Best trails in Ogden Water Country Park, West Yorkshire, England

191 Reviews
Explore the most popular trails in Ogden Water Country Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
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Map of trails in Ogden Water Country Park, West Yorkshire, England
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Top trails (3)
#1 - Ogden Reservoir
Ogden Water Country Park
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Length: 3.1 mi • Est. 1 h 35 m
This circular makes its way around Odgen Reservoir, directly hugging the shoreline.Show more
#2 - The Switzerland of Yorkshire Circular
Ogden Water Country Park
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Length: 9.3 mi • Est. 4 h 48 m
Hebden Dale was once known as 'The Switzerland of Yorkshire'. This route starting from Hebden Bridge station briefly follows the Rochdale canal before climbing the steep Cuckoo steps and the escarpment edge of Colden Clough to reach fascinating Heptonstall. It is then downhill to New Bridge in Hebden Dale to follow the valley to Gibson Mill before climbing again to Walshaw and the edge of the open moorland into the next valley of Crimsworth Dean. The route of the Haworth to Hebden Bridge Walk is used for the return. Lets get clear a little of the local naming. Hardcastle Crags is the name by which everyone knows the valley of Hebden Dale through which flows Hebden Water. This deep cut vale is richly wooded and abundant in wildlife. At Heptonstall it is most unusual to find two churches in one churchyard. The original church, dedicated to the martyred archbishop St. Thomas a' Becket, was damaged in a storm in 1847. Rather than having it repaired, a new church was built alongside instead. In the old churchyard is the gravestone of David Hartley, who was a notorious counterfeiter of coins. He was so successful that he almost succeeded in destabilising the country's currency. Hartley was hanged in York in 1770. Heptonstall was of greater importance than Hebden Bridge until the Industrial Revolution. The main street of Towngate is reminiscent of Howarth, the home of the Bronte sisters, but without the crowds! Gibson Mill is a one time cotton mill built in 1800, it closed in the 1890's becoming a curiously sited dance hall and even a roller-skating rink in the mid 20th century. Today the whole area is NT owned - cafe, visitor centre and shop. Tours of the mill are available with a guide. In Hebden Bridge there are many points of interest some of which are - The Old Packhorse Bridge dated 1510, St George's Bridge erected in 1892 and made in cast iron alongside which is the chimney of Bridge Mill, then there is  St. George's Square where the sundial sculpture installed in 2008, represents a knife used for cutting the grooves in 'fustian' cloth. Finally the Rochdale Canal has great charm. The Hebden Bridge Canal Basin was built in 1893 as a loading bay for boats, today it is a Marina alongside is the tourist information centre.Show more
#3 - Hardcastle Crags and Hebden Water Circular
Ogden Water Country Park
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Length: 2.5 mi • Est. 1 h 21 m
This is a circular walk around the wooded Pennine valley of Hardcastle Crags, near Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire. Owned by the National Trust the valley comprises a beautiful shallow river, Hebden Water with steep wooded valley sides and you will have chance to discover lots of wildlife plus some industrial archaeology along the way. If you have children with you, you may wish to bring along crayons and paper as there are several engraved markers around the site, showing the various leaves and seeds in the woodland. The walk follows a mixture of dirt and rocky paths, which can be muddy in part and can also be very slippery when wet. There are no gates or stiles on route but you will need to negotiate several flights of steps and some uneven climbs through sections of rocks. The outward leg largely follows the riverside path whilst the return journey climbs steeply up to the valley top ridge which has steep drops down to the side. If you would rather avoid this part, you can choose to return via the valley's quiet vehicle track or back along the riverside path, the way you came. Dogs are welcome in the site. There are picnic tables in several places along the route and there are public toilets at the start and about half way round.Show more