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Hard rating is accurate. Most of this climb is sans trail, rather, you just follow cairns with wood posts to guide you up through the volcanic scree to the South Face approach. Did this on a Mon/Tue and it was still fairly crowded, I can’t imagine a weekend crowd. The glissade chutes are an absolute blast and cut your decent time significantly!

We had a bluebird day (7/11/18). All my pictures just won't do justice for the amazing views we had.

Very beautiful views around the top loop and is a decent place to stop if you have kids for lunch. I didn't see any large animals but did notice deer and bear scat. The left trail entrance has more sun exposure than the right trailhead entrance so if you are going in the heat of the day the right side would be better. It's a steady incline all the way up and steady decline down. It's safe for kids; no drop offs and my 4 year old did it with ease. There's no bathrooms but a portable restroom at trailhead.

Nice hike
Lots of bees near the water on the west side of the trail

Drove two hours, and let me tell you it was worth it!

The hike to the summit and back is actually 3.5 miles. If you continue on the primitive trail you will reach about 4.75 miles. Great hike!

Good hike.
A LOT of people thought so.

Good exercise, parking was full at 9am but overflow for $5 was nearby and empty at that time. Dog friendly on leashes.

One of my favorites for shorter hikes.

Please please please be careful if you hike off-road here. We have had way too many casualties here in the last few years from people swimming next to the falls or getting too close to cliffs. Bringing dogs or small children is not a good idea because the trail is so steep in some spots.

All of that said, the best time to come is Spring because the falls are still full, and the hikes are gorgeous. I do three different locations: hike out to where you can stand above the falls, hike along the walls of the canyon, and hike down to the water. The trail down to the water is very worn. It gets extremely hot here, so multiple water bottles is a must. Also, parking is by check or cash only unless you have a Discover pass.

It’s all worth it at the top, we were lucky to see many paraglider last weekend.

trail running
11 days ago

A first for me today.... no not the trail running....
But the BLACK BEAR I ran into near the top!
Let’s just say my run time down was a personal best!

amazing views! took the shortcut 3/4 the way to the top and ended about 3.5 miles round trip. a little dusty on the way back and exposed, but majority of the hike is covered pines and other foliage.

This trail is typically done in two days. Most people camp too early. I strongly suggest camping on your left-hand side of Lunch Counter right before the big push up. However, the right side did have a running stream from snow melt. All camp spots have access to snow for melting drinkable water. The camp spots are typically parapets made of lava rock with sandy floors. They make excellent wind breaks. We did this the last two days of July and I brought way too many warming layers. It was maybe 40°F on lunch counter and 60°+ in our 2-person summer lightweight. I suppose you should always prepare for a cold snap tho. Bring crampons and axe. The glissading chutes are deep and although steep, they are safe to slide down and I’ve been told on good years you can slide down all the way from the false summit to Lunch Counter. Bring a waterproof layer for glissading. Also, some snow gators would have been helpful. My wife’s feet remained dry with the gators, mine were soaked. Bring extra socks and leave another pair in the car. There was a large mountain sheep that gets within arms reach that apparently lives around Lunch Counter. The smoke from all the fires blocked our views of Hood, St. Helens, Rainier and others, but we could kind of make out the shapes. The top was super windy and cold. Bring some warm layers in daypack for the last ascent. I suggest snow gloves.

The Rangers’ at the ranger station were not very helpful. They warned of a massive thunderstorm when multiple websites we checked had “sunny w/ heat” advisory. I asked where she got her information which she seemed to take as a challenge, and said “NOAA is the only one you can trust for mountain climbing. Also you can’t see anything with the fires anyway.” SASSY! NOAA confirmed a heat advisory. We took her warning with skepticism and checked it out for ourselves. It was super sunny both days. I’m really just ranting at this point, but she would say things like, “conditions at altitude change in an instant,” and “It gets dark under those clouds real quick,” but when asked, she admitted she had not been up there and had no intention of climbing a mountain.

All things considered, this was a great climb. Will do again.

15 days ago

1st hike of the year. Steep but fun. beautiful views if Issaquah and Mt. Rainier

Hiked a car to car in 10.5hrs this Saturday, 7/28, started at 6am, back to the car at 4:30pm. 7hr ascent, 3.5hr descent. Crampons not needed but still recommended (I did see a lot of people using cleats though) Plenty of running water on the mountain. Summited at 1pm and peak was totally covered in clouds.. Glissading was very painful due to ice and hard to slow down. There were hundreds of people hiking on Saturday yet still managed to find a parking spot right at trail entrance #183. First time on Adams and was very fun despite cloudy peak and icy slide down!

This trail is typically done in two days. Most people camp too early. I strongly suggest camping on your left-hand side of Lunch Counter right before the big push up. However, the right side did have a running stream from snow melt. All camp spots have access to snow for melting drinkable water. The camp spots are typically parapets made of lava rock with sandy floors. They make excellent wind breaks. We did this the last two days of July and I brought way too many warming layers. It was maybe 40°F on lunch counter and 60°+ in our 2-person summer lightweight. I suppose you should always prepare for a cold snap tho. Bring crampons and axe. The glissading chutes are deep and although steep, they are safe to slide down and I’ve been told on good years you can slide down all the way from the false summit to Lunch Counter. Bring a waterproof layer for glissading. Also, some snow gators would have been helpful. My wife’s feet remained dry with the gators, mine were soaked. Bring extra socks and leave another pair in the car. There was a large mountain sheep that gets within arms reach that apparently lives around Lunch Counter. The smoke from all the fires blocked our views of Hood, St. Helens, Rainier and others, but we could kind of make out the shapes. The top was super windy and cold. Bring some warm layers in daypack for the last ascent. I suggest snow gloves.

The Rangers’ at the ranger station were not very helpful. They warned of a massive thunderstorm when multiple websites we checked had “sunny w/ heat advisory.” I asked where she got her information which she took as a challenge, and she said “NOAA is the only one you can trust for mountain climbing. Also you can’t seem anything with the fires anyway.” SASSY. NOAA confirmed a heat advisory. We took the warning with skepticism and checked it out for ourselves. It was super sunny both days. I’m really just ranting at this point, but she would say things like, “conditions at altitude change in an instant,” and “It gets dark under those clouds real quick,” but when asked, she admitted she had not been up there and had no intention of climbing a mountain.

All things considered, this was a great climb. Will do again.

Don’t underestimate Mount Hood. Lunch Counter is 100% snow feee with water. Glissade down was difficult do to icy hard chutes . . We summited at 8:30am.Hard to beat a sunrise at elevation . . Mountain shadow, etc . . But the downside this time of year is the iffy glissade down . . If you want an awesome glissade . . I would recommend a summit time around 11am. I would recommend crampons . . But spikes are probably good enough . . I just wouldn’t take the chance. Summit shack is just starting to come out. Summit weather at 8:30am was puuurfect . .zero wind, blue skies, and 5 Mountains were out: Rainier, Helens, Hood, Jefferson and 3 Sisters.

Awesome hike! Good steady incline all the way up with a terrific view. Careful on the way down as it can get slippery.

Such a great hike. Bring hiking poles as it can be slippery in places. we started pretty early and the ground was a bit damp. By time we came back down- there was no parking and super crowded. If you want to watch the paragliders but are not able to hike too far- there is a shuttle to take you to the top and back down. had a great time. We even hiked with our bulldog.

I recommend starting on the right side of the main entrance to the trail, which offers the shadier portion of the loop and the best views on the way down. You’re surrounded by lush forest during the first part of the loop, and it’s very peaceful with only the humming of the bees to break the silence. As a heads up, there are a LOT of bees on this trail and unfortunately I didn’t have any bug spray either so it was a tad bothersome for me. There were quite a few moderate inclines and it was pretty much incline the whole way up. Prepare to huff and puff at a few parts, but you’ll have a great workout.

I finished the shorter loop (left at the next signage) instead of heading up towards the right towards Big Rock. Soon I was in a flattened area of forest, which was a lovely respite from my uphill workout. This part made the whole hike worth it. Amazing views of the city and the open sky. The rest of the way was downhill without any shading. This side would be more difficult to climb up on a sunny day.

Overall, I would do this again for the amazing views and maybe check to out the longer trail. Bring water and bug spray!

Took my wife and teenage son and our dog. Great day for a short hike, and the Thimble Berries were plentiful!

I had the app pulled up almost constantly trying to stay on path. There are so many poorly marked trail the split off. It worked out, I was able to direct and dad and young son to a shorter trail that looped back to the start and another couple to the ponds. I also took a shorter path thanks to all the connecting trails.

Iller Creek has become increasingly popular over the last few years and it's understandable why. In a mere five miles you'll follow a trail that begins in thick, lush forest along the creek, then opens into views and multitudes of wildflowers, then the Rocks of Sharon with views across the Palouse. Old abandoned cars appear out of nowhere (seriously though...how did they get up there?!) and as you head back down the landscape changes again to one like you'd find in a western desert with views of the Spokane Valley. Keep an eye out for wildlife. I've encountered a moose, porcupine and many different birds on the trail. Every season brings something different to the Iller Creek Trail - give it a shot in the winter with your snowshoes!

A must-do if you live in the Spokane area.

hiking
24 days ago

The ridge offers 360 degree views of the Palouse and depending on the time of year you visit, the colors will shift, fade and brighten. The dry side of the butte is your typical desert...which means sun in your face and a chance to pretend it's springtime in the dead of winter. The north side of the butte has been taken over by lush forests...which means the wildlife is abundant as well.

The first 1.5 miles take you up to the ridgeThe trail is wide and the switchbacks are easily manageable.. From here you reach that view. And you can meander the ridge about .5 miles to take in every angle.

I managed to wander off the trail as per usual, so my hike ended up being closer to 4.5 miles, but finding a rock to sit on in the blinding sun while the pup ran through the tall grass made it worth it. I highly recommend staying for the sunset as well - just don't forget the park closes at dusk, so your hike down needs to be a bit speedy. You can return the way you came or take the back loop down to the campground.

My history with Antoine Peak is one of sheer frustration.

1st attempt: Got lost.

2nd attempt: Got lost again.

3rd attempt: Got lost in a blizzard. NEVER AGAIN.

Well, with the recent buzz about the re-vamped trail and shiny new trail markers I decided to give it a go once again. And I am so glad I did.

Antoine Peak's conservation area covers 1,076 acres in the Spokane Valley. It's summit offers 360-degree views of the region - Liberty Lake sparkles to the south with Mount Spokane and the Selkirks towering to the north. There is no shortage of breathtaking sights on this beautiful hike.

Early summer brings an abundance of wildflowers and candy-coated skies at sunset unparallel to other times of the year.

The new and improved trail system offers great signage meaning getting lost should be difficult to do. It also means you can determine how far you want your hike to take you as all markers give distance and direction. My pup and I did the loop from the Brevier Road trailhead. It leads you up to the summit and down around the Emerald Necklace loop along the base of the mountain back to where you started. The sounds of nature were absolutely spectacular...until they stopped altogether and I couldn't help but remember stories of cougar sightings on the hillside.

Don't let that stop you from visiting this beautiful trail right in our backyard though. Just be aware of your surroundings.

July - Summer

Nothing particularly spectacular about this trail. You can get some nice views of Spokane Valley and Liberty Lake, but aside from that, not much else to see.

The trail is very well maintained, and is mostly out in the open. The trail was very hot, and it was very dusty because of this. In most areas it was very wide which allowed two people to walk abreast.

The trail is mostly flat, but there is some elevation gain as you approach the peak. As some other people have noted, the AllTrails loop isn’t entirely accurate anymore, as one of the sections we followed clearly hadn’t been used in a long while.

Parking is free and is quite large.

Remember to bring water! Especially for the dogs, there is no water access on this trail.

As I usually say for this type of trail, not something I’d go out of my way for, but definitely worth checking out if you live near by.

hiking
25 days ago

Took two middle school boys on the full loop hike and it was awesome! The views of the fields this time of year are breathtaking. The hike was super easy. It says moderate but we barely broke a sweat. The trail is really well maintained but a little dusty in places so keep that in mind when you pick your hiking shoes. Also, be mindful of the rocks that are sticking out of the ground. They are perfect to catch a toe on and down you go.

has a little bit of everything, including an alternate rustic path up to the summit. great views of the Palouse landscape. the bedrock is quartzite--metamorphosed sandstone....sand from an ancient shoreline. pine trees and prairie flora. would recommend!

Great trail, very busy. Big incline at the beginning of the trail but gets easy near the top. It’s a rocky trail. There’s $5 over flow parking which was nice.

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