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hiking
2 days ago

I'm not a fan of fire road "trails," but at least there was room for my friend and me to walk side by side. This Mineral Wells trail is the closest to the one we actually did. We started at Fern Canyon, then turned west at 5 Points to Vista Viewpoint. We followed the road around Bee Rock, then took a side trail through the Old Zoo and back to the parking lot. No coverage, so it was hot--keep that in mind. I gave five stars, because it was a good workout, nice views and I love Griffith Park. Next time, I'll record.

hiking
15 days ago

It took me 4.5 hours to make it to the top of Mt. Baldy and 3.5 to make it back down to the Visitor Center (where I parked). I left my car around 5 am. Don't forget your Adventure Pass. Finding the trailhead in the dark was difficult. My all trails app wasn't working without signal for some reason. I thought I'm supposed to be able to view the map without service? Anyway, I followed Bear Canyon Rd. (paved) up past all of the homes and finally found the trailhead. Just FYI, it's about half a mile up the road. Starting out, the weather was very pleasant. I didn't have to worry about the heat on the way up. The views are magnificent, especially while the moon is still out and the sun is just starting to rise. The weather at the top was very comfortable. I didn't have to whip out a long sleeve or my hat and gloves. I used this hike to train for Mt. Whitney. If Mt Whitney is similar to this hike, I'm in good shape! I thought it was tough but not so much that I ever questioned my abilities or even desire to hike it in the first place. At times, I was hiking on the balls of my feet, so it's pretty steep in sections. I definitely recommend hiking poles for the way down.

This was a fun hike. Extremely difficult. keep hydrated and bring sunblock especially if you're doing it in April. make sure you have the right hiking shoes or boots and always keep hydrated

They weren't kidding. This is a serious trail. I couldn't get there at 0100 because I had to work Friday and I'm in 29 Palms. I hit the trailhead at 0300, temperature was 91 in Palm Springs. This trail is tough to follow in the dark, and there are some very dangerous drop-offs and narrow ledges. I highly recommend downloading the trail through the Pro version and following the GPS. I could have saved myself some wasted time and energy.

The first couple of miles and the last 3 before you reach the tramway are very steep. there are some portions before the tram that were legit 40% inclines. I was down on all fours many times.

I didn't manage to finish. Reaching the tramway was all I had. I took 4 liters of water and a liter of Body Armor and it barely lasted me to the Ranger Station. I wish I could have started at 0100, it might have let me get to SJ Mountain. As it was, I was proud of the effort.

I only saw 2 other people on the trail. You have to be a bit nuts to try this one in July, I guess.

backpacking
1 month ago

Absolutely amazing experience. Standard Avalanche Gulch route, rather late in the 2018 season (July 6th-7th). In retrospect, worth doing earlier for more snow on the approach, which was instead a lot of scree.

Additional reason for doing earlier is the hazardous rock fall danger. In fact, rock traveling ‘warp-speed’ split my roommate and I (we were no more than 10’ apart) on the gulch ascent (3am start) from Helen Lake to the Red Banks. Made for an extremely unnerving remaining ~1k’ up past the Heart. Apparently better to get later start (~4am) this late in the season re: rock fall + wind.

After the Red Banks (steep) chimney, and magical sunrise Shasta shadow to the south, Misery Hill was indeed a slog, all scree at this point.

Final push on summit plateau was inspiring, only ~250’ of elevation remaining to the summit. *Make sure to get updated forecast (storms/wind) and worth bringing an anemometer, as we were surprised with near 50 mph winds while summiting (8:15am). Ideally less than ~40mph at the top, as we barely felt comfortable getting to the register.

All in all, an incredible introduction to mountaineering. We went unguided after much research and planning, but benefited from linking up with 2 other small groups. Fun Glissade on the way down. Total RT time from Helen up and back was ~8 hours, but included some leisurely breaks. Crampons and axe almost certainly required.

While others are a priority now, definitely would revisit Shasta in the future, potentially on more technical routes with some more experience. 9/10, only due to rockfall moment and the scree.

Amazing and brutal. I recommend starting at 1:00am.

Great hike! Took a little over 2 hours to get up and a little over 1 hour to get down. If you hit the trail early enough, a good chunk of the way up will be in shade. Time of year will determine exactly when that time frame is, but I had cover starting at 7:30am in June. The last 1/3 of the way up is very steep and you might feel like you are on a StairMaster at times, but it is extremely rewarding in the end. The view from the top is incredible. The peak itself, however, is a little underwhelming. Not many exposed rocks to take a seat on and a ton of insects that won't make you want to stay long/touch the log box at the top. Be sure to bring at least 2 liters of water as well for a hotter day. Went through most of my water on the way up and only stopped drinking to ration the rest for the way down.

Nice little training hike. beginning of the hike has about 1/4 mile of shade but after that, it's HOT! Bring a hat, sunscreen and plenty of water. Good Mellow hike right up until the last mile and it get's a bit scrambley with a couple false summits. Watch out for the Yucca and Bramble, there's lot of it up there. Great views and a little log box at the top.

I almost died.
don't do this hike on 3 hours sleep.
I think most people can do this. there is no real steep part, it just zigzags a lot. it's really long though so make sure you can handle walking for 12 hours.

That "hard" difficulty rating wasn't kidding. The trail begins simple enough. Not a big deal. Eventually however, we begin to climb up a mountain with little to no switchbacks. Just straight up. This hike is definitely not boring. As another poster mentioned, it's with the effort.

Climbed yesterday ... It looks like 2 day climbs are popular on weekends (camp on Saturday, summit on Sunday) but a lot of people who summited on Saturday chose a one day option.

As opposed to regular hiking, this route requires you to use crampons, ice axe and helmet.

Glissading is the best way to get down!

Done on November 5th, 2017. Started sharp at 1am with full moon. We made to the top around 1pm. Last 2-3 miles where way less steep, but tiredness and elevation made us slow down a lot (big lunch break at ranger station). There was frost on top. With full moon and cool weather, I think is any serious hiker can do it. Easier than Iron Mountain!
Once you get at the Tram (bottom one) go to the cafeteria/coffee area (even if is close) to the back on the left side of the room there some multi-charging phone cables to charge phone (in case need to call a ride to go back to the museum)

Did this a couple days ago. Depending on where you cross the river, the trail can be hard to find. I walked up the dry creek bed for an hour and a half before realizing my mistake. That was frustrating. I found the trail using google maps, and took it. This trail needs maintenance! Got stung by a bee in the face, came in contact with both poison oak and poodle dog bush. I had to do a lot of bushwhacking, in these plants and others. Got stabbed by those pointy bushes that have like 100 spines. The trail was sketchy the entire way up to where I got, only about a mile in. However, some of these faults were my mistake, and I’ll try again next weekend.

Started early @5:00am to avoid heat once your close to summit old Baldy. Offered great views and great ascend and good training for Mt Whitney.

A good warm up trail for Mt Whitney training.

this is the best hike in the LA area if u want pain, growth and amazing geography lesson. The duration of elevation gain is second only to cactus to clouds (cdc), i used this to prepare for Iron mountain which this hike gives u great views of along woth baden powell,ross,pine,dawson, Gorgonio and Jacinto, mt dissappointment just about everything in LA and san bernardino.

this hike takes time, strength, and patience do something else first if u are not absolutely sure of your ability. U will be completely exposed amd sweating all your sunscreen off if its hot keep that in mind.

Second time I’ve done this hike, I’m ten years older now and felt every bit of it. This hike is relentless. It’s not too difficult or technical, but it does take planning and tenacity. All in all,I went through 5 liters of water, 4 Cliff Bars, 1 protein bar, 2 goos, and a pack of rehydration salts. Started shortly after midnight and summitted around 1 pm with a large group moving at a slow pace. Started with 3 liters of water and still had about half a liter when I refilled at the ranger station. The key to this hike is timing, you have to get out of the valley long before the sun comes up.

We did the hike on May 27, 2018. We started from the trailhead near the museum at 4 am, reached Long Valley just past 10. After long break and lunch at Long Valley, we arrived the peak at 2 pm. We were back to Long Valley about 4 pm. The changing views along the way and the view at the summit is impressive. But the challenge is not as great as we feared before the hike. I think it is slightly difficult than the Rim to Rim Hike in Grand Canyon. But it is well easy than the R3, which we did last year.

hiking
2 months ago

I'm going to start off by letting y'all know I am not an extremely experienced hiker. I hike here and there but not very often. With that being said, Mt. Baldy is definitely a challenge and if it weren't for my husband pushing me and motivating me along the way, I probably would have turned around half way. It is steep and rocky but there a few areas that are flat. The views are beautiful and it's a great feeling when you reach the summit. Make sure that if you have bad knees, like me, that you wear your knee brace and take Ibuprofen and plenty of water and snacks. It took us 6 hrs to summit and 3.5 hrs to get back down. It's windy up there so make sure to pack a sweater or jacket.

hiking
2 months ago

Climbed this bad boy overnight on May 27th to the 28th. Started at Bunny Flats at about 11:15pm, which was actually a bit too early, wish I would have started a bit later. I hit Lake Helen at about 1:45am but wasn't exactly sure the path I should follow up through Red Banks, so I kinda just found a place to lay down until campers started to wake up. Began the ascent through Red Banks at about 2:30am and my god it was tough, just seemingly endless. Made it to thumb rock right as the sun was rising, and it was sa-weet. Everything after that was tough, but no where near as hard as the section from Helen through Red Banks. Summited around 7am and was back at my car by noon.

A few points that I will explain that I was wondering before my hike. Things were very steep through Red Banks but never steep to the point that I felt unsafe; if you have crampons and an ice axe it's totally fine. You don't actually see the summit until you're basically there, so never assume that what you're looking at is the final prize. Hiking through the night was actually super ideal, great full moon made it so that I didn't have to use my headlamp, and was nice to have hard ice during the hike.

Everything was awesome, I highly recommend. I also beer bonged a bud light at the top, and surprisingly, helped ease my nerves on the descent.

Amazingly beautiful with a ridiculous view at the top. Hard hike but definitely not as hard as the mythology behind it would have you believe. Mostly requires the right prep. Both me and my buddy were in ok shape and trained for a few months. Did Iron Mt. one week out to test ourselves and parts of that we're actually tougher than C2C. Lucked out with amazing 85f weather on memorial day. Started at 2am, hit long valley by 10a, the peak by 2:30 (I was dragging from elevation nausea), back the tram at 6. 16 hours total but we took LOTS of breaks. Brought 5.5 L of water (didn't need it all on the skyline but best to be safe), 1 gatorade with extra salt in it (my buddy did salt pills), ate 9 GU gels, 3 clif bars and a banana. The biggest thing is just to keep fueling/hydrating yourself and taking the GUs almost hourly was a huge help I think. I got a Charley Horse in my quad pretty early on but was able to work through it. Used a GPX on our phone and had a Sat beacon for emergencies. GPS is huge help for the first 3rd of the skyline which you will prob do in the dark and has a lot of splitting. After that the trail is impressively well maintained and clear, and the notch at the top of the skyline trail is all switchbacks so it's hard but not awful. The push to the summit was the worst part for me. It's not steep but it just takes forever (lots of traversing) and by that point you are exhausted. Def need warm clothes for the summit. Hooded windbreaker and gloves were lifesavers.

BTW, as we were cresting the notch at 10am 2 trail runners ran past us the opposite direction having already summited mid-C2C2C. We had seen lights ahead of us early so they prob started just before 2a and looked fresh as hell 22 miles in at 10. So yeah... goals.

We started C2C on Saturday morning at 3am. We hadn’t done any similar hikes before. It is the hardest hike we’ve done so far. It was consistently steep from the start until you reached Long Valley. The view at the peak was worth it. For us, there were three essentials for completing this hike (aside from food and water): hiking shoes, offline map, and a phone charger if you are using your phone for the offline map. It is easy to get lost so a gps is a must. Per person, we brought 1 gallon of water, 32 oz of Gatorade, 3 GU gels, 5 granola bars, and 2 sandwiches. We didn’t have to refill our water at the ranger station since we had plenty of supply left when we got there. It was so cold and windy at the peak so I’m glad I brought a sweater. Overall, this is an awesome hike for experienced hikers. Plan ahead and check the weather.

Really worth the effort. The views at the top were amazing.

Started at 3 am made it to the tram at noon and after grabbing lunch at Peaks restaurant and wandering around made the peak at 4 pm.. Alllllll day hike, the majority of your pack weight should be water. In case you get hung up in lower elevation. You’ll need salts too. Great hike all in all.I had to turn off GPS though because I didn’t want to drain my battery life for pictures and such.

hiking
2 months ago

Did it on 5/25/18 - took Avalanche Gulch. Started exactly at midnight (parking lot - Bunny Flats), and reached the summit at 9:34am. Crampons and ice axe used from Horse Camp all the way to the summit. Only eight people summited on this day. Around 10am, the storm came in - cold (19 degrees on the summit), complete whiteout, snow, rain (lower elevation) - no wind. Unable to see anything on the way down all the way to Horse Camp - had to follow own steps from the ascent.

There are a few different ways to get to this peak no matter witch trail you take you’ll get some pretty good views on a clear day. Not much shade on the trails so I would start early and pack at least 2 litters of water.

This was all worth it! I loved the transition from desert to forest! It feels like two different hikes! We started at around 4:00 am made it to the top in 11 hours and got back to the tram at 5:00 pm.

The trail is very overgrown and the foileage was more cumbersome than it was enjoyable. The incline itself is a great workout but I just wish I wasn't fighting my way through all the brush. I am 90% sure we encountered some poison oak along the way... I would suggest wearing pants or leggings as well as a breathable long sleeve to avoid contact with unfriendly plants. I would NOT recommend taking dogs - our pups usually love a good hike but this trail begins in a rocky riverbed and there is hardly any shade on the way up. They didn't seem to be having too much fun in the overgrowth either.

Whoa. 11,000 ft of climbing! Started solo at 4:30 am with a headlamp, climbed and climbed for a little less than seven hours to hit the summit. (+ an extra two hours / 3000 ft of descent back to the tram and some french fries.) Despite a ton of experience on similar terrain -- especially at the lower elevations, the trails aren't that different than those I run in Scottsdale - I did have a little trouble finding the optimal route at times. Nothing serious, just added a bit to the growing paranoia one sometimes get when hiking unknown trails alone. Gear-wise, I brought a 70oz Nathan pack for water and like 20 Gu-type packets. I tucked a somewhat heavy technical hoodie into my pack and tied a light long sleeve shirt around my waist, but I ended up only using my long sleeve shirt for a few mins while I was chillin' (literally) at the summit.

Difficulty-wise, I'd put it in the same class as a Mt Whitney or a Pike's Peak or a Grand Canyon R2R. BTW - current record according to Strava? 3:35!

Amazing transitions from valley floor to high desert and into a true alpine ecosystem. Stout hike

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