Help keep our trails and parks open during COVID-19 by committing to social distancing. Some trails or park services may be closed this weekend so check with local authorities before heading out.
Learn more

Best trails in Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve

6,809 Reviews
Looking for a great trail in Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve, Oahu? AllTrails has 17 great hiking trails, trail running trails, forest trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Gearing up for a challenge? There are 10 hard trails in Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve ranging from 2.4 to 16.6 miles and from 229 to 2,795 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Show more
Map of trails in Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
Park information
Helpful links
Top trails (17)
#1 - Moanalua/Kamananui Valley Trail
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(642)
Length: 10.3 mi • Est. 6 h 9 m
The trail begins at the end of Moanalua Valley at Moanalua Valley Park. The trail starts as a road barred by a green gate. The road eventually turns to an unimproved road and later a narrow trail. The trail to the top of the Haiku Stairs (Stairway to Heaven) is also on this trail approximately 2 miles past the trailheadShow more
#2 - Mau'umae Trail (Pu'u Lanipo Trail)
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(199)
Length: 6.6 mi • Est. 4 h 34 m
A moderate to difficult hike, and an interesting climb up and down 3 peaks rather than all up going and all down coming back. Half of the hike is narrow track through 3 foot high brush so the suggestion to wear pants is a good one. Take plenty of water and some food, and depending on your phone battery a portable charger as well. Be aware of possible weather changes and do not attempt this hike if it is very windy.Show more
#3 - Pu'u Pia Trail
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(388)
Length: 1.9 mi • Est. 1 h 15 m
#4 - Tripler Ridge Trail
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(287)
Length: 8.9 mi • Est. 5 h 21 m
This hike is a long uphill trek with excellent views of the valleys on either side of Tripler ridge. For those feeling really adventurous, you can continue onto the connector trails. There is no "end of trail" sign, and you can turn around early if you like.Show more
#5 - Kulana'ahane to H-3 Summit Saddle
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(106)
Length: 10.5 mi • Est. 5 h 35 m
Parking is at the Moanalua Valley Park (open from 7am - 7pm) at the end of Ala Aolani Street. Follow the Kamananui Valley Trail for approximately 2.5 miles. Turn left at the Kulana'ahane Trail Head sign and cross a stream bed. Keep going straight; if you make a right turn after crossing the stream, you will end up on the Moanalua Middle (Keana'akamano) Ridge Trail. You will make approximately 23 stream crossings. You will then come to an "End of Maintained Trail" sign. Go past the sign and make you way up the ridge to the saddle summit. As you climb will be able to see the waterfall to the right of the radar dish at the top of the Stairway to Heaven. Show more
#6 - Mo'ole Valley Falls Trail
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(133)
Length: 3.1 mi • Est. 2 h 1 m
#7 - Waimano Ridge Trail
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(123)
Length: 16.6 mi • Est. 8 h 42 m
This is a very diverse trail with a combination of manmade ditch structures, natural streams, ridge crossings, and switchbacks. Segment 1: The Tunnels The start of the trail is graded and wide. It traverses a long fence at the start and finally turns into the reserve with a view towards Pearl Harbor and Waianae. Don't forget to take the right fork in order to stay on the main trail. Taking the left fork will traverse a shorter loop hike into the valley. Continuing on the main trail on the right will take you past the many Waimano ditches and tunnels. Some dry enough for you to walk through (watch your head). On passing tunnel #7 the trail will drop down to cross a feeder stream. Once you cross, look back to see tunnel #8. Climb up and forward, you will then see the state hiking sign. Going left will take you through tunnel #9 (one of the longest) while going right walks you past the tunnel. Both will meet back up just before the #17 scout rest post BSA Kamehameha District Post 540. Segment 2: The Valley Stream Nature From the scout rest post, take the trail heading down into the valley. There are three more tunnels that are less visible, plus a number of ditch features. The trail will also cross Waimano stream and take a series of switchbacks that start to gain elevation. This area is a beautiful respite featuring giant fan palm, huge stands of tall royal palm trees, lots of great koa trees, and steep drop-offs to the stream below. It also houses lots of endemic and foreign birds alike. Segment 3: The Never-ending Switchbacks At this point the path begins to narrow and can be fairly overgrown if not recently maintained. The trees are smaller and Ohia is in abundance. Keep a look out for the Lobelia and Ko'li'i. Although, it always seems like yet another switchback, take the time to enjoy the cool mountain breezes and clouds. Sounds of water will gurgle up to the swtichbacks as you wonder where is the KST. Once you reach the summit terminus the view of Waihe'e Valley, Kaneohe Bay, and Kualoa is very rewarding. Show more
#8 - Moanalua Valley and Tripler Ridge Trail Loop
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(62)
Length: 9.4 mi • Est. 6 h 21 m
#9 - Kulepeamoa Loop
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(84)
Length: 6 mi • Est. 3 h 45 m
This trail starts the end of Anolani Street, and takes you past high California grass, before dropping to the Pia Valley Stream. The trail then ascends Kulepeamoa Ridge. Be prepared for a good steep climb, but you will be rewarded with clear views of the valley and lots of growing sandalwood. The ridge itself is a nice contrast of pine trees, to guava, then to Ohia and Uluhe. It is a bit of a rollercoaster with some fairly narrow sections. As you approach the KST, there is a rope section that requires the rope in order to ascend. There is a good new black tape rope besides the existing printer cables. Its well secured at the top, but as always test before using. The last section will work your legs, especially if it is muddy. Once at the top you'll have great 360 views of Waimanalo, Hawaii Kai/Koko Head, Honolulu, the airport coral reef runway, Olomana, Kailua, and Kaneohe. Once at the Hawaii Loa, it's an easy way down to the guava junction. This section is a slip and slide and you'll probably grab guava trees all the way to the valley. Once in Pia Valley, it's hard to find the trail as there are many big tree blown downs. Follow the dry stream bed till you find the trail again. There are a number of dry pools that are nice when the water flows and an interesting rock wall on the west bank. This section then connects back to the ridge junction.Show more
#10 - Lua'alaea Falls Trail
Honolulu Watershed Forest Reserve
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarGray Star(49)
Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 57 m
One of the many waterfalls in Manoa Valley. This one starts from the same trailhead as Manoa Falls but is much less travelled.Show more
Showing results 1 - 10 of 17