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Best bird watching trails in Peak District National Park, England

3,920 Reviews
Explore the most popular bird watching trails in Peak District National Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of bird watching trails in Peak District National Park, England
Park information
Acreage:
355,200 acres
Contact
+44 1629 816200
Top trails (157)
#1 - Dove Stone Reservoir Circular Walk
Peak District National Park
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Length: 8.2 mi • Est. 4 h 19 m
Note: As of September 18, 2020 users have reported that the art of the track around Yeoman Hey Reservoir is not accessible - a huge message saying "Danger, Shooting in progress, Footpath temporarily closed". Instead you can cross over between the reservoirs and take a route up (quite steep), it will lead you back to the main track. Admission is free, but donations are encouraged. Parking is pay-and-display, unless you are a Blue Badge holder or RSPB member. Parking cost: 60 pounds/3 hours, or 1.30 pounds for the day. Amazing walk with stunning views, a waterfall, and rock formations. Note that the scramble to the waterfall may be difficult for some. Users report that this trail does get packed during peak hours.Show more
#2 - Baslow Circular Walk via Curbar Edge and Froggatt
Peak District National Park
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Length: 7.7 mi • Est. 4 h 9 m
#3 - Kinder Scout and Mam Tor Circular
Peak District National Park
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Length: 10.7 mi • Est. 5 h 17 m
Parking at Edale is £6 for 10 hours or £10 for the day. You will find arguably one of the best views in England from the summit of this trail. Located in the Dark Peak area of the National Park, the Kinder Scout and Mam Tor Circular has amazing scenery and varied terrain. Show more
#4 - Kinder Scout from Edale
Peak District National Park
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Length: 8.9 mi • Est. 4 h 48 m
This path begins with a steady climb into a scramble on your way to the moors up a river bed. There is a clear path on the top of the moors until the right turn toward Kinder Scout. There are no marked paths after this point (make sure to download the AllTrails map). The moors are hard; deep drops to boggy bottoms then short climbs to get out of the stream beds before reaching Pennie Way. From here, the rest of the route is easy.Show more
#5 - Flash and Three Shires Head
Peak District National Park
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Length: 3.7 mi • Est. 2 h 1 m
A circular walk in the Staffordshire Moors. The walk starts from the village of Flash which claims to be the highest village in England, it is a rather windswept location high on the western gritstone moors. Flash was a tough place to live for farmers, most having to find extra employment in local mills or from mining coal. Most of the old farmsteads are now private houses. The main part of the village consists of a few cottages, a church, a pub and a village school. Flash was noted as the centre for counterfeiting money, which became known as 'flash'. In the 18th century, button presses were used to make counterfeit coins .Some of the gang were hanged at Chester after a servant girl gave them away. Well dressings are held in Flash in the height of summer, a custom dating from medieval time which marks an acknowledgement of the importance of clean water and honours the local spring source. Alongside this runs the Tea Pot Parade, an event where a Marching Band accompanies the villagers carrying a papier-mâché Tea Pot. The teapot parade tradition dates back to 1846, a time when there was no NHS and a Friendly Society was formed. Everyone in the village gave a donation, which was put into a teapot, and the money was then given out to villagers in times of sickness, unemployment and bereavement. The society had more than 700 members at its peak. On the walk you will need to cross several stiles and pass through several gates. A stream is crossed by either stepping stones or a bridge. Some areas of the paths can be muddy and waterlogged and many sections are stony and uneven. The path up over the moors on the latter part of the walk is sometimes indistinct and is fairly steep with boggy and uneven sections. You will be sharing many of the paths with sheep, so take particular care with dogs. On a clear day many fine views can be seen. There are no public toilets along the walk. The correct map is OL24 White Peak. Allow 2 hours. Show more
#6 - The Great Ridge: Hollins Cross, Rick Tor and Lose Hill
Peak District National Park
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Length: 5 mi • Est. 3 h 3 m
This walk takes you from the car park on Mam Tor, up to the top and then along the ridge to Lose Hill. There's a bit of up and down, but the route stays at a good height above the Hope Valley to the south and the Vale of Edale to the north thereby commanding fantastic views in any direction you look. With good weather the distant views are excellent. Fom Lose Hill, you can get a great view down the Derwent Valley taking in many landmarks. Navigationally this walk is really simple, just follow the ridge to the end and return along the same path. The slope up to Back Tor requires care over the rocks, but the rest is nice and straightforward. The western end of this walk tends to be busy with many people flocking up to the top of Mam Tor or to take off in their hang-gliders. But whilst a popular spot, there's plenty of space. The term "The Great Ridge" was coined by W.A.Poucher and first used in his book "Peak Panorama, Kinder Scout to Dovedale" published in 1946 to describe the "great barrier which rises between Edale and Castleton." It is quite unique in the way it forms a high wall between the two valleys and as Poucher noted in 1946 there's a stone wall that runs along the whole length, although it is rather dilapidated in many places, more so now than when Poucher was strolling these hills over 50 years ago! Just down from the start point are the Blue John caverns and mines, all within a short walk away if interested. The road to or from Castleton has changed over the years. A road used to run up the side of Mam Tor from Castleton, but this has slipped away as parts of Mam Tor have fallen away. Repairs to the road have now stopped and in consequence the route is now via Winnats Pass, an amazing route through a deep limestone gorge. Mam Tor has been referred to as the Shivering Mountain to reflect its crumbling nature. It's not that stable now due to the alternating layers of shale and gritstone. This does, however, provide a great place for hang gliders. There are few days during the summer months when there are not one or two of the gliders soaring the currents from the mountain slopes. Quite fascinating to watch too. The ridge is criss-crossed by other paths as a quick look at maps and the ridge itself will show. These were originally used by people walking to work from one valley to the other. You can still sometimes see children walking across to or from school, but now it's mostly walkers! But these paths do present great opportunities to extend this walk.Show more
#7 - Edale and Grindsbrook Circular
Peak District National Park
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Length: 15.6 mi • Est. 8 h 5 m
#8 - Monsal Trail
Peak District National Park
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Length: 9.7 mi • Est. 4 h 49 m
The Monsal Trail is a traffic free route along the former Midland Railway line for walkers, cyclists, horse riders and wheelchair users through some of the Peak District's most spectacular limestone dales. Most of the route was opened to the public in 1981. Over the years its tunnels were slowly converted into safe passages for users of the Trail. The public can now experience the full length of the former railway route at their own pace and see breathtaking views from numerous look-out points.Show more
#9 - Thor's Cave
Peak District National Park
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Length: 5.3 mi • Est. 2 h 58 m
#10 - Ashford, Monsal Dale and Shacklow Wood
Peak District National Park
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Length: 5.8 mi • Est. 3 h 3 m
On a late spring day this relatively gentle walk comes alive with bird song, lambs, bluebells and the scent of wild garlic! The climbs in this route are not too fierce although the path is steep and rocky heading into Great Shacklow Wood. However the effort is well rewarded as you walk down through the wood - this is a beautiful path and tends to be relatively quiet and peaceful. It is a popular path to Monsal Head as many will stop in Ashford and walk the gentle slope up and admire the views down Upperdale and of Monsal Viaduct, now closed to trains and part of the Monsal Trail. There's a choice of refreshments at Monsal Head. Tea or coffee, ice creams, a restaurant in the hotel and enormous helpings of fabulous food washed down with wonderful beers in the pub. In winter there's a log fire that is sure to warm you through if the beer and food doesn't. Once down into the valley the River Wye twists its way majestically down Monsal Dale before you cross the main A6 road from Bakewell to Buxton and head up the sharp but short climb to Great Shacklow Wood. Once up the slope its a quiet, relaxing and rather wonderful stroll back to Ashford.Show more
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