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    scenic driving
    13 days ago

    Great drive through Capitol Reef State Park, the Waterpocket Fold is really cool to see with the lines that go between red and white rock layers of golden sandstone, canyons and striking rock formations. Among the cool sights are the Chimney Rock pillar and 3 mile hike, the Hickman Bridge arch, and Capitol Reef, known for its white sandstone domes. Amazing to see Fruita as a real oasis in the desert along with its famous barn and old schoolhouse. Definitely worth a side trip.

    hiking
    23 days ago

    Tried to hike in Clemmons State Educational Forest but discovered it's closed from December 1 to March 1, 2018 for trail maintenance. Skirted quickly over to the Legend Park Trail, which is primarily for mountain bikes with lots of ups and downs and all arounds, but still good for hiking when the bikers aren't using it. During winter there are lots of leaves covering up roots and rocks and not very safe for bikers. That being said, the lower yellow trails are probably the easiest for biking with gentle slopes and flat boardwalks. Going to the upper trails, I would think Little Big Horn is the most fun as it has the smoothest runs and big sweeping turns with some big hills. Magnolias is for intermediates but uneventful. Larry's Loop is a challenging spur off of Little Big Horn. Nearest the entrance is Hucksville with some really extreme technical ramps suitable for flips, some huge jumps and a really cool banked track - for experts. I enjoyed the four miles around all the trails - it was a good workout with lots of variety. For biking it has something for everyone. Also great for trail running.

    walking
    24 days ago

    Had to park at a construction site to access the Greenway. Better access from North Cary Park. Paved walk with some ups and downs through woods between businesses and Weston neighborhoods. Also has an access trail maybe with some parking about a half mile in.

    hiking
    1 month ago

    Flat paved trail beside Lake Louise, this is awe inspiring. It was cloudy over the snowy peaks at the end of the trail and the clouds muted the light for a great shot. The picture of the Chateau from the far end is framed nicely by the surrounding mountains. Go past the lake for more adventure.

    hiking
    1 month ago

    A short stroll to a spectacular view, not to miss if you travel along the Icefield Parkway!
    Peyto Lake (pea-toe) is a glacier-fed lake located in Banff National Park. The lake was named for Bill Peyto, an early trail guide and trapper in the Banff area. The lake is formed in a valley of the Waputik Range, between Caldron Peak, Peyto Peak and Mount Jimmy Simpson, at an elevation of 1,860 m (6,100 ft). During the summer, significant amounts of glacial rock flour flow into the lake, and these suspended rock particles give the lake a bright, turquoise color. The lake is best seen from Bow Summit, the highest point on the Icefield Parkway.

    hiking
    1 month ago

    Nice flat 4 mile RT trail along the Eno between West Point on the Eno and 4404 Guess Road [at the bridge]. The Eagle trail parallels the MST near Guess Road; you don't miss much if you use the MST instead, as the MST tracks right beside the Eno and is more interesting. This is great for trail running and a nice stroll along the river.

    Not much of a trail, you can pick up an interpretative map at the trailhead for some points of interest. Seemed like some of the trail markers were missing. The most interesting features were the West Point Mill and the inside; ask one of the docents/guides about it.

    Starting at West Point on the Eno, this trail starts at the bottom of the hill from the parking lot just past the bridge to the right of the picnic area. Note the trail is not well marked and some additional signage would help, but the trail has a white blaze until you make the short water crossing and take an immediate left where it becomes a red blaze to Sennett Hole. I was hoping for a longer hike and passed Sennett Hole - apparently not a bad fishing spot with bass and lots of bluegill. I started up the hill from the hole and found out it goes to a nearby neighborhood. On the way back I went to the end of the point along the sewer line, then backtracked to the same point I first made the water crossing and took a left on the South River Trail. All of the trails on this side of the Eno are short. Nothing to write home about.

    Awesome hike, it's about 8.2 miles and 1850' elevation gain. The trailhead is down the Dillard Road Hwy 106 from Highlands and you take a left on Hale Ridge Road which makes a few turns - the AllTrails app gets you right to the trailhead. From the dirt part of the road you will find the signage for the Bartram Trail. Make sure you head south into Georgia (downhill from the road). The trail starts out with some gradual rolling ups and downs across several small creeks, one with a nice waterfall. Then you gradually start climbing - stay on the yellow blazed Bartram Trail. After several switchbacks along a steeper grade, you'll come to the top. This is a fantastic workout and you can trail run it - very easy to do on the way down. I gave it four stars because the top is not a true bald as it is covered with scrub oaks. The best view is atop the fire tower with the true 360 degree view. Definitely worth a trip from Highlands if you are looking for a moderate to difficult hike or overnight camping at the top. Enjoy!

    We took the AT from Blackrock Summit parking area to the left on the Rockytop Trail and then another left toward Austin Mountain as we were doing the complete ridge loop down to the fire road and back up Furnace Mountain. The Rockytop portion of the trail [and Lewis Mountain "may" be a bit better] was nice walk in the woods at first and then we went along the left ridge through the rockpiles, which are pretty cool, and then down to the fire road. Views are ok, and rockpiles are a neat feature to pick your way through, but there are better trails nearby with more bang for your effort.

    hiking
    3 months ago

    After Red Rock Point (highly recommended!) getting us closest to the lower falls on the north rim, the Brink of the Lower Falls trail was closed for repair, so we went on the Brink of the Upper Falls trail (the river is extremely powerful and wild diving over the upper cliffs), onto the South Rim road, taking the trails to Artist Point (beautiful palette of reds, whites and yellows in the sunlight, one of most famous views in park) and Uncle Tom’s trail to the lower falls. Great combination of stops.

    scenic driving
    3 months ago

    We drove to the Great Fountain Geyser on Firehole Lake Drive, which had just finished erupting and was spewing some steam and water about 20 feet as it finished its cycle. We spoke with a geyser expert, as she was knitting while timing the eruption and taking notes, one of several geyser watchers we saw on our journey. She had the Washington license plate “GEYSER." We also saw White Dome and Pink Dome Geysers along Firehole Lake Drive and drove through a seeping hydrothermal area surrounding Firehole Lake that looked pretty treacherous. The one-way drive came out at the Fountain Paint Pots of the Lower Geyser Basin. Don't miss this drive.

    Easy paved walk down to the top of Upper Yosemite Falls, you can watch the water shoot by and over. You get a better view looking up to the falls from downstream on some of the other trails, but the sheer water volume is impressive. Our visit was during chilly, overcast weather, but still enjoyed the roaring torrents. Worth a stop.

    hiking
    3 months ago

    Part of the Lower Geyser Basin, Fountain Paint Pots across from Firehole Lake Drive offers a variety of geothermal features and is worth the visit.

    hiking
    3 months ago

    Short mud pot trail, there are much better areas to view geothermal activities. 3.8 miles/6 km south of Norris Junction, the lower portion of this colorful hydrothermal area is wheelchair-accessible. The upper trail to the mudpots is steep and rough, and not recommended for visitors using wheelchairs. Fountain Paintpots is a better viewing area.

    From the north end of Jackson Lake, we approached Yellowstone on the Roosevelt Hwy through Bridger Teton National Forest, a big lodgepole pine forest, with many trees hit by fires appearing like giant toothpicks. We arrived at the south gate to Yellowstone just as (on the first day of summer, mind you) it began to SNOW! We passed by Lewis Canyon and Lewis Falls in the snowstorm, but couldn’t halfway see it and deemed it as a must-stop on our return visit (we also missed Moose Falls and the Dime Creek pullout). Finally, the snow eased off and we arrived at the Lewis Lake area, which was beautiful as the sun glistened on the snow-covered lodgepoles. Our first crossing of the Continental Divide at 7988 feet was quite interesting and exciting with the changing topology and weather. We reached West Thumb Geyser Basin (turning out to be one of our favorites) ahead of the snowstorm. On our return trip we had great weather and made a stop at Lewis Falls. Great drive, and GTNP and YNP make a great combination sight-seeing adventure.

    A much easier way to the top of Old Rag, this is a gradual climb up a fire road from the junction at the old Old Rag parking area. Not as fun but still gets you there to some absolutely spectacular views. There are switchbacks to get you to the top as the elevation change is the same, just over a much longer and flatter ascent.

    hiking
    3 months ago

    Awesome hike/climb! Spectacular views. We shared the trail with the Army's Hotel Company - great bunch of guys. While the trail is crowded, there are plenty of opportunities to find a great view and plenty of picnic spots. This is a hard trail, similar to Grandfather's Profile and Ridge trails, as well as Mt. Katahdin's Hunt trail at the end [or beginning] of the AT in Maine. We thoroughly enjoyed the challenge and the views kept on coming. There are plenty of climb ups, unders, throughs and overs to make it a great obstacle course. It's like a jungle gym for adults, and there were plenty of kids along the trail too. There are some dangerous spots to be careful around and we spotted a copperhead on the trail just as we were reaching the summit. We enjoyed watching the ravens perform aerial acrobatics from the summit and chilled with a snack taking in all of God's beauty. Not to miss if you are up for it!

    hiking
    3 months ago

    We did this as part of a loop circuit starting at the Blackrock Summit parking area, down the AT, left around the ridge through the rock slides and down to Browns Gap fire road. From there after the creek crossing the Furnace Mtn. Trail is a long 1100' mile and a half constant uphill to a left turn that takes you another 200' elevation gain in a half mile to a tight overlook at the top of Furnace Mountain. The spot fills up at lunchtime on the weekends as it is a good picnic destination with a great 120 degree view [trees on both sides]. While we enjoyed this part of the hike, the Blackrock Summit was much more spectacular and gives you much more bang for your effort. Still, it's less crowded than Blackrock and gives you a great workout.

    Also known as the Jack Albright Loop, we started at the Humpback Rocks parking area, and after climbing up to the rocks, took the AT down to Glass Hollow overlook for a short snack and a nice view, then continued on the AT to the left turn on the Jack Albright trail over Dobie Mountain, which is wooded with no exposures. Nice hike and discovered the plane crash from the 1960s - you can't miss the mangled sheet aluminum cabin and motor housing. Several folks were out enjoying the great weather.

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