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hiking
2 days ago

A beautiful and "casual" trail located at the tippy top of Point Reyes. Alltrails listed this as a very heavy traffic trail, which is true - depending on the time and day you are going - try going earlier! My boyfriend and I went on Saturday morning around 8:15 AM and there was about 4 total cars in the tiny parking lot. When we left, around 12:15ish, there was no parking anywhere -- uphill, downhill etc. As we're walking back - there was people everywhere! So come early

For those who do come later, when there is no parking, please be considerate and NOT park on the lanes leading to McClure Beach... these are narrow ass roads already - we don't need your cars blocking the road even more... talking to you Prius and Toyota owners! Huge abundance of these cars blocking roads, not cool.

Also, need a restroom? The parking lot DOES NOT HAVE A restroom - you would need to trek or drive down a short ways to McClure beach parking for the restroom.

The trail itself is very beautiful, the last 2 miles are UN-MAINTAINED!! The plants and wildlife overgrown in these areas, so be prepared to get scratched if you are not dressed correctly or don't care!

To be honest, we both wore shorts and the bushes didn't bother us too much.

The last few miles also have SANDY PATCHES. Holy crap, walking up sandy that sink your feet is no fun! Just an FYI.

The first 3 miles were amazing. Lots of downhill coastal scenery to be viewed, ocean waves crashing along the cliffs/beaches and rocks, elk everywhere! A bit windy, but with all the hiking - you get warm fast! Bring a jacket just in case there is fog, luckily my trip there was none.

The hike totals about 4.83 miles each way totally 9.66 miles, from parking to the very tip of the rocks where you can see waves crashing along tidal pools. Alltrails says it's moderate and that definition of moderate varies by individuals for sure. The level of this hike will depend on how you generally hike... going back to the parking lot is pure up hill. About 1-2 miles is just up-hill nonstop so be wary of that... suggest to bring enough water!

At the end, after going through shrubs upon shrubs, you are met with beautiful coastal view, you can climb down the lowest of the rocky platforms to get a nicer view -- it was well worth the 3 hour and 41 minute trek.

Hiked Broke-off Mountain alone at age 67 with back pack expecting to to camp. At 2 miles in water was scarce. I ditched pack and day sacked to summit. Hazy day from fires and 85 + temperatures water was precious. Suggest to carry plenty and conserserve for hike out. Beautiful views, flowers, and butterflies. Difficult but doable round trip with day sack. Enjoy.

The hike shown here is actually from Barcroft Station, not the locked gate where you will likely have to start. From the locked gate, it is actually seven miles each way for a total of 14 miles. If you wish to do the shorter hike from Barcroft Station, you must wait for one of the ‘Open Gate Days’. There are usually two open gate days each summer - one in July and one around Labor Day Weekend. And on these days, you can drive all the way to Barcroft for the shorter hike shown here. Check the Barcroft Station website (www.wmrs.edu) for the dates of these open gate days if you are interested.

Regardless, as you likely know, White Mountain Peak is the third highest peak and easiest 14er in California. Altitude aside, the trail itself is actually VERY easy. Much of it is quite level. And the relatively modest amount climbing that you DO do is fairly gentle. Furthermore, the Jeep Trail that you hike on is relatively easy terrain-wise. No outlandishly rough rocky trails or foot high stone steps here! The only challenge for some is going to be the fact that almost ALL of the trail is above 12000ft. This makes White Mountain Peak PERFECT for acclimation if you plan to climb other high stuff.

It seems like reviews of the scenic beauty of the area tend to be mixed. And that’s to be expected of an area like the White Mountains. Many people don’t like the area and/or consider it boring due to its lack of classic hiking features like deep forests, lakes, streams, and waterfalls. But others (like myself) LOVE this area for what it DOES offer. Lower down (while still driving), you have the Bristlecone Pines - the oldest trees known. Their wind-twisted forms simply add to the exotic appearance of the area. The stark, rather barren terrain and multicolored rocky peaks gives the area an otherworldly look. And when you combine this with the deep blue high altitude skies and sunshine that is brighter than ANYTHING you will see at sea level, this area just SCREAMS ‘La La Land’. Oh, and let’s not forget the SPECTACULAR views of the Eastern Sierra and surrounding countryside. These views only get better the higher you go.

If you come to the White Mountains, bring PLENTY of water. Unless you come early in the season and can melt snow, there is NONE in the area. Also, at these kinds of altitudes, it is generally always chilly. So bring a jacket any time of the year. You may not need it at times due to the strong sun, which can make it feel FAR warmer than it really is here. Speaking of the sun, also bring sunscreen. The sun up here at 12000+ft is BRUTAL compared to sea level, and will COOK unprotected skin in short order. Long sleeves and a hat or bandana can also help protect you from the sun.

We spotted elks, deer and coyote! It was a very nice trail with a lot of wildlife.

A very fun, scenic hike with lots of wildlife (elk, deer, and coyotes) and beautiful coastal vistas. The grades are minimal and fairly far apart so this is more like a vigorous walk than a hike. Once you pass the reservoir and grove of cypress trees, the crowds thin out all the way to the tip of Tomales Point. Bring a jacket - it's always windy, especially the exposed final mile plus of the hike. No bathroom at the trailhead but there is one right below in the McClure Beach lot. Highly recommended hike !

As others have mentioned, the road to the trailhead is very rough, and getting a flat all the way up there would suck (plus it would cost a fortune). It took me about an hour and a half to get to the trailhead where I slept overnight. Sleeping overnight at elevation is essential to get acclimated. The trail from the closed gate is actually 14 miles, not 11.1. I got a bit of altitude sickness a bit at about the research station so I chilled at the station for about 20 minutes and then for another half hour at the observatory just a little ways further. I was fine after that with regard to altitude (that was after spending most of the last 4 days between 7k-12k elevation in Death Valley and Kings Canyon). The best way to prevent/combat altitude sickness is lots of water and snacking. There should be enough of your urine on that mountain for an entire weeks worth of German dungeon porn.

It was quite cold even late July, so I recommend hat and gloves for sure. Part of the trail was snowy and I got pretty bad sunburn on my face and lips from the reflection. I'm generally speaking in good shape - 29yo man, 155ln reasonably fit, and it took me 11 hours. 6am to about 5pm. I'm a slow hiker though, and take lots of breaks. Part of that is necessity but part of that is because everyone is running around like a goddamn chicken with their head cut off in the city, and then they come out here to nature where they keep running around like a goddamn chicken with its head cut off just the same, except this time in nature. You trying to make it back in time for a haircut appointment or something? Slow down, chill, and enjoy - you got nowhere to be.

This did a number on my knee and calves, coming back down. I could barely walk after I got the car and took a break. It may be the easiest 14er, but that doesn't mean it's easy!

We went here yesterday, a Sunday in August, and didn't get onto the trail until around 1pm. We started on the Purisima Creek Trail, which was entirely shaded (which we prefer on a hot day!). There weren't too many other hikers, and we didn't see any horses, although we saw plenty of evidence of them on the trail. Craig Britton is a single file path, and still mostly shaded. There are some beautiful views of the coast and you can see above the fog. Once we got to Harkins trail, we were mostly in the sun and it got pretty hot. It gets more crowded towards the parking lots, and although there were some tourists towards the end of the trail, we didn't see many other hikers during the three hours we hiked. As far as wildlife, we saw some quail, a banana slug, and some other small birds. Can't wait to do it again!

Beautiful trail. Watch out for the poison ivy

hiking
10 days ago

Wear long pants and bring a jacket if you don't want scratches on your arms and legs. Near the end of the trail, you'll be walking through some prickly brush that goes chest high (if not head high). There's definitely some steep climbs in sand, but the most tiring one is mile 6-7. Super scenic photos of the water breaking onto shore, fields full of wildflowers, and you may even see some elk!

What an amazing trail along the coast! Expect to get sand in your shoes & go through bushes. The weather was perfect, with the cool, crisp air & fog in the morning and as the fog lifted, the sun made everything so visible. Loved all the wildflowers and wildlife. But the views are to die for! It’s one of my favorite hikes yet!

hiking
10 days ago

It doesn’t get much better than this for me. I arrived by 8:45a on a Sunday and more or less had the walk out to myself. It was dense with fog so had a hazy, dreamlike feel to it. I was the only one at Tomales Point which itself is a stunning vista. There was lots of wildlife to see...sea lions, pelicans, crabs, oyster catchers, snails and gulls. By the time I turned around to walk back around 1130a the fog had cleared and the trail was pretty heavily trafficked. Because the fog had cleared though the walk back felt entirely different than the walk out. The views of the ocean and bay are terrific and seeing a herd of elk was fun. Overall a great hike.

It’s a very nice trail, but extremely tough if you don’t hike more that 5 miles. On my GPS it actually ended up being 14 miles because we did climb to the summit. If you are and experienced hiker go for it, for people like that I’m not in terrible shape but also don’t run marathons it was really tough!

hiking
15 days ago

We had a great day in the fog. I look forward to the “chill” and the fog brings it. We wanted out of the Sacramento 100 degrees that is coupled with poor air quality due to fires. Everything else was a plus, Elk, floral color everywhere. My hiking friends watched a Red Garner Snake eat a vermin.
Our time at Tamales Point was treated with Pelicans, Cormorants, Sea Gulls and friendly hikers pleased with rough waters of the Ocean and the mouth of Tamales Bay.

Challenging but manageable- just the right amount of steeps

Tonnes of fog. couldn't see the water for most of the hike. Saw some elk.

hiking
18 days ago

Arrived at 9am to get a spot in the lot and then headed up through the fog. Elk are visible along the way and congregate above the pond. Bull elk are up on the ridge. Once you get to the unmaintained portion of the trail, it turns to sand and the brush gets chest high, but it is worth the views at the end. It is usually foggy in the summer.

Arrived 7:30a on Saturday and snagged the last space in the lot, which can’t hold more than 8-10 cars. Hiked this lovely loop counter clockwise, so I was going downhill on the very steep Haskins Ridge trail. My knees don’t thank me. Did the loop in a bit over 3 hours with lots of photo stops. Lots of second growth Redwoods, ferns, and burbling creeks at the lower elevations. Sunny with views at higher elevations. Didn’t encounter very many people until the last third of the hike. Nothing spectacular, but this was an exceedingly pleasant hike.

**Found**
found a sleeping bag on the northwestern side of the mountain, in a glacial valley. Packed it out. Describe it to me and I can mail it to you. send me a message on Instagram, @sam_joe_carl

Beautiful wilderness! Spent two nights and three days. My GPS showed the final milage to be more like 43.5

Great hike, thoroughly enjoyed the entire walk except for the overgrown parts right at the beginning. Took us 2 hours to get up (I was carrying a 3 year old) and about the same to come down, only because we were looking for a bear that someone else saw on the way up. Only saw about 15 people in the 5 hours we were out so it was relatively peaceful. Highly recommend. No reason this hike should be rated as "hard" in my opinion. If I can carry a child the entire way as never be worried about my footing I'd say it should be moderate. As of right now there is a small creek at 1.6 miles in that is a good place to fill water if you are filtering, that could have saved me from carrying quite so much water. Our GPS showed 7.5 miles and my Apple watch said 7.8 miles. Seems to be a theme with alltrails... Underestimating the mileage! Great hike, though, you are sure to enjoy it!

Make sure to bring some type of insect repellent but overall very beautiful and gracious. I did bring my dog and should’ve had dog booties for her because of certain terrain. Enjoy!

hiking
22 days ago

Spectacular! Almost skipped due to trail being described as "hard" and for "expert" hikers. Good portion of the hike had shade, gradual incline until the summit which was somewhat rocky, but very doable. Lunched with butterflies on the summit. Bring water, temp was in the 80s, used all of my 32 oz.

hiking
23 days ago

This was the longest hike I’ve done in a while (9.4 miles). We saw lots of wildlife, including a coyote, tons of elk and birds. It was a good workout for me, particularly the last part that is unmaintained. The wildflowers are very overgrown and were taller than me, and it took me awhile to hike on sand. But, the views at Tomales Bluff (the end) were amazing. It had been foggy for most of our hike but cleared up right as we got there so we were able to enjoy our lunch perched on some rocks and taking in the beautiful views!

Most of the hike is in the Hood Mountain Regional Park, so if you want to bring a dog, park at Pythian and come up from the other side of the hill, just make sure to turn around once you get into Sugarloaf. All the trails on the Hood Mountain side are rougher and more challenging, while the Sugarloaf trails are a little easier and more well maintained.

Nice hike with many butterflies, birds. Went left at Deer Flat down Meridian Ridge to Bald ridge to North Peak to Summit. Looped down Juniper trail and back to Mitchell Canyon. very enjoyable day.

Nice views while hiking, however trail was not so great. Ending was terrible as it was just telephone lines and machines. Very foggy and humid throughout hike. I wouldn’t make this place a priority hike

hiking
30 days ago

Loved this hike! Very beautiful the first ten seconds you walk through a nice green area with water and awesome wildflowers!! We started our hike around 9 I would recommend a little earlier because it gets super hot but sine it’s so beautiful we pushed through. When you make it to the top the view is gorgeous you can see for miles and miles it’s really cool up there.

We hiked this trail yesterday. It took 8 of us 2 hours to the top and we trail ran down, back to the trailhead. Because of the fires, the trail is 75% sun. The dynamic change in landscape and elevation made this hike both challenging and amazing. I highly recommend it you are up for a challenge

A long hike with lots of uphill but nothing technical about the hike. We did the counter-clockwise version which was probably a mistake because the downhill is pretty tricky. Probably best to come down along the fire road. Nice views from the top. Best to go in the Spring or Fall, as Summer can be too hot.

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