Join the largest community of outdoor enthusiasts.

Get Started
  • Stats
  • Activity
  • Completed
  • Recordings
  • Lists
  • Reviews
  • Photos
  • Profile
  • Recent Activity

    B.J. Allen reviewed Copperfield Nature Trail

    5 months ago

    Very good trail to hike, run or bike. Some elevation changes but nothing drastic. It's mostly dirt with some rocks, and a lot of it's shaded.

    B.J. Allen completed Copperfield Nature Trail

    5 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Walnut Creek Trail

    5 months ago

    Parked at the tennis courts, rode my bike. Its a descent workout on a bike. Nothing super steep, one long elevation change (just south of the tennis courts). It's all paved and well maintained. There are a few sharp turns and intersections, so be wary of going too fast on a bike.

    B.J. Allen completed Walnut Creek Trail

    5 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Mount Lakeway Trail

    5 months ago

    My wife and I hiked this. Shes not near as used to hiking as I am, so we had to stop several times for her to catch her breath, as there are some steady inclines.

    B.J. Allen completed Mount Lakeway Trail

    5 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Good Water Trail

    7 months ago

    I only hiked down to about Walnut Spring Park, but boy was it gorgeous! Nice views of the lake (more like a river here) river at first, then after a short bout of woods (with a small water crossing) and the open fields, you get another nice view of the lake. After this is hiking in the woods for awhile, but you get glimpses of the lake at a distance, cool looking vegetation.

    Once at Walnut Spring park, you can actually hike down to the edge of the lake. And here, it's just utterly beautiful- a least in the Summer when I hiked it, I wonder if it holds it's beauty during the Winter.

    I'll definitely be back soon, to try and hike all the way to Russel Park.

    B.J. Allen completed Good Water Trail

    7 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Nature Loop

    7 months ago

    This trail is really a network of trails, in a park with playgrounds, some pavilions, a splashpad, a nice house to host events in, a river a the back and horses. It has nice restrooms, but kinda few and far between. Water fountains and trash cans and benches. But all that stuff are at the two main areas. When on the trail, you're on your own (though the trial never goes too terribly far back).

    The trails themselves are either hiking only, or else hiking and horseback riding. No bikes at all. And they all have crushed rock and/or woodchips on them, so no rocky and rooty and watching your step. here are some hills, but nothing too bad. And the trials aren't very "tangley". Saw deer several times, and some squirrels.

    The park looks brand new, and no one told me that you had to pay $10 ($5 for Georgetown residents). Even though all the construction going (on the westside of the park, near the playground area) on will eventually end up making the place look nice, it's not worth a $10 revisit.

    B.J. Allen completed Meadow Trail Loop

    7 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Lake Austin/360 Bridge Overlook

    7 months ago

    Parking is easy to spot, on the north-west side of the road, just north of the bridge. There are no restrooms, benches, water fountains, etc but there is a garbage can which, well, is usually very full and thus not collecting all the trash. But as for the trail itself-

    Immediately you climb lots of feet- really steep, high steps, slick rocks, loose rocks to slip on, etc. But this somewhat treacherous climb must be worth it, because lots and lots of people come here everyday. You'll see people in wedding dresses, formal attire, graduation gowns, etc. with photographers in tow, some with rather expensive looking equipment, because the view is spectacular.

    But then you hit the fence. After the climb, you see the view. After the view, go west and you'll shortly come to a fence that's cut. Well, supposedly, it's not private property, you're not trespassing, etc. when you go through this fence. There are signs elsewhere saying "no trespassing" but here, well, I guess the gate people didn't want to climb or something. After the gate, the trail goes for a ways. Plenty of scenic views; some trails to the north that go into the forest, but quickly hit the no trespassing fence; and plenty of trails to the south but, of course, they're on the edge of the cliff overlooking the river, so they're rather precarious. Looking for some scrambling or some danger? Try and hike/climb down to the river without sliding. Have kids, or just want a nice hike? Stay on the main trail, and all should be well until about the last quarter mile, where it gets a bit "woods", the trail is a little hard to see, but the loop at the end is short and you're headed back to the bridge.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Wild Basin Trail

    7 months ago

    Hiked all the trails forwards and backwards. As always, this trail system delivers the "outdoors hiking" goods.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Riverplace Nature Trail

    7 months ago

    I went hiking in the morning elsewhere, then after about 1 and-a-half hours of a "break" (drove to my church, fixed sandwiches to give to hungry people, then drove here), I decided, "I can hike another trail". Needless to say, after hours of hiking in the morning, then tackling this and (and Little Fern), I was bushed on Tues. But still, this is an awesome hike.

    ! ! !
    And I totally second John Odette below! ! !
    ! ! !

    B.J. Allen reviewed Little Fern Trail at Riverplace

    7 months ago

    Another hike on this pretty trail.

    I went hiking in the morning elsewhere, then after about 1 and-a-half hours of a "break" (drove to my church, fixed sandwiches to give to hungry people, then drove here), I decided, "I can hike another trail". Needless to say, after hours of hiking in the morning, then tackling this and the River Place trail, I was bushed on Tues.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Trailhead Park Loop

    7 months ago

    Hit this trail again, hiking this time. It was really, really muddy at the bottom by the creek, but the rest was solid. There are just enough major forks in this trail system to give you a sense of exploration and adventure, but nothing so bad that you'll get lost, because every major fork leads you back to the neighborhood.

    No water fountains, rest rooms, doggy-bag stations, etc. (Wait- one doggy bag station that i saw, at the Boulder Ln trail head, hidden by all the decorative bushes) I think there's one bench near the beginning of the trail, and that's it. But don't let this deter you, it's a fun trail, and hey, it's like, 99% shaded.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Trailhead Park Trail

    7 months ago

    Hit this trail again, hiking this time. It was really, really muddy at the bottom by the creek, but the rest was solid. There are just enough major forks in this trail system to give you a sense of exploration and adventure, but nothing so bad that you'll get lost, because every major fork leads you back to the neighborhood.

    No water fountains, rest rooms, doggy-bag stations, etc. I think there's one bench near the beginning of the trail, and that's it. But don't let this deter you, it's a fun trail, and hey, it's like, 99% shaded.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Crockett Gardens Falls

    8 months ago

    Th trail itself is a mixture of about 20% grassy, the rest of it is rather rocky. Some smaller rocks, some larger, none so big you gotta scramble though. When you finally get close to Crockett gardens, you hit mostly grass. It's a rather fun trail, with numerous beautiful scenic views of the lake. But...

    _ _ _
    I wanted a challenge, so I "re-coned" on Monday, going down all the trails towards the lake. The next day I brought my gps, took coordinates down each trail that met up with the lake. Then at Crockett Gardens, instead of going back down the trail, I walked along the shoreline (to the east, back towards Cedar breaks). VERY rocky: loose rocks everywhere, and some scratchy bushes and driftwood. I had to scramble a little bit, following the shoreline. One spot, an inlet, had me climbing over huge, pointy, cracking, dead, bear tree branches- had to really balance and watch my step and test the strength of the branches under my feet, lest I slip and be impaled by said said branches before possibly hitting jagged rocks beneath. Some spots got me very close to the water, and some loose rocks almost caused me to slide right into the lake. At some points I could've jumped into the Lake and swam around the rock outcropping, but I had my smartphones with me and they're not waterproof. So first I had to do some major scrambling through some bushes, getting all scratched up. But then the next point was "the point of no return"- very steep, slick, and wet. I decided at that point to turn back, find on of the trails leading back to the main trail (thanks to my gps) and tracking around the rock outcropping. I went back down to the lake after the slippery rock outcropping, and the shoreline on that side was not precarious, but rather serene. A nice, peaceful walk (still gotta watch your footing, as it's 99% loose rocks) back to my second GPS point, a few minutes searching for the trail, and I was headed back to my car.

    Many boats and jet skies where on the lake, and even a guy in a small kayak fishing, came into the inlet while was trying to avoid falling to the branches and rocks. It was cool to feel as though I was "sharing the trail" with people where where not hiking.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Brushy Creek Trail from Brushy Creek Lake Park

    8 months ago

    So I started at Brushy Creek Sports Complex, and instead going west on the trail itself, on the south side of the creek, I went west on the north side of the creek. There's not really a trail there, it's just fun to walk through the more "wild" parts. Eventually you gotta cross or wade down the creek. I hit some cool rocky spots, and one spot with lot of huge tree limbs that was fun to climb over. Eventually I met up with "picnic".

    B.J. Allen reviewed Brushy Creek Regional Trail

    10 months ago

    Ran from mile marker 5.25 to about mile marker 2.5, but I took the off-trail trails. Just past the huge sports fields, to the south at the bridge is a trail into the woods, comes out at another bridge at Champions Park. But then at that bridge, there are more trails to the west, some elevation changes and plenty of twists and turns, and rocky and rooty. Then I ran the main trail to Brushy Creek lake Park, where right before the three way intersection and bridge, there's a trail to the north. It's totally for biking, but runners use it too and it's all cool; it's very twisty and turny, and some rocks.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Upper Shoal Creek Trail

    11 months ago

    So I actually parked at the Randalls between 35th and 38th St. So I have no idea where you could park at 29th St. The trail goes through a few parks which have rest rooms, benches, playgrounds, etc. And there are doggie poop-bag stations all along the trail. But as for the trail itself-

    The trail goes from concrete to gravel to cracked asphalt to gravel back to concrete (not in that order). You're mostly surrounded by trees, a hillside, lots of grass, and of course Shoal Creek itself (which today was very, very low on the water level). There's a creek crossing, but there's also a smooth, new concrete path next to the creek crossing, in case you don't want to trapse across the rocks. There are several forks in the trail, most of them take you to roads, but some are just at parks where the trail circles the park.

    At Pease Park, there is a fork in the trail, and if you take the fork onto the trail with all the wood chips, you get into some actual woods (though still you're in the city and it's noticeable), the trail has a few swithbacks, the trail gains some pretty good elevation and there are several forks, etc. It's like they took trail system from a big wilderness park, and shrunk it down to about an acre.

    After Pease Park (if memory serves, today was my first time running this trail) you get into a more noticeable city environment, and you get right next to the creek but on a raised concrete trail. There are several road-bridges you go under with homeless people and graffiti (in open daylight it's completely safe). Around 5th St, the trail is barricaded, as they are working on the trail in that section, making is look new and swanky. That section was fun to me, though, because I had to search for stairs, a way across, ran across some bridges, etc A miniature city adventure.

    The trail had plenty of people, but nothing too bad. I could see on a holiday it being very crowded. There where bike riders and dogs on and off leash, other runners, etc. All in all, for a typical city trail, it was pretty good.

    B.J. Allen completed Shoal Creek Trail

    11 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Lake Pflugerville Trail

    11 months ago

    Ran here again yesterday. Very, very pretty. Guys fishing, people walking and jogging. Just a place for a leisurely stroll. This is not for hardcore trail running, it's to get some flat miles in.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Bull Creek Greenbelt Trail

    11 months ago

    I wasn't aware to day was a holiday. There where a lot of people out there today! It's kinda cool to be running and jumping and ducking along the rocks and trees, and people look at you like you're nuts.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Lost Trail

    11 months ago

    I wasn't aware that it was a holiday today. But upon running (no pun intended) into a lot of people along the way on the trail, including a family from my church, I soon figured out something was going on. It was a good run.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Bull Creek Trail

    11 months ago

    First time running this whole loop without stopping to walk or take a break. Sweet!

    B.J. Allen reviewed Wild Basin Trail

    11 months ago

    Parking is usually pretty full, but since it was like 99% humidity and 45 degrees, I actually got there and had my pick. Ran all the trails a few times, just had to be careful not to slip.

    I think the thing I like the best about this place is the variety: Waterfall (though not always gushing) into a small lake, the rock formations, the sparse trees up top and more dense vegetation at the bottom, the overlooks are all rather cool, and plenty of creek crossings.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Brushy Creek Regional Trail

    11 months ago

    Ran the entire trail in the cold and wet. It was just under 40 degrees, got awful wet due to two shirts (one short sleeved, one long) and all the humidity, but it was a pleasant run.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Northern Walnut Creek Trail

    11 months ago

    So yesterday I decided to take all the offshoot trails. This wide, mostly flat, concrete trail through woods, parks, and a little neighbohood has all sorts of trails in Walnut Creek park, but then when you get past Gracey Woods, there are only a few offshoot trails.

    All the trails I took are to the south of the trail except one. The one trial to the north, just before you hit the park-n-ride, was rather short and led me to some tents (probably a homeless camp). The trails to the south, though:

    The first two or three trail climb almost straight up, and end rather quickly at an apt complex. Good for a short, steep, sorta scrambley hill climbs. The third or fourth trail, though, took me further back into the woods, still gaining some good elevation. The trial forked a few times, the trails either dead ending in the woods or at the apt complex. But stay to the west and this trail does run by the creek, high above it. Back to the main trail, the next few trails after this one leads into some sparse trees, some of the trails are short, the one with the "no motorized vehicle" sign looped back to the main trail; and the final trail was comparatively longer, ran along side the creek with some neat rocks formations, and went across the creek- but when I got to a fork and heard some loud banging, I decided to turn around.
    Then you get to the trail going north, which winds through the woods a very brief way, hits a clearing, and you spot the tents.

    I'm sure there are more trails back there, none maintained by the city or the parks&recreation people most likely. But if you want to mix it up a little, these trials give you a break from the down-and-back concrete trail.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Bull Creek Trail

    12 months ago

    Ran this plus the Valburn trails, got 2 hours and ten+ miles in! This definitely has good elevation gains but also some flats, many step-ups but also some level elevation gain, lots and lots of dense brush but also some open spots, etc. Everything except a creek crossings.

    This trail has signs but you could still get a little turned around near the beginning of the trail. All signs and the info kisoks says no horses, bikes, dogs- this is just for feet.

    B.J. Allen reviewed San Gabriel River Trail

    12 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed San Gabriel Trail

    12 months ago

    This is a good trail to run for trail runners, when you want a break from sharp rocks, long switchbacks, tree limbs to the face, steep hills, etc. Run next to the concrete parts of the trail (on the grass) when possible to still get the "trail" under your feet.

    The two times I've run this trail I've seen relatively few people, mostly hikers and moms with strollers, and I don't think I've seen any dogs- except for the loop in the San Gabriel park, there are almost always a good variety of people on that trail. The scenery is nice, mostly trees and bushes and some rocks, scrub and oak-forest looking- but when you get past the section along the road the scenery is especially pleasant for about a mile.

    From Booty's Road Park, you can easily get to Lake Georgetown.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Walnut Creek Park Loop

    12 months ago

    B.J. Allen completed Walnut Creek Metro Loop

    12 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Walnut Creek Metro Loop

    12 months ago

    I ran a lot of this today. I tried following all the signs with the blue dot. But at many intersections, the sign either has no blue dot, or there's no sign at all. I ended up running around 7.5 miles, instead of 9.6, and ended up backtracking on accident. So it'd be good if they updated the signs.

    But as for trail running in general, the only thing lacking in Walnut Creek Metro Park are any long, more steep hills. There is much elevation changes, and some steep hills, but none that are very long. But really, this is no deal breaker at all. These trails are way cool.

    A lot of the loops in this park have names. To help out, this trail consists of: Windy loop, BMX loop, Severe Consequences loop, .6 loop, and others. I think you'd cross the creek at least twice. Watch out for bikers, always give them the right-of-way. They are supposed to yield to pedestrians- this is proper etiquette. But a bike zooming down a hill more than twice as fast as you, then suddenly they come around a corner and you're five feet from them- it's easier for a pedestrian to get out of the way than for that biker to stop on a dime.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Commons Ford Waterfall Trail

    12 months ago

    Once you find the park itself, there are a few small rock parking lots, but if you drive further into the park you can park along side the road- just mind the no parking signs. The trail heads are easy to find, as most are not very hidden, and some do have (slightly visible) signs, and I think anywhere you see parking there's a trail head.

    The main section of the trail on the north side of the road has a few benches and a few nature-info signs. But directional/trail name signage is completely void. The trails are rather easy to follow, very wide in most places. There are nice views of the river, and some historic buildings- and even a functioning, outhouse-looking restroom. There are a few trails that go into thicker woods, wind a little, rocky and such, but for the most part: If you want a nice leisurely stroll- see some birds, say hi to other hikers/runners, this side is good for that. Also this side is for biking, because...

    On the south side of the street, the only signs I saw where "no bikes", at one or two trail heads; and the signs on the barbedwire fence saying "no tresspassing; private property" and stuff like that. This side is for the rockin' and rollin'! Very rocky trails, some scramble parts, large rocks and tree branches and pokey-bushes to contend with. The streams crossings on this side don't have bridges (there's an unspectacular bridge on the north side), the trails aren't very wide. You want that "wilderness" or "rugged" feel, this side is for you. There are lots of intersecting trails, and some that go to nowhere or just disappear into the thick woods/large rocks. But for the most part, follow the path here on All Trails and you'll nto get turned around. But even if you do get turned around, it's a rather small space and pretty much impossible to really get lost, because you got roads on two side and barbed wire fences on two sides, and the main trail/s are pretty noticable- though again, no signage back here period (or benches, restrooms, etc.).

    And about that waterfall- either I didn't find it; or else the rather small waterfall I did find doesn't live up to the descriptions given here and on other park/trails websites. Maybe I just need to come after a good rain. All in all, this place has it all- wide easy trails, serene scenery, nature, skinny rugged trails, hill climbs, creek crossings, benches, river views, etc. I did get in ten miles of running, but only after running all the trails at least twice.

    B.J. Allen completed Commons Ford Waterfall Trail

    12 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Upper Bull Creek Greenbelt Trail

    12 months ago

    For parking, just park at the main St Edward's lot. Whether coming from the north or the south on Spicewoods Springs Rd, it sneaks up quick, on the west. Once parked, there are three trail heads, one on the southern end of the small lot, one on the northern end, and one in the middle.To get to this particular trail, you can take any trail head, and just keep going west at trail intersections (whether you go through the thicker trees on the north most trail head, or you find the more open fields and trees on the two other trail heads). Once you get right alongside the creek, head north.

    This trail is like others at St Edward's park: wide at some parts and skinny at others, dirt and rocks and roots, twisty, access to the creek. But unlike the trails to the west of the creek, this is not any kind of elevation change.

    You can run along the creek shore for some of the trail, but most of it will be more away from the creek shore. But don't let that deter you- there are several small trails which lead through the trees and vegetation to the west, down to the creek. Eventually you'll get onto a skinny, skinny trail not on the creek, and eventually you'll intersect with a road. if the trail goes past there I don;t know... Hmmm... maybe I should go find out just how long this trail goes north!

    B.J. Allen reviewed Northern Walnut Creek Trail

    12 months ago

    Concrete trail through mostly woods, starting in the Walnut Creek Metropolitan Park. Trail head is easy to locate- turn into the south/west parking lots (there's one road through the park). Going west through the parking lots, it's hard to miss the large, open area with a highly visible concrete trail and steel handrails, on the west.

    The trail is entirely concrete, except the three or four large, flat wooden bridges. The trail is rather wide with a yellow stripe in the middle. No large hill climbs, no scrambling, no twisty-turny, up-and-down stuff, no rocks and roots, etc. Just a regular concrete trail, but the scenery is very pretty. Lots of walkers, bikers, joggers here, plus dogs and strollers and kids too. Strangely enough, there are only benches and such at the trail head, then about a mile down a Gracy Woods park. But that's it.

    The cool part about this trail is that the Walnut Creek Park itself has a lot of hiking and biking trails, with all the ups-and-downs, twists and turns, etc. the real "hiking in the woods" experience. So you can go down this concrete trail as kind of a landmark, and take any one of the numerous sidetrails into the woods. Most trails eventually loop back to the concrete trail, but not immediately- one turn and you could go deeper into the tangle of trails away from the main trail, so be careful if you wanna stick close to the main trail.

    All in all, there's enough variation- plain old woods, some large wooden bridges, the creek, open grassy areas, play ground, train tracks and streets overhead, , etc for this trail to be not too boring.

    B.J. Allen completed Northern Walnut Creek Trail

    12 months ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Brushy Creek Mountain Bike Loop Trail

    about 1 year ago

    Some new updates-

    The stuffed snake I mentioned in my last review is no longer there. In fact, almost none of the sill trinkets, toys- there was even a cow skull- are no longer there.

    What is now there are various trail signs. Not very many, but at various forks there are signs, and at the one skinny wooden bridge (bridge? it's about 6 inches wide and five feet long, over a small water area) warning of the bridge. There's one sign with an arrow pointing straight, and looking to the right I noticed a trail- guess they don't want us using that one, I think it meets back up with the main trail almost immediately. There are also a few signs that say "EMS access". That's good- a biker, runner, hiker injures themselves, and there's some EMS access points to make rescue a little quicker and easier. And lastly, a few markers at forks showing either "trailhead" or another part of the trail. The markers do make it feel less intimidating to first time runners/hikers/bikers.

    The end of the trail has a marker that simply says "END". Go north on the service road and you'll get to the Regional trail. Go south and you'll eventually get to the neighborhood. But towards the west there are more trail heads. I'm guessing these'll be marked soon, as there are already some signs on them, and they are used frequently.

    The trail was mostly dry, saw one spot of water in some shade that was still icy (it's been cold down here, it was 35 degrees [fahrenheit] when I was running), but no mud anywhere. Saw another runner, some bikers, and some hikers. All in all, this trail is quiet possibly my favorite in the Austin area (I really like the Bull Creek&Valburn area, but as for a single trail this one is good).

    And oh, the way you get the whole 7.2 is by parking over at the Brushy Creek Sports Park, running the Regional Trail to the trailhead, then the trail itself (Deception/Top Notch), then running the Regional Trail all the way back to your car. But the actual Deception/Top Notch trail by itself is about 5 1/2 miles.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Dominion at Great Hills Trail

    about 1 year ago

    Seeing I had only run around 3 miles with the blue, red, and bike trail, I looked at the map located at the trailhead, and noticed that if the map is correct (which it is), I can go east just after the beginning of the blue trail going north and get more mileage.

    This was really good. Lots of ups and downs, some pretty technical. Lots of changes in scenery, too. In one spot, there's a small grassy clearing that has a fire ring, picnic table, and a sign with arrows painted "Huntsville, TX 162 miles" "Sand Diego, 1,000 [something] miles", "Norway, 5006 miles". It was kinda neat. And there where plenty of switchbacks. Basically you go east for awhile, and you'll be going down down down. You'll finally notice you're climbing, and that's when the more regular switchbacks begin. If you want a good hill climb here, you'll pass the powerline road several times.

    The trail back here is hard to see at times, sometimes it seems to go away all together, and there's very limited signage. But really, there's roads all around you from the neighborhood so it'd be hard to get lost. After a year of constant trail running on several different trails, I've learned to navigate these hard to see trails. So if you're new to all this or don't do it very often, you might find yourself frustrated.

    B.J. Allen reviewed Brushy Creek Trail

    about 1 year ago

    Parking is easy: The Play for All Park has tons of spaces. Finding the trail is easy: It's completely visible from the Play for All Park parking lot. There are restrooms, benches, playgrounds and water fountains at this end of the trail, and along the trail you'll find more benches, and eventually more restrooms, water fountains, playgrounds. This trail has no signs to my knowledge, but it's all one single wide concrete trail that's impossible to get lost on.

    The trail is all concrete, except the few short bridges you cross. It is all within grass and/or trees, except the one time you run along the road (on Kenney Fort Blvd). The map here shows the trail ending at Kenney Fort Blvd, but really there is something like 4 more miles of trail if you go south on Kenney Fort Blvd, then turn east. It's all very pretty, very relaxing, and there are usually other people strolling along peacefully. For trail running, well, it's not trail running. But for walking, hiking, or just jogging/running, it's great. And oh yeah, sometimes people have their dogs off leash but usually not.

    B.J. Allen completed Brushy Creek Trail

    about 1 year ago

    B.J. Allen reviewed Skip's Trail

    about 1 year ago

    As usual, got a good workout and discovered new trails, new ways to run around and have fun. These Valburn and Bull Creek trails make for almost endless exploration and varying terrain.