Explore To Hike - view hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

To Hike Map
VIEW FULL MAP
hiking
2 days ago

Wonderful hike especially if you have a photographers eye. Great workout as well.

I love this trail. It has a streams, waterfalls and gorgeous mountain views. My favorite hike in Georgia.

pretty trail. lots of exposed rock, choose appropriate shoes. very well kept path, and clearly marked. I did a mix of running, and power hiking.

bring adequate water. I didn't see any on the trail.

Good trail for hikers and dogs. Once you get out of parking lot area not many people. A few “water crossings” not really water crossings but water on ground is great for dogs. Added miles making it an 11 mile loop in four hours. There was good up and down making it a great workout. Lots of fallen leaves at moment which did make it hard to see slippery rocks so watch footing.

Not fun, no views. Better hikes in the area.

We started the trip from our camp site which added about a mile in length. The true beginning of the trail starts at a parking lot going to your right. If all you care to see if the lookout then it is at the end of the trail to your left about 50 yards. The trail was difficult at the beginning and end with many steep inclines. I would not recommend this trail for children or dogs. There are many spots in the trail that are very narrow and you have to cross water a couple of times. There are a few spots to stop with benches and many areas with large bolders where we stopped to have lunch. Our trip took about 6.5 hours with a total of 9.4 miles. Overall I would recommend this trail especially this time of year with the leaves changing color.

backpacking
22 days ago

Janet and I thru hiked the Bartram Trail.
On Sunday 10/7/18, We drove up the Forest Service road to less than a mile to the trail and camped on Cheoah Bald in NC. Monday 10/8/18-Tuesday 10/16/18, we hiked south to Russell Bridge in GA, with a shuttle by Michael Newton from Wallace Branch to Hickory Nut.
Trail maintenance was best at day hike areas and worse far from road crossings. Every day in GA and NC involved multiple large trees across the trail and blow downs. The hike up Wolf Mt in NC was difficult due to 6 days of food, poor maintenance and steep terrain. Speed Gap in GA has a huge blow down just beyond the etched Bartram Trail Rock. It completely obscured the trail for hikers coming from Russell Bridge toward Warwoman Dell.
We had a great time. Other than the beautiful Saturday on Rabun Bald and parking areas, we saw 4 hikers in 9 days.

I am so glad I picked this trail. We started from Backcountry Info Booth, right near Standing Indian Campground.

We started counter-clockwise on the Kimsey Creek Trail from the Campground and hiked about 5 miles until we reached Standing Indian shelter, where we camped for the first night.

Day 2 we walked around 15 miles northbound on the AT. When you reach the junction to get on the AT at the end of Kimsey Creek, make sure you go North, which will be to your left (this happens before Standing Indian Campground). We hiked all the way until the summit of Albert Mountain and camped at the top. The best parts of the trail are immediately before you begin the ascent to Albert Mountain and the views here. I would also recommend staying at Carter Gap shelter if you’re looking to shorten the mileage / day. We stopped here for lunch around 4:00 pm after leaving Standing Indian Shelter at 11:00 am.

Day 3 was very quick, purely downhill 5 mile finish back to our car. Nothing too remarkable.

Overall, some inclines that are challenging, but the two newbies with me never felt really exhausted. I would recommend going clockwise if you want to avoid a very steep climb over rocks up to Albert, but those with some experience I do endorse the counter-clockwise route.

Great weekend!

Not enough to see for such a long hike.

beautiful trail for a short hiking

1 month ago

awesome. definitely longer than 8 miles, great views. good workout

This is a great 3-day hike that you can do as a loop from the Standing Indian Campground. We enjoyed hiking North to South, starting from Standing Indian, going up the Long Branch Trail to the AT, then turning right and hiking until the Kimsey Creek Trail, then back to the campground.

We camped the first night at Long Branch Shelter (great water source, new shelter and picnic table), and the second night at the Beech Creek tenting area. We loved both spots. This hike isn't super strenuous, goes through pretty canopy and has some pretty vistas, especially at the top of Albert Mountain from the firetower. We carried a bear canister and had no problems.

I didn't love the Kimsey Creek trail - it's very wet and slippery, with a lot of fallen trees crossing the trail. Otherwise, the rest of the hike was wonderful, with well maintained trails.

1 month ago

Hiked from Brasstown Bald to Trackrock Gap! Being a senior citizen (70) & “flatlander” (Louisiana), I thought I’d try the predominantly downhill trail first! Look forward to going back later in the fall for more great views! Other reviewers mentioned the tough “uphill” from Trackrock at the beginning, but it wasn’t a picnic for these tired old knees going downhill either! Very little water so better pack yours in! Definitely take hiking sticks! Lifesavers! 3 1/2 hours! Not bad for an old guy! Hike on!

2 months ago

Slow uphill. Steep slope to rock overlook. Robe on trees to hold

Just a heads up: the trailhead is on the opposite side of the road from the parking lot. Don't make the mistake I made, and take the game trail in front of the parking lot.

Very solid and well maintained trail. I'd recommend using Guthook's Guide as well as AllTrails app since you are walking the AT for most of this loop. It'll help with planning your water stops. Finished the trail in 2 days, but I'd recommend 3 if you want to have a more casual time. The shelters and sites are spaced pretty well if you'd rather average 8-9 miles a day.

I headed counter-clockwise down the Kimsey Creek trail first. It was bit overgrown and there were several blowdowns for the first half mile or so, but as long as you are paying attention you shouldn't have any issues. This portion follows and cuts across streams almost constantly so you will have no problem with water. I'd suggest filling up before heading up to Standing Indian mountain though, just in case.

After Carter Gap shelter, it's pretty much smooth sailing until a couple miles before the Long Branch junction. On my trip, there was a massive blowdown fully blocking the trail. I climbed over the tree, but I would 100% recommend that you try to squeeze under it or maybe hike up the mountain a bit to walk around it. It had rained earlier that day and everything was slippery.

If you are heading NOBO, the hike up Albert Mountain is pretty intense. It's half stairs, half rock climbing. There is a bypass you can use which follows a forestry service road for a bit and reconnects on the other side. It took me roughly 30 mins to climb the 0.3 mi from the base to the fire tower. I hiked this part after it rained, and the rocks were pretty slippery. You can always do the bypass then just hike SOBO up to the tower.

Awesome change of scenenry along a short 8 miles! It was more difficult than I expected....but I based my expectation off of the State Park Trail Map. It had the completion time for the 1.2 mile flat gravel trail around the lake at 1 hour. It had the completion time for the Gahuti trail at 5 hrs for 8 miles...it actually took me 5 full hours. Lots of ups and downs. I saw a lot of squirrels and a family of raccoons. The lake trail and the wall trail are not actually part of the g
Gahuti but I did those as well. When you are in this park it doesn't feel like you are in the mountains at all...untill you get to the overlooks! Reminded me of the Cloudland Canyon west rim trail.

hiking
2 months ago

Great trail even with all the leaves on the trees. That said, I plan to re-hike this great trail this winter. Started the hike from the Trailhead at Trackrock Gap. About the first 1.5 miles, I didn't find it brutal at all. It was a steady climb with a number of switch backs and never really leveled off until the ridgeline was gained. I'm not a particularly fast hiker and average just a little over 2mph including photo stops and short bushwhacks (like Locust Log Ridge and Chimneytop). As I write this, I am a couple weeks short of 64. Don't let some of the negative comments about the first 1.5 miles of the trail scare you away. It is a fantastic trail. Once I hit the Brasstown Bald parking lot (huge) I headed to the end and took Wolfpen Ridge Trail to the peak of Wolfpen Ridge (South) and a little beyond then I turned around and went back to the Brasstown Bald parking (the other end) and took the paved trail to the top. At the Visitor's Center (top of the mountain) I asked an attendant where the official top of the mountain was. She took me out to the breezeway between the Visitor Center and the Theater where she unlocked a door that had a stairway leading down (basement?) on the very top step she pointed to a USGS Benchmark. I took a picture of the BM and put my foot on it. Returning to the parking lot I used a two car shuttle to return to my parked car at Trackrock Gap. Great hike.

It was a short hike from the parking area to the suspension bridge. Once there it was very scenic with lots of open forest with a fire ring or two. It was easy access to the Taccoa River where dogs can get a drink and swim. After crossing the bridge we the hiked up to the mountain top. There are no views up there but it was a nice work out with beautiful summer foliage.

hiking
2 months ago

Brett below is right about the first 1.7 miles. It's a tough start! There are other uphill portions too, but none that difficult. Still, if you have enough water, it's doable. Some of the more level bits in the middle offer some through-the-trees views of other mountains, and other parts wind through classic Appalachian hollows. The "last" section (before you turn around) starts at the ranger station and has you walk up a steep paved path to the highest point in Georgia: Brasstown Bald. There should be some spectacular views if it isn't hazy. That portion is accessible by car, and so you'll be joined by some more casual hikers. There's also a visitor center up there.

Trail is dog friendly, although there is no water except the fountains and vending at the ranger station.

2 months ago

Great hikes to lovely waterfalls with pools to lie in. Clayton, Ga

Trail is tough. Not super crowded. No views, but beautiful area. Summer growth is over taking trail in places.

I’ll give it middle of the road, if you like hiking or what to see what it’s like on parts of the AT this is a good place. There’s not any overlooks past the Bear trail and no waterfalls but for pure hiking this is still fun. Our family enjoyed it.

hiking
3 months ago

We did the full loop, clockwise, in just under 5 hours. I’ll give it three stars because no matter what, it’s still in beautiful north Georgia. Downsides include lots of road noise, major overgrowth (at times I couldn’t see my feet and the growth was above my waist), pretty much zero scenic lookouts in the summer, and bears. There was one loose at the camp site when I started the hike and I’ve noticed a common theme in these reviews.

Did in November and was a challenge then counter clockwise and was even more challenging in the summer clockwise!

We did run into a few bear cubs, but nothing major and was safe hanging in a plastic bag unexpectedly spending the night on trail!

I love this track. It’s a great challenge and wonderful workout! I have been able to complete counter clockwise in one day, but clockwise always catches me a few miles short for a one day completion. I’ll get there!

My main reason for setting camp was the downpour and being out of water after the Duncan ridge split. Clockwise, it was straight up!

Heard the thunder threatening, and booked it to a camp site I’ve stayed beforehand re and knew water is close. Hunkered down for the rain in the hammock. Once it moved on, came out for a nice fire since we covered the firewood and a warm mountain house meal!

Tried to catch some rest, but after the storm and out location in hammocks, the breeze was a bit chill. May have slept 3 hours. Got up, warmed by a nice fire, mountain house meal for breakfast and come coffee. A few miles and we were off the trail.

We parked in an intersecting road and tapped the tail from there. Much recommend if you want the “free feeling.” Not as in not paying out park fees, but able to do what you like. We entered a great spot to start our trip.

Great track! Get out and hit it! It’s a great conditioning run!

Great trail! Lots of ups and down to keep your heart pumping and plenty of beautiful views to keep you interested along the way.

hiking
3 months ago

A friend and I came to the area to hike Neels Gap to Blood Mountain but the weather was horrible and she wasn't too comfortable doing that much elevation in the pouring rain.
We opted for this trail instead. It was October so there was still enough leaves to canopy us some from the pouring rain. It was quite lovely. The trail is really interesting but it was quite slippery in places due to all the rocks.
We intend on revisiting this entire area in the near future and revisiting this trail and the ones we missed.

backpacking
3 months ago

Just finished an overnight on this loop. Last nights highlights:

-torrential rain, has a rain forest jungly feel
-trails are clear but lots of growth hanging over and slapping my bare legs, i recommend long pants unless you like thousands of plants slapping your ankles. i was astounded i had no poison ivy rash or any issues though so the plants on this trail are not mean
-i rounded a corner and surprised a black bear on the trail..fortunately he panicked first and sprinted down hill so fast he started tumbling
-lots of climbing and elevation(for georgia) 4200 ft. that means cooler air and a nice sleep if you camp above 3500
-not stunningly scenic but a great workout loop. you should be in decent shape or the climbing might get old
-personal pet peeve with this trail is hearing highway noise while in my tent. i like hearing owls, crickets, and running water when im in my tent. maybe it was where i camped.

Straight up climb. Great exercise! Even better views! :)

backpacking
3 months ago

This was our first trail to backpack overnight. The scenery is beautiful. It is a pretty hard trail the first 2 miles and the last 2 miles. There are 4 campsites. The campsites just have a flat spot for your tent and a fire pit. The only complaint was that campsite one was not marked and was right on the trail. The trail is a little grown over at places with tall grass and poison oat so be sure to wear appropriate clothing and bring bug spray. This is black bear country so be smart. We will definitely be returning.

Load More