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    Jeffrey Sinder saved Serpentine Trail

    5 months ago

    Jeffrey Sinder saved Chinquapin Trail

    5 months ago

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed Hazelnut Trail

    11 months ago

    Hike took place on a warm weekday in late October. The trail was lightly traveled. I saw more California Quail than other fellow hikers. I started the hike at the entrance close by the nicely kept up visitor center near the parking lot. Note that the actual length of the Hazelnut Trail is 3.7 miles long. The end of the trail dumps out on to Weiler Ranch Trail. Weiler Ranch Trail is actually an old gravel farm road that after a pleasant enough level walk between two valleys leads you back to the parking lot and visitor center about one mile away. The Hazelnut Trail provides a good workout. It is all up and then down. At the start of the trail I ran into three wild turkeys and a buck deer that were having a standoff on the trail. The trail is wide and well maintained. There are trail makers along the way that indicate how far you have hiked. Very nice. You hike up to a enchanted eucalyptus forest that provides a good place to rest and smell the fragrant leaves and nuts of the trees. Funny, even though eucalyptus tress are non-native trees to California, they are in my mind are as much of the state’s landscape as our redwood trees, Monterey cypress, Joshua trees, and giant sequoias. How these trees were established here at a elevation of 900 feet (the trail starts at about 200 feet) where there are no roads or manmade structures is strange. Excellent views of Montara Mountain to the south and the glimpses of the Pacific Ocean and Mount Tamalpais to the west and north. The trail then leads to steep downward switchbacks to Weiler Ranch Trail. San Pedro Valley County Park offers excellent restrooms. I am glad my tax dollars are well spent!

    Jeffrey Sinder completed Hazelnut Trail

    11 months ago

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed Cowell-Purisima Trail

    11 months ago

    Note that the southern portion of this country road trail is only open on the weekends and Federal holidays. We started at the southern entrance of the trail by "Bob's" farm stand. As you proceed north toward Cowell Beach (one the best looking beaches in Northern California), you find yourself on a high bluff. To the left (west) you hear the waves breaking on the rocks below. You only have a peek-a-boo view of the ocean and steep cliffs due to the brush and weeds. Be extremely careful if you try to obtain better views of the Pacific as it is long way down if you should slip. To the right (east) of the country road trail is the agricultural side that is bordered by a wire fence. You have peaceful views of beef cattle, rusty vintage farm equipment, pumpkin patches, and the costal crops of Brussels sprouts, and artichokes. You will also walk past large hedges of poison oak. Overhead look for brown pelicans as they seem to fly at eye level due to the updrafts of the cliffs. This mostly level trail of slightly more than six miles round trip provides an adequate work out. You walk on three newly built bridges over steep gullies. The day of our hike (Sunday, October 8, 2017) the trail was lightly traveled, but there were many large events occurring in the Bay Area that weekend. Because you are walking on a high bluff by the ocean be aware that there is a constant breeze here even when the "coast is clear". Excellent signage on the trail concerning Native Americans, farming, wildlife, and history are to be found. At the end of the trail you are rewarded with spectacular views of Cowell Beach. For those with energy one can climb down a wooden staircase to this wide open wonderful beach. The San Mateo coast is breathtaking in its beauty. Maybe we should keep it a secret?

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed Spooner Lake Trail

    12 months ago

    I hiked this trail on 09/19/17 with my wife. The trail is a lovely 2.1 mile round trip "walk" around a beautiful partially man made alpine lake. Scenic beautiful views of both the lake and forest that includes many "weeping" aspen, from the beginning to the end of the hike. Unlike a hike in the deep woods where there is limited sunlight, this trail provides plenty of light as you never venture far from the lakeshore. We were there too early in the autumn season to see much color other than a peek of yellow here and there. Interesting it was snowing a few days later at Spooner Lake. The negatives of this hike is that beside being a short hike it also very level, thus not much of a workout. An earlier review suggested do immediately do the hike again. We did not but it is an excellent suggestion. Another negative is that at certain points on the trail you can hear traffic noise from the nearby highway. I would like to mention on the positive side that the state parks of Nevada (of course including this one) are extremely well maintained. This includes the roadways, parking lots, trails, informative signage, and restrooms. Thank-you Nevada!

    Jeffrey Sinder completed Spooner Lake Trail

    12 months ago

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed Cowell-Purisima Trail

    over 1 year ago

    Jeffrey Sinder completed Cowell-Purisima Trail

    over 1 year ago

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed San Andreas Lake Trail

    over 1 year ago

    Traffic noise. The San Andreas Trail is the northernmost segment of the Crystal Springs Regional Trail. From the start of the trail at San Bruno Avenue to Larkspur Drive the trail is paved and mostly very level. From Larkspur Drive to the end of the San Andreas segment at Hillcrest Boulevard the paved trail turns into a true dirt trail. Hiking boots are needed. This portion makes up 20% of the total San Andreas segment. As you walk south you have the beautiful scenic San Andreas Lake and Sweeney Ridge on your righthand side. To the left you have Route 35 and Highway 280. Traffic noise. You feel somewhat caged in as there are fences on both sides of the trail. The traffic noise can be loud enough at times to drown out conversations with your hiking partner. Sometimes that could be a positive. The main purpose of the trail is aerobic exercise. Yes, there are a few pine trees, ducks, and deer can be sighted at the northern end, but most walkers are thinking of calories being burned. A restroom on the trail is neat and clean and there are benches to sit on as you enjoy your lunch and view the lake. Traffic noise.

    Jeffrey Sinder completed San Andreas Lake Trail

    over 1 year ago

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed Araby Trail

    over 1 year ago

    Best to hike this trail on a cool day...no shade whatsoever. Easy access to the trailhead as it is just off East Palm Canyon Drive. Note we did the hike on 12/12/13. At that time the Bob Hope House was on the market for sometime and finally sold in 2016. Funny, one of the reasons you do the hike is to get a close-up view of the space age flying saucer looking Bob Hope House that once was listed for $50 million, yet at the start of the hike on your left hand side you past a large trailer park. As soon as you can no longer view this interesting trailer park you start the upward incline portion of the hike. The hike provides good exercise but disappointing for those of us who enjoy looking at desert plants. Just gravel, sand, small boulders, no wildlife. As the trail climbs upward the Hope House comes into view as well as a few other homes, one of which was once owned by the late actor Steve McQueen. So you enjoy a view of a home that looks like it belongs in a Jetson's cartoon and five or so beautiful mid-century homes. The trail offers a rocky outcrop that provides a place to rest, eat, drink, and view the rear area of the house. Other than a service road the dead ends at the back of the Hope House there is not much detail to see unless you bring binoculars. This is a junction for other trails or a good place to turn around if you just came to see the Hope House.

    Jeffrey Sinder saved Hellhole Canyon

    over 1 year ago

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed Hellhole Canyon

    over 1 year ago

    Please note that I am writing this review almost one and half years after the hike took place on October 7, 2015. I noticed there was no reviews of this satisfying hike so I decided to post mine. Very easy access to the trail head right off Highway 22. Less than 10 minutes from Christmas Circle and a large dirt parking lot. Be aware that there are several trails leaving from the parking lot. Hellhole Canyon Trail starts level. No switchbacks but a nice mostly level hike through beautiful open desert. You come across three faux grave sites to pound home the point to carry water. The trail was lightly used on this warm October day. I was surprised since there only a few trails in the park that do not require a four wheel drive to get to the trailhead. No litter at all but we did come across a few very old tin cans that had a "historical" look about them. No, we did not come across any mountain lions. As we hiked the trail it lead to a canyon and the open desert slowly
    disappeared. I was informed there would be water dripping down canyon walls. We heard the water dripping but due to the increasing larger boulders and undergrowth that we had to negotiate we decided to stop at the outer edge of the oasis to relax and eat. My favorite all-time hiking partner is an expert at locating Indian grinding mortar holes. She found another one. We will hopefully return in the future and go further.

    Jeffrey Sinder reviewed Hellhole Canyon

    over 1 year ago