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Best trails in Northern Ireland

1,816 Reviews
Ready to check out the best trails in Northern Ireland? AllTrails has 166 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 82 easy trails in Northern Ireland ranging from 0.7 to 15.4 miles and from 0 to 1,371 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Northern Ireland
Top trails (166)
#1 - Slieve Donard Trail
Mourne Mountains Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 4 h 9 m
#2 - Slieve Binnian Summit Tor and North Tor
Mourne Mountains Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 6.7 mi • Est. 4 h 2 m
This is a half day loop hike starting and finishing in Carrick Little car park that takes in the Summit Tor and North Tor. This hike features some excellent views of the Annalong Wood and valley, as well as fantastic views of the Silent Valley Reservoir and Ben Crom. Follow the road from the car park north and cross a stile at a gate. The Mourne Wall is on your left. Follow the wall steeply upwards. You pretty much stick to the wall for most of the accent. As you approach the summit Tor stay to the right hand side of the wall, as this is the easiest approach to the Summit Tor. Walk around the summit to get the best views. Leave the summit and head north towards the North Tor. The trail down continues to the left of this rock to the saddle between Binnian and Slievelamagan. At the saddle turn right, do not accend Slievelamagan. This trail will swing around and eventually you will see Annalong Wood on your left. Follow the wood back to the car park.Show more
#3 - Giant's Causeway
Causeway Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 2.4 mi • Est. 1 h 22 m
A walk out to the fantastic Giant's Causeway. If you continue along the trail, you'll get wonderful views of the Antrim Coast and a look down on the Causeway from above. From the visitor centre, follow a tarred roadway & footpath which descends down a steep slope, until you arrive at The Stookans or Windy Gap, as locals refer to it evident as here the walker is exposed to the wild Atlantic elements. From here continue along the tarred roadway (always taking care to mind the popular tourist shuttle bus service) and quickly the first signs of the hexagonal causeway stones will appear. The Giants Causeway is made up of 3 promontories the Little Causeway (1st feature the walker meets), the Middle Causeway (better known as the Honeycomb) which has spectacularly precise hexagonal features, followed by the The Grand Causeway. In this immediate area, evocative place names & features abound Wishing Chair, Wishing Well & Giants Gate (all connected with Finn MacCool folklore). Many tourists on strict time operator deadlines, rarely go beyond the stones, but for this walk negotiate the Giants Gate & proceed into Port Noffer (The bay of the giant). Here a different world exists, with marginally more sheltered conditions allowing more diverse maritime meadows & saltmarsh vegetation to establish. Cast an eye for Sea aster, Yellow iris & other rich plant life. Meadow pipits & many warblers in summer can be found with sedge warblers & grasshopper warbler not uncommon. And high amongst the crags the dominant birds are nesting fulmars, and an occasional lone pair of ravens. Passing the Giants Boot, climb up the slope to what looks like a giant church organ (in geological terms huge columns of basalt make the organ pipes, hence the local name of The Organ. From here the cliff path continues past The Organ for another 400 yards to the headland. At the point of the headland, there is a viewing platform which looks into the spectacularly named Amphitheatre. Here all manner of lava flows can be observed, as well as the dynamic nature of the cliffs. Look for the Giants Harp & Eyes? At this point the cliff path is closed off for safety reasons, due to unstable cliffs (a number of significant rockfalls occurred here in 1994). From here, return to The Organ, and instead of retracing your steps to the stones climb the steep path, with lots & lots of steps. Known as the Shepherds Path, these 162 steps will take you to the cliff top & on to the North Antrim Cliff Path. At the top of the steps, turn right and after half a mile you will be back at the visitor centre & car park You may even have earned a Finn MacCool Steak at the Causeway Hotel for your efforts at completing this iconic Irish walk!Show more
#4 - Devils Coach Road from Carrick Little Car Park
Mourne Mountains Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 9.1 mi • Est. 5 h 26 m
A steep accent of the very well known Devil's Coach Road Gully on Slieve Beg in the Mourne Mountains. This is a full day hike that starts and finishes in the Carrick Little car park. There is plenty of parking here, however the car park tends to fill up. You can also park along the road if there are no spaces available. The Devil's Coachroad is most definitely a scrambling route. The rocks are very loose so be very careful. Midway up the gradient eases, so it's easier to move up. Again large rocks were displaced so be careful. A helmet would not be a bad idea. Near the top there is a very narrow V shape that needs to be "climbed". It's only about 10m or so but it is the hardest part of the Gully to negotiate. The route to the right at the top is said to be easier. Again be careful as a fall would be painful at the very best. Once at the top it's an easy decent into the col between Slieve Beg and Cove. The accent up Cove is steep but child's play after the Coach Road. Descend from Cove into the col between Cove and Slievelamagan. Again another fairly steep accent will take you to the top of Lamagan. Note if you are tired you can take a path heading east from the col to cut out the summit. Decent from Lamagan into the col between Slieve Binnian and Slievelamagan. From here the path turns left to re-join the trail back along the Annalong forest back to the car park.Show more
#5 - Cavehill Trail
Cave Hill Country Park
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Length: 4.1 mi • Est. 2 h 24 m
This trail offers incredible views of the city. Opening hours vary with season (visit site for more information) http://www.belfastcity.gov.uk/leisure/parks-openspaces/Park-6622.aspxShow more
#6 - Slieve Donard via Brandy Pad
Mourne Mountains Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 6.6 mi • Est. 4 h 31 m
#7 - Culcaigh Legnabrocky Boardwalk
Culcaigh Mountain Park
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Length: 5.7 mi • Est. 3 h 40 m
This path is a steady climb over gravel, boardwalk, and dirt trails to the mountain face. From the summit, there are views of the glacier lake Lough Atona. Weather can change quickly so bring layers and rain gear.Show more
#8 - Glenariff Scenic Trail Circular
Glenariff Forest
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Length: 5.5 mi • Est. 2 h 53 m
This trail provides spectacular views of Glenariife and the surrounding area. This stunning walk starts by dropping down into the valley with waterfalls on the way then climbs the other side to open views of the coast, before then curving back over the head of the valley over a little bridge back to the car park. Reasonable fitness is needed as it is hilly in places, especially some steep bits at the start, but well worth the effort. The trails are well maintained. Show more
#9 - Divis via Ridge Trail Loop
Belfast, Antrim, Northern Ireland
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Length: 6.2 mi • Est. 3 h 18 m
#10 - Trassey Track to Brandy Pad Circular Walk
Mourne Mountains Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 8.3 mi • Est. 5 h 13 m
Showing results 1 - 10 of 166