout the hike. Go earlier to avoid the crowds. As mapped, it ends at Three-Mile Resthouse, but there are options for shortening and lengthening your journey. You can stop at the 1.5 Mile Resthouse (https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/arizona/15-mile-resthouse-via-bright-angel-trail), or continue on Bright Angel Trail to Indian Garden, Plateau Point, or all the way to the Colorado River. Even if it’s windy and cold at the South Rim when you begin, during the summer months it gets very hot and there is almost no wind to keep cool once you’re on the trail, so pace yourself and listen to the signs and what they indicate. BRING WATER. They do have fill up stations along the way, along with restrooms. Bring toilet paper as well!Show more
#6 - Grand Canyon Rim: Mules to Mather Point
Grand Canyon National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(813)
Length: 6.0 mi • Est. 2 h 26 m
The entire Rim Trail stretches from the South Kaibab Trailhead west to Hermit's Rest and is approximately 13 miles long. The trail is mostly paved and lined with markers to show you how far you've traveled both in feet and years (an earth-time line if you will). There is no water available along the trail but there are areas of shade. Also has types of rocks formed around the time marked on the trail. Very fun for kids and educational too. Mather Point is the closest Grand Canyon overlook to the visitor's center. Dogs are allowed on-leash on the Rim Trail but not on the shuttle busses so plan accordingly. Accessibility: There are is a paved parking lot at the Grand Canyon Visitor Center with at least 10 designated accessible spaces. There are wheelchair-accessible shuttle stops close to the trail and parking lots along the trail to access it at different points. The trail is paved, smooth, typically at least five feet wide, and has a lot of flat stretches, but the most accessible portion of the trail is the first 1.3 miles. After about 1.3 miles, there are several steep and very steep (over 8%) sections. Due to the grade after about 1.3 miles, wheelchair/mobility equipment or stroller users may need assistance or to turn around at this section. The trail may be slippery due to snow in the winter or thunderstorms in the summer so use caution. Mather Point is the most wheelchair and stroller friendly portion of this route and has its own trail page here: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/arizona/mather-point-via-visitor-centerShow more
#7 - South Kaibab Trail to Skeleton Point
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(979)
Length: 6.3 mi • Est. 3 h 31 m
#8 - Rim-to-Rim: North Kaibab to Grand Canyon Village
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(446)
Length: 22.7 mi • Est. Multi-day
This is a four-day route across the Grand Canyon throughout the national park that will leave users speechless. Though some users may be able to complete this hike in one day, the secret to the Rim-to-Rim North Kaibab to Grand Canyon Village route is to take it slow and enjoy the great outdoors here. While trekking this route, there are many things worthy of spending more time, including: taking time to picnic or swim at Ribbon Falls; spending a few hours at Phantom Ranch where users can get to know other hikers; stay the night at Cottonwood Camp where there is an incredible breeze during hot nights; And of course viewing the sunset at Plateau Point, which must be seen to match the hype. So, take time to profit from this four-day hike. Each day's trek will be roughly six miles, and users will have all kinds of time to actually see the Canyon and marvel at its beauty. When spending the night at Cottonwood Camp, users will have an unmatched opportunity to marvel at the lights from the North Rim Lodge twinkling a mile above. Spend another night at Bright Angel Campground, and enjoy a steak dinner at Phantom Ranch, cooked with local fresh meat. Users then recommend pending the final night at Indian Garden, and just relax. The fourth day's hike out is much easier, since users are already nearly halfway up the south rim, so it will be the perfect way to end the adventure. Get ready to enjoy this sublime nature!Show more
#9 - Plateau Point Trail via Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(825)
Length: 12.2 mi • Est. 7 h 3 m
#10 - 1.5 Mile Resthouse via Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(785)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 57 m
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