Explore To Hike: Multi-day Hikes - view hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

To Hike: Multi-day Hikes Map
VIEW FULL MAP
hiking
5 days ago

Scariest hike ever. I'm talking about the cable portion, it is steep as hell and even steeper than photos when you see it in person. But it is do-able you just have to focus on moving to the next wooden board. The wooden boards I believe are spaced out 10 feet from each other from the bottom of the dome to the top. It took us about an hour just to get to the top because there was traffic lots of people going up and down simultaneously. We had to take turns for those coming down and those going up. To get to the top without traffic should only take maybe 10-15 mins to give perspective on what traffic does. Also the traffic IMO makes it more scary because you have to hold onto the cables even longer.

I'd recommend using gloves with a latex coating to help with the cables as it gives your hands much more grip and you'll avoid blistering your hands like many other people.

I'd recommend doing it if you want to face your fears. Just take it one wooden board at a time until you reach the top and you'll be fine. Lots of people did it and have done it.

Would I do it again? Probably not lol just because it was scary as shit. BUT DO IT ONCE AT LEAST :D

My favorite Hike Gorgeous!

Did this as a day trip in December. Just want to point out it is quite doable as a day trip given it is done in the winter and you’re used to doing 25-30 mile hikes. Started with Dodson trail, which is actually fairly mild and undulating. Up juniper canyon in he heat of the day tough but doable. Smooth sailing down the blue creek canyon into the sunset. Awesome hike, right among my top hiking experiences.

Greenstone not for the mild hiker. Took 5 boys and two adults on four day hike. Should of make it a six day. Shelters are at Rock Harbor and Windigo only. Beautiful site.

hiking
11 days ago

I'm a relatively inexperienced backpacker, having done maybe a dozen 2-3 night camping trips and this was definitely one of the more challenging ones I've done, mostly bc of the elements (heat and lack of water).

Route: Clockwise from Chisos Basin Visitor Center + Southwest Rim (~35 miles)
Day 1: Visitor Center up the Pinnacles, down Juniper Canyon to the Dodson Trail. I wish I had made it to Fresno Creek so I could have binged on water, but I ran out of daylight.
Day 2: Stopped at Fresno Creek for coffee, then to Home Ranch for lunch and up Blue Creek to the South Rim. I camped at SW4, which was close to this great overlook on the Rim, made for some great pics.
Day 3: Out of food and low on water, I couldn't sleep and hiked out at 4AM. I bypassed the full South Rim trail and went straight to Boot Canyon so I could refill at Boot Spring. Then on the Colima Trail to Laguna Meadows Trail.

Would not recommend the early departure for two reasons. One, the South Rim has epic views, and sunrise there looks incredible. Boot Canyon is also worth seeing, and though it was nice to observe it by moonlight, I knew I was missing out. Second reason, I saw a mountain lion on the trail and those things terrify me. Should have just waited until sunrise.

Stupidly, I only brought capacity to carry 3L of water. This made for a light pack, which was nice going up the Pinnacles on Day 1 and up the Blue Creek Trail switchbacks on Day 3, but I was pretty dehydrated by the end of it. I should have brought another 2L empty bladder with me and filled it at Boot Spring.

It's definitely worth reading through Big Bend Chat forum on water sources and caching at Home Wilson Ranch. Just be familiar with what you're looking for. I got water at Boot Spring (which is marked with a sign) about five miles into Day 1, and Fresno Creek early on Day 2. Thankfully there were some extra gallons at Home Wilson, too, that I binged on and took 3L with me to camp up on South Rim, then refilled again at Boot Spring early on Day 3 and hiked out. In hindsight, this was stupid bc Boot Spring could have run dry (Dodson Spring had gone dry just a day before I got there) and it would have been a tough dry Day 3 hike.

General Thoughts:
- Top three hike of my life
- November is a terrific time to do it. Highs around 80, lows in the mid-40's, decent amount of water on the trail (though you obviously can't bank on this).
- Glad I camped on South Rim, the sunset views were absolutely stunning.
- All of the trails up around Chisos Basin, Emory Peak, South Rim, etc. are extremely well defined and well-marked. It's out in the zoned camping areas where you have to be careful (Juniper, Dodson, Blue Creek)
- The rangers were super helpful; the only thing they gave me a hard time on was that I didn't cache water. She "strongly encouraged" me to cache water at Home Wilson; I didn't, but she was right.
- Should have brought sun block, long sleeve shirt and a sun hat for Dodson Trail and Blue Creek. There is very very little shade out there.
- The caution about losing the trail is not entirely overreaction. There are cairns, but some get knocked out from flash floods, or are pretty far apart. I lost the trail on Dodson a couple times, but backtracked easily enough and found it. I could have saved twelve bucks on the Nat Geo map and just printed one out from Big Bend Chat.
- Do it in November! High of 80, low in the mid-40's and some water already out there (though it's tough to bank on this). This would have been much more challenging in the summer, and miserable to carry all that water. I probably would have cut out the South Rim and done it on a long day hike based from Chisos or something.
- You could start/finish from Homer Ranch and cut out the Chisos Basin, but I'm glad I didn't. The Chisos was pretty nice, and the long early morning walk down Laguna Meadow after camping on South Rim on night 2, so relaxing and great way to wind down the trip. Plus, you can then binge on ice cream at the camp store.

I cannot say enough about this hike/camping experience! The hike itself was not too difficult if you are already a hiker and all the history, story telling, and unbelievable food made it even more comfortable and exciting. The steps get a little daunting at times but nothing you cannot do with a little training. I live at a high elevation (5,300 ft) and have hiked up to 13,000 ft so the altitude was not really felt which made it easier. Machu Picchu itself is very crowded but many of the other sites along the way were essentially empty. The flora/fauna is incredible. You see everything from rain forest to desert! I recommend good shoes, rain gear, walking poles for uphill, and a water reservoir in your pack. I found I drink more water and don't have to stop every time I get thirsty. This is a life changing hike and one I highly recommend!

Amazing hike did this back in September and forgot to put a review, but this hike is beautiful! We left early in the morning at 2am and it was perfect going up in the dark with headlamps and enjoying seeing things from a different perspective rather than going later like 7am so heading down you see everything that you didn’t going up so it makes the hike better since it’s pretty much a 10hr hike. Going up early at 2am and not knowing much farther you have to go was just great, but to just keep moving and the hike went by quick because by the time daylight started to show we were at the base of sub dome. Heading down was quick n easy, but by 10am traffic rolls in and makes it difficult.

Leave early for the hike to make the cables with little to no traffic. Make it before 8am cause up top people start to roll in and head down the cables with traffic is a pain to wait for people to pass n continue to descend.

The hike in general starts pretty easy for those that hike normally. The hike gets tough when you hit the foot high steps n they continue to get higher n higher, but that’s why you start early n you don’t see how much farther you have to go. Sub dome is just the same a bunch of foot high steps, but aren’t to bad if you go early and rest at the steps. Cables were surprisingly easy both up and down. Down is easiest, but going up isn’t bad if you have RUBBER GLOVES. Crazy beautiful site seeing going up cables and top. Used my GoPro and the videos are awesome.

Pack some good food and 4L of water. I managed to make it with 3L and have some left over,but it’s probably because we left early in morning.

Go prepared (food&water), go early, proper gear (boots&gloves, don’t forget permit, and enjoy the views going down.

hiking
18 days ago

What can I say, basically nothing beats this for a day hike.

Hiked this as part of a two day trip this weekend. We hiked up to Icewater Spring shelter to overnight, then went on to Mt LeConte (and down the Alum Cave Trail) the next day. I think this is a total ascent of 1500 feet, rather than what’s listed: check other sources. Some great views along the way on a fairly strenuous hike. There is a nice spring available for water near the shelter, btw. Trail was in good condition. Few people on the trail, at least at this time of year.

hiking
28 days ago

The toughest I have ever done!! absolutely worth it! Me and friend went during off season when the cables came down. If that's the case please bring safety equipment (carabineers, harness, leather gloves) if you are planning to do the 400 ft. climb along the face of Half Dome. We did not have that equipment so I didn't do it, because safety always comes first! Have a safe hike guys and don't forget to bring lots of water and salted snacks :)

One for the bucket list.

day two was hard as i feared

Amazing journey through spectacular scenery ranging from alpine desert to rainforest. Unforgettable NatGeo experience!

hiking
1 month ago

Awesome hike with amazing views at the top of half dome. I did this as a day hike in November with the cables down. I left the valley at 630 am right as the sun was coming out and I was the ONLY person at half dome. Had the whole place to myself. The hiking by Vernal and Nevada falls is the toughest part. Half dome is easy with a harness, some rope, and some leather gloves. Half dome with the cables down is a much more enjoyable experience, you just have to be more prepared but definitely worth it! Total hike took 9 hours to the top of half dome and back to the valley, the hike is tough and exhausting but with the appropriate rest and breaks it can be very enjoyable.

hiking
1 month ago

An incredible experience, the trail, the views, the guides, the porters, the chefs and the food!! The great friends made during the hike. And of course Machu Picchu!!!

Great hike. Nov 03, 2018. Dark and cold start but beat the crowd. Very foggy, pretty cold ( about 22 degrees)
Snow at higher elevations, really pretty. Great hike because it’s up and down. Kinda easygoing and pleasant because it isn’t straight up. Fog cleared lots of great views. My new favorite. It was a Saturday traffic coming out was bad. Peach season Saturday.

Hiked in April and was a truly amazing trip. Quite hard, but worth it. It rained 2 of 4 days, but we managed to stay out of torrential downpours. The only thing I'd wish I'd known was how much horse poo would be on the trail.

hiking
1 month ago

Certainly a hike for your bucket list. Just make sure that you get your permits in advance. We tried to get ours on 5 separate occasions and never got lucky. In the end, on our last day in Yosemite, we decided to hike up anyway to see how far we would be allowed to go. As luck had it, we ran into a group of other hikers who had 2 extra permits, so we were able to make it all the way to the top. Otherwise, the permit check is just below Subdome, which means is that there are some views to be had even without the permit, however, they are nowhere near as impressive as from the top and you won't even see the Half Dome at all. The rangers check the your permit against an ID of at least one person in the group, so if you don't get lucky with your own applications, you really need to find a group of people who have extra permits - getting a permit from people who get tired and turn back doesn't help.

As for the hike itself, it is not nearly as difficult as I had expected it to be. That said, it does take a better part of the day, so be prepared for it, head out early in the morning and bring plenty of water, especially if going in summer. The cables look scarier than they in fact are - the only annoying thing about them is trying to avoid all the people going in the other direction, especially if you arrive during a busier day.

On the way back, my suggestion would be to take the John Muir Trail between Nevada and Vernal Falls. It might be slightly longer but offers stunning views of Nevada Falls and is also less steep than the Mist Trail - something your knees might thank you for later.

In all, if you have the chance and ability, I really can't recommend this highly enough!

We hiked this trail for our honeymoon and it was amazing. It is very challenging but worth it! Definitely bring Deet spray for chiggers, they’re worse than mosquitos.

Did the trek in Aug with REI adventures. Food and lodging was amazing. The hike took us 6 days with the longest day being 9 miles. Not very many people on the trail and the weather was perfect. Hardest day was getting up and over the pass at 15,200 feet. Take diamox if needed and acclimate a few days in Cusco or higher if able.

I thought the Alum Cave trail would still be my favorite route up when I planned the Boulevard ascent - I was wrong. I love every minute of this mostly solitary walk in the woods (very little traffic after peeling off at the 2.7 mile mark). From Newfound Gap parking to Myrtle point in 2:45. Spent a considerable amount of time there with the place to myself. Then from Myrtle Point to the Jump Offs (added on my return) and back to the parking lot in 2:40. I was beat by day’s end, but loved every step of my GPS’d 19+ mile day.

Vernal and Nevada trail is the hardest part. Once you past that, the rest of the trail is a piece of cake until you get to the sub dome part. Be prepared to scramble your way up to get to the end.

hiking
1 month ago

So maybe we cheated a bit on this, and instead of trekking up from Yosemite Valley floor (y'alls that do it: mad props! that's beast mode hiking right there!), we camped out at the Little Yosemite Valley, and trekked up to the rock at sunset to have a nice view with our dinner...
it is NOT an easy hike... esp. the last part (subdome and the cables). by the time we got to the rock, it was about an hour and 15 minutes to sunset, and thank god there were only three people on the cables coming down, otherwise, it was just our group of 6. i don't know if i'd be able to do the cables if there were a ton of people on them... it is sketchy as heck. do invest in good grippy shoes and super grippy gloves. you'll thank both later. our guide gave us a good advice (it goes esp. for those who have the fear of heights): don't look around, concentrate on the next plank in-front of you, and go from plank to plank in counts of five... take all the rest you need.
THE VIEWS ARE WORTH IT!!!
my personal suggestion for this hike would be to break it up... trek up to LYV, spend the night or rest up... and then continue with the trek up to Half Dome, or do it the next day. :)

hiking
1 month ago

Great hike! Did it 10/14 (first weekend that cables are down). Set off at sunrise, up the Mist trail and back down JMT. Took around 7 hours total with no traffic up to summit. I was actually expecting the hike up to be more strenuous since I’ve just started hiking, but it was absolutely fine. Most tiring bit are the stairs up to sub dome. I had perfect conditions for this and it wasn’t too hot so I survived fine on 2l of water. Saw mother bear and 2 cubs on the way back too!

hiking
1 month ago

Read a bunch of reviews and feel like most are somewhat exaggerated. Did this hike in about 9.5 hours, and you definitely want to start at about 2am. I started at 2:30am by myself, first time hiking in the dark with an REI 20$ headlamp, and what an experience. Couldn’t see but could hear the water falls roaring, and the night critters were frequent on the trail. The headlamp did its job and being up on the cables at sunrise was magical, as well as the dark night sky on the way up. Going down was no problem until vernal/nevada fall, when the trail was packed with people, without much regard for others on the trail. For this I probably would have went JMT, but I wanted to see the things I couldn’t see on the way up. Also the sub dome is not that grueling, and it really only lasts about 20 minutes to the base of the cables.

Didn’t do much training for this, did Four Mile Trail, Eagle Peak, clouds rest, and MT. Hoffman spread out in weeks time. Took 30 liters of water with me and a water filter, to cut down on weight and didn’t have to use the filter (starting in the dark keeps the heat down). Overall awesome experience, happy to do it. Saw loads of people going up as I was going down so start early before 5am if you want to miss that, as there was no waiting on the cables going up or down, which made it easier.

I’m so glad that we didn’t take classic Inca trail. Salkantay trail is definitely marvelous, holy, peaceful and not crowded at all. Our trip with “Alpaca Expedition “ makes the 4-day trekking flawless.

hiking
1 month ago

Nice to have done it but the views aren’t the best. You can’t see Half Dome from Half Dome.

hiking
2 months ago

Went solo on this trip the last week in September in 9 days/8 nights. One needs a permit and there is an easy system to sign up on-line either through a lottery system in March or there are walk-up intermarry possibilities if one has a flexible schedule. Also, routes can either be clock-wise or counter clock-wise in layout. The hike could be comfortably be done in 7 days/6 nights from a mileage perspective. I would rate this as 'hard' but not that 'difficult' in that there is +/- 25,000 ft. of elevation gain and loss for the whole hike, 2k-3K per day on average. It is hard as there is so much up and down. Hiking poles for me were a must. It is not difficult in that it is, during the summer months, a heavily traveled trek and the trails are generally well maintained and easy to follow forest paths. Each day you at going up and down at least one major 2K+ foot section between camps. With side-trips, the 93- 96 mile trek easily ends up over 100+ miles. I took the alternative 'Spray' trail in the northwest as this route is higher up, with closer views of the mountain. There are mountain goats, elk, dear and bear and, the ever present marmots. The weather cooperated, for the most part - 4 days of sunshine, 3 days of overcast, 1 day of rain and 1 day of snow (at 6,000 ft.). The temperature was in the 50s during the day which made for excellent hiking conditions, without overheating. There were no bugs and few people in the camp sites in late September. One is rewarded throughout with spectacular views of the mountain, hills, valleys and rivers as well as different scenery on each day as one heads through different sections and climate zones. In late September, the colors of the bushes change to fiery reds, oranges, yellows and purples - all providing a stark contrast to the bare mountain terrain they grow on. The Wonderland Trail takes one through barren outcrops, subalpine meadows, old growth forests, 'burned' out sections that are regenerating, talus fields and, of course, raging glacial river valleys which leave their silty/rocky deposits below. It is 'hard' because of the elevation gains and losses. All bridges were in place and markers in riverbeds were easy to spot as one navigated low lying sections. I enjoyed the campsites as they all have backcountry privies that are convenient and bear poles for your food/trash at night. In late September, there are few that you are sharing with. One of the pluses for this type of hike is that in each corner of the park, there are cache points to pre-stage food if you choose not to carry it all with you. Further, all campsites, save one, had stream, lake or other water sources near by so water for cooking and drinking was not a problem. Few trails of this length are as well laid out and maintained, with spectacular scenery, and this is the grand daddy of them all. Take the time - it is worth it.

Amazing!!! Such a cool bucket list hike. It’s the cables that make it so unique and such a cool experience. Took us about 10 hours round trip. Our feet were hurting at the end and we were definitely tired. Started at 6:15a and found easy parking in the parking lot closest to the trailhead. We were surprised that the parking lot was so full. Met a lot of nice and enthusiastic hikers. Had an amazing day! Can’t believe we hiked half dome!!!! We won our permits unexpectedly for the last day that the cables were up. Pretty lucky!

2 months ago

Awesome hike and definitely a bucket list item. Did it October 6th, took under 11 hours, absolutely gorgeous day and the views are killer as always. Took Mist trail up and John Muir trail back- though the JMT is longer by a mile the grade is much easier on the knees going down.
- while Mist trail is hard especially between Vernal and Nevada Falls, in my opinion Sub-Dome is the hardest part. It lasts forever or so it feels and the cables look easier in comparison.
- second time doing it, not sure I'll do it again but that's what I said 6 years ago so we'll see.

Load More