#3 of 50 provincial parks in Alberta

Best camping trails in Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada

2,856 Reviews
Explore the most popular camping trails in Peter Lougheed Provincial Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of camping trails in Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada
Park information
Acreage:
75,120 acres
Contact
403-678-0760
Top trails (23)
#1 - Sarrail Ridge via Rawson Lake Trail
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1012)
Length: 7.0 mi • Est. 5 h 11 m
PROTECTIVE CLOSURE: This area is subject to closure due to habitat protection. For more information, please visit: https://albertaparks.ca/parks/kananaskis/kananaskis-country/advisories-p The Sarrail Ridge via Rawson Lake Trail offers users so much in any season, as it meanders to the lake and then to the stunning ridge. The hike to the lake is an easy, gradual climb on a clear path through wonderful meadows that are either green, flowering and full of wildlife or covered in snow and hosting elk and other animals. The view of the lake from here with the cliff faces in the background is fantastic, and is a classic Canadian Rocky Mountain lake! Once departed from the easier footing close to the lake, the hike to the ridge is a steep, mostly straight line climb up a path that is sometimes rocky and sometimes loose dirt, or ice and snow in winter. Close to the bottom, there is a small rocky section that is traversed with the aid of a rope, and after the rope there is a narrow path up a steep slope covered in small trees and loose dirt. Finally, there is a rock covered switchback path to the top - and the views from the summit are amazing. The descent can be a little bit harrowing through the area with the loose dirt. Make sure to have good shoes because the dirt will slide underneath users, and gloves will keep hands clean, with extra equipment like poles providing extra support. Users normally take it slow and easy on the descent, so it is not too bad. Since there are no true switchbacks up the slope, users often crowd up in areas by accident since there are no areas to take breaks. Users recommend getting out early to make this easier and less crowded. No matter the season, bring layers! Temperatures can swings greatly based on the wind and sun in any season, with highs in the 30s during summer and lows in the deep freezing temperatures in fall even. This area is common for many people to see wildlife like a Grizzly, so come prepared with bear spray. Additionally, this is deep wilderness and is popular for mosquitoes in the summer, so on non-windy days expect to wear bug spray. Winter Conditions: The trail after the lakes/opening travels through AVALANCHE TERRAIN. Do not venture up the headwall to the pass unless users 1. Have the Gear (beacon, probe, shovel), 2. Training ( Avalanche Course), 3. Practice (there is a beacon pit at the trailhead), 4. Forecast (Avalanche Report).Show more
#2 - Upper Kananaskis Lake Trail
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(513)
Length: 9.5 mi • Est. 4 h 50 m
PROTECTIVE CLOSURE: This area is subject to closure due to habitat protection of bears during the summer season. For more information, please visit: https://www.albertaparks.ca/parks/kananaskis/peter-lougheed-pp/advisories/ The Upper Kananaskis Lake Trail is a scenic, adventurous, and exciting day hike for any user - including families! This route follows the recommended counter-clockwise direction as it takes users through the most scenic part during the first four kilometres, so families can turn around from the Interlakes, which is the rockiest part of this trail instead of the full loop. Once crossed the Interlakes and users proceed further, it is best to complete the loop since it gets much easier past the small rockpile area. After crossing the stream on a wooden bridge, most of the last 6 kilometres of the trail is under a thick cover of overgrown forest, which is a great treat if the weather is poor or the sun is too hot. During winter, this section of trail can be snowy and slushy as it is close to water, so coming prepared with proper footwear is a good idea. This is the area that is prime Grizzly habitat, so it is common that users encounter large predators here - and should make lots of noise to bring bear bells, whistles, spray, and more. Moose are also commonly seen here, and they are less agitated by human activity in the area, so proceed with caution around them. This trail is by no means very technical or challenging, but this trail has a bit of everything. Users commonly suggest that this is one of the most scenic hikes outside of the nearby national parks in any season, thanks to the waterfalls, a landslide rock garden, beautiful lakes, and so much more. Most of the elevation gain is within the first three kilometres before going down the rocky avalanche areas, which can be super hot and without shade in summer, and this part of the area is a quiet trail. Users also have plenty of areas to take breaks, like at the multiple campground areas in the peninsula. It got noisier and busier when getting closer to the start point of Rawson Lake, since this is where the rocky beach and stunning views of the lake and mountains are. Past the metal bridge connecting the trail separated by the torrential waterfall and closer to the starting point of the short version trail, the first parking lot, another option for users to park at. In this area, users can continue and walk on the picturesque 1.5 kilometre dam road past the parking lot and back into the trail along the lake in the woods again for even more of a challenge!Show more
#3 - Burstall Pass Trail
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(485)
Length: 10.2 mi • Est. 5 h 7 m
The Burstall Pass Trail begins on a wide, gently-sloped former logging road that takes users past the famous and beautiful Burstall lakes. After the lakes the trail becomes narrow with more roots and then you trek through the open meadow in The Valley, crossing multiple creeks. The signs are easy to follow, with pictures of green signs with a hiker and red/orange marker above the sign to the opening of the next trail. This is where the incline starts until again it opens up to a flat meadow with wildflowers for a short time. Eventually users are back in the trees with a continuous incline until reaching the viewpoint where users can see bird wood, sir Douglas and everything in between. Take the small side path to go down to see the view, which is highly worth it. The trail gets a bit more technical in the middle, but not really difficult. There’s some moderate climbing in places and users often find a few sections a little tricky, but very manageable. The meander across the marshy flats between the mountains was fun, but users often report that summer is the best time to be here due to winter and fall being a wet time to cross some of the meadows and creeks. The final section of the trail up from the far side of the flats has some steepish points, but the views are oh so worth it with mountain views in every direction and stunning fall colors! Since the trail crosses several creeks, sandals are recommended for creek-crossings if visiting between June and July. During the fall, the larches are on full display as they turn bright yellow. The view at the pass offers a beautiful look at the surrounding forest, and views of Banff National Park. Users should also review these important Winter Conditions: The trail past the lakes/opening travels through AVALANCHE TERRAIN. Do not venture up the headwall to the pass unless users 1. Have the Gear (beacon, probe, shovel), 2. Training (Avalanche Course), 3. Practice (there is a beacon pit at the trailhead), 4. Forecast (Avalanche Report)Show more
#4 - Pocaterra Cirque
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(206)
Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 2 h 41 m
The trail starts on a wide path and then branches off to the left through an open area before entering the forest. It continues through the forest for the first 2 km. There are many branched trails that eventually converge, which can be a little confusing as there are no signs. ⁣ After the first 2 km, the trail opens up to expansive views of the surrounding mountains and forests of larch trees! There are consistently amazing views for the rest of the hike. The trail gains steady elevation but is mostly gradual and leveled out in between, with some steeper sections. It passes through beautiful larch forests and by a pretty lake with gorgeous reflections from the trees on the water. At the junction, the trail to the cirque continues to the left. It is a steep uphill climb from here until the end, leading above the trees and across an exposed rocky terrain. The trail ends at a ridge with gorgeous views overlooking the mountains and valleys. The trail continues back down along the same way.Show more
#5 - Northover Ridge Loop Trail
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(78)
Length: 20.6 mi • Est. Multi-day
Northover Ridge is a long loop trail that should not be attempted by anyone who is less than an experienced hiker. There are some who will day-hike this in a very long, strenuous day, and others who take 3-5 days stopping at the backcountry campsites. Portions of the trail are unmaintained, requiring crawling under and over dead fall, short scrambles, loose scree, etc. If the weather cooperates, the views are amazing though, more than worth the effort if you are fit enough.Show more
#6 - Three Isle Lake
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
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Length: 14.2 mi • Est. 8 h 25 m
#7 - The Point
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
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Length: 5.1 mi • Est. 2 h 55 m
#8 - Turbine Canyon to Three Isle Lake Backpacking Loop
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
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Length: 29.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
Backpacking loop with amazing views! Beatty Lake backcountry campground does not require a permit, however Turbine Canyon campground does. You could also camp at Three Isle Lake rather than Beatty Lake if you prefer.Show more
#9 - Forks Campground
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
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Length: 9.4 mi • Est. 5 h 32 m
#10 - Turbine Canyon and Maude Lake via Maude-Lawson Trail
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(43)
Length: 21.5 mi • Est. 11 h 40 m
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