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I have hiked this route and the shorter outlaw trail as well. Both hikes are moderate and a great hiking experience. There are a couple of waterfalls behind the Big Tree. Our local Cub Scouts (7-11 years old) hiked this as well.

We started at the southern end and hiked north. The southern end parking is a fee area of $5. Great for kids and beginning hikers. No steep long hills to climb. My 8 year old hiked it with a day pack. He was wore out and said his feet were sore at the end. He is used to hiking. We hiked north and then back. I kept him on track and was trying to be quick heading north. My GPS showed 2.88 miles. On the way back I let him play and we took some side detours. My GPS showed 3.44 miles on the way back. For a total of 6.32 miles. I can't see the round trip being 5 miles especially with any stops. Also if you start at the north end of the trail as the "Getting There" directs you, parking is about 0.5 miles (according to google earth) from the trail head. Making the hike even longer. We saw many people on the trail. It was a Saturday. I am planning on bringing my younger son and hiking it one way. He loved the rock bluffs and overhangs. It would be a great place to let the kids wade in the water in the summer.

Great established campsites with river access. Not too much elevation change. Great for day hiking or overnight trips fun kicks.

Trail was not difficuult but nice wooded trail in the sipsey wilderness. The trail appeared to be well traveled but only say 2 hikers on the trip. it is a point to point trail but you can fork off on trail number 207 easily if you want to make it a longer hike. The creek was in view for most of the hike with rock cliffs and caves a long the way. We hiked in early November and the weather was gorgeous!

The first 2 miles is following an old logging or forestry road to the canyon. Fairly uninspiring except for the old cemetery along the way. it is well kept with many hand carved stones from the 1800's. Once into the canyon, there is a creek crossing to intersect with 209. if the water is very low, one may be able to step stones across, otherwise, wading will be required here. Very scenic once in the canyon.

Be sure to note that the little leg back to 201 where 209 intersects with 206 is an unmarked creek crossing. there is currently (11/09/17) a smallish log spanning the creek. thin and very wobbly. Be very careful crossing!

The first 2 miles is following an old logging or forestry road to the canyon. Fairly uninspiring except for the old cemetery along the way. it is well kept with many hand carved stones from the 1800's. Once into the canyon, there is a creek crossing to intersect with 209. if the water is very low, one may be able to step stones across, otherwise, wading will be required here. Very scenic once in the canyon.

Be sure to note that the little leg back to 201 where 209 intersects with 206 is an unmarked creek crossing. there is currently (11/09/17) a smallish log spanning the creek. thin and very wobbly. Be very careful crossing!

hiking
1 month ago

Big Tree is a truly spiritual experience! It left me at a loss for words!

One of my favorite camping places. Easy enough that I have taken my 5 year old niece camping off the trail.

This is absolutely an awesome trail I’ve hiked it many times and always love going back

it's recommend to buy a map at the ranger station

Mostly flat as it follows along the river. There is only a few campsites along the river, mostly near 224 and 203/207.
It is well shaded. A few small waterfalls.

hiking
2 months ago

Great short hike. Good for older kids. Off the beaten path a bit unlike most of the Sipsey Wilderness trails so we had the place to ourselves which was awesome. Worth the time just to see the bluff walls but the many picture perfect waterfalls kept us mesmerise.

Great trails of all kinds, there is a big difference between north and south sipsey wilderness but this trail lets you see both, difficult to explain but while hiking you'll understand it.