Explore Summer 2018 - view hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

Summer 2018 Map
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Completed this hike yesterday and was very impressed. We did the full loop through PP and GPS'd about 14.2 miles. Bugs were manageable. Sun exposure for the first 3 ish miles out of Zig Zag something to be mindful of, especially on a hot day. Sandy trail in areas so wear your boots! And conserve energy for the climb back out to Timberline. I ID'd approximately 15 flowers/shrubs along the way. Great time!

As a follow-up to the review by PhLo S just below...my group went August 10-12. There were some flies and mosquitoes at the lower elevations, but nothing close to plague-level. As a precaution we wore long sleeve shirts and long pants, with the option to wear head nets. While hiking these precautions weren't really needed, but during rest stops the bugs can get annoying. The views at the upper elevations are amazing. This was one of the best hikes I have been on.

Did 3 days 2 nights at robin lake with my dog. We started at 7am and made it to robin by 1pm. The first 3 miles are easy with virtually no elevation gain to Hyas. The real work starts at the turn off to go up towards Tuck Lake. The grade is steep and terrain is loose dirt which makes it that much harder to get up. It was flying in my face which was irritating but Tuck was a beautiful spot. There was an FSR at tuck and robin so make sure your dog is leashed up. The hike to robin was hot and hard in the afternoon. I forgot to fill water at tuck and made a struggle to get up the last stretch so make sure you’re hydrated or it will be miserable or potentially dangerous. A couple spots involve lifting your body up boulders and steep sections of granite so keep that in mind when considering you’re hauling a 40-50lb bag. I had to boost my dog on a few rock to get her up the mountain. The views were unbelievable. It’s almost spiritual with the amount of beauty up there. The bugs weren’t bad for us, but we used a good deal of permethrin on my gear which I think helped. A ton to explore and always make sure to leave it better than you found it.

Pretty popular trail considering the amount of traffic I ran into on a weekday morning. Road conditions on the way up are fairly poor and there is a lot of rippling of the gravel. Good hike with some cool views along the way. Glad I went once but I probably wont be back for a while.

Loved this hike! Great hike for dogs too as there are lots of water spots but as others have mentioned the trail gets HOT on some sections so you’ll definitely want to bring booties for your dog if you’re not going to be off the trail by noon. It does get a little steep if you go up to the glacial lake past the high meadow - which I definitely recommend doing!

Such a beautiful hike! Make sure you go in late July, which is peak for the wildflowers.

hiking
9 days ago

Hard route out, moderate on the way back. Worth the invest in sweat and shoes filled with rock for the view and the crystal clear lake. Next time, we’ll plan and pack better to do the summit trail.

Three friends and I did an overnight along this route, staying near Goat Lake. The hike is absolutely miserable near the beginning and end due to plague-level biting flies that easily eclipse the also annoying mosquito infestation. A ways above the treeline all that junk disappears. The views and nice weather made up for the terribly buggy ascent and descent. We did the side trip up Hawkeye Point on our way back, well worth the extra effort. As the first evening approached, the clouds cleared off Mt. Adams. The view south from Goat Lake is amazing. The wildflowers were fairly abundant, especially near small streams. Keep in mind that standard insect repellent does absolutely nothing for the biting flies even if it keeps the mosquitoes from biting. Deet, Picaradin - no effect. Had I known, I would have read up on specific solutions for biting flies as they were far worse than mosquitoes. If you can tolerate wearing pants on a hot day, it will reduce the flies' annoyance at least a bit. Slapping your full body is harder, though it burns more calories. If you plan to camp, I highly recommend going on a weekday. It's a very popular and crowded trail. Maybe we saw over a hundred people total. Luckily we stayed Sunday night, so most of the weekend hikers were on their way down as we went up. If you are concerned about snow, as of August 6th there isn't any on the trail this entire loop route. There is a big, steep snow patch in the saddle going to the Hawkeye Point side trip, but there is a makeshift trail below and east of the snow to keep it safer. From Hawkeye Point we were able to see 28 goats to the northeast. Keep in mind they might be in the snow, in which case they blend in a bit. Bring a powerful lens (like 200 or 300 mm at least... aka 10x zoom+) if you want to get a decent photo of them.

Beautiful trail. Wildflowers are on their way down, but still abundant and amazing. If you choose to go toward Cirque Lake (the glacial lake just beneath Three Finger Jack), definitely bring adequate hiking shoes and poles if you have them. They will be an invaluable help. The path is loose gravel for the last 1/4 mile up to the glacial lake and on past (if you go up to the top of the crest). If you just do the loop, it’s a good climb on the first leg (to the meadow), but an easy downhill from there. Spectacular views of Three Finger Jack, Mt. Jefferson, and a few others (even 2 of the three sisters briefly). Heavily trafficked for a weekend but well worth it!
Also, no mosquitoes, but plenty of flies.

hiking
10 days ago

Such a Gorgeous hike!! No words... just go!!

the last 1 mile is straight up. safe but steep. awesome views. took my wife Robin and dog tuck on this one for sure

We planned our arrival in hopes that 830 at the trailhead would get us parking and avoid the crowds. We were right and wrong at the same time. The trailheads at West Parking and Berry Patch were both packed, but as it turned out, it was mostly day hikers.

The trail condition heading up Snowgrass Trail (We did the loop counter clock wise) was in great condition, and the bugs were only bugging us if we stopped. We were hiking with two dogs, and the bugs were more interested in them than us.

There were plenty of people on the trail, but almost all of them were day hikers in large groups. We saw maybe 5-6 backpacking groups (2-4 people) the entire way up. We stopped and ate lunch at Snowgrass before pushing on towards Goat Lake, where we intended to set up camp. The bugs were worse up in snow grass flat, but not unbearable and as the valley opened up the views made us completely forget it.

We ended up deciding to make camp about a mile shy of Goat Lake. I'm not one for crowds, and everyone was headed up there and we were early on the trail for backpackers. It ended up being a great call, as we found a nice shaded spot a little off the trail with a perfectly framed view of Mt. Adams and easy access to fresh water. Through my telephoto later that evening, I counted over 15 tents in the vicinity of Goat Lake.

The next day, we continued the loop, stopping for pictures and to let the pups play in the snow at Goat Lake.

The trail from a mile prior to Goat Lake, and about 3 miles after it is absolutely beautiful, but a little precarious for novice hikers, hikers with inexperienced dogs, and children. The drop offs exceed 1000 feet in places, and while the path is mostly in wonderful condition, there are sections that require a little more concentration, and they generally match up with those steep drop offs. Just a thought to consider when deciding how best to tackle this loop, or whether to just do an out and back on Snowgrass.

After crossing the ridge into Jordan Basin and following the long ridge-hugging trail down into the treeline, the trail slowly widens, the canopy thickens and despite a last minute climb before the 1.8 mile elevator descent to parking, the trail was very enjoyable.

Water is pretty available the whole loop, but the wooded section on the western part of the loop has only one good creek access, and the rest of the water is available above the tree line. Jordan Basin has a wide, cool stream to fill up in before your descent. We packed too much water in, considering the availability of fresh water throughout the hike.

For a weekend backpacking trip on this trail, I was pleasantly surprised at the lack of crowds, availability of camp sites and the friendliness of everyone on the trail. There were lots of dogs, lots of families with young kids and hikers of all ages on the trail.

This is a beautiful scenic trail. Unfortunately I ran out of gas about one half mile before Goat Lake. The views are amazing but I ended at 12 miles which was too much for me to day hike. I will have to try it again another day. A side note, the biting flies are insane, bring lots of repellent or you will be miserable.

18.07.28 (Overnight)
The trail itself is in good shape and the spectacular views begin around 5 miles in. The trail was very busy, but not excessively so.
Bugs were an absolute horror until you get above the treeline, to the degree that even my 2 dogs were actually groaning and thrashing around in frustration whenever we stopped for water.
The lake is 90% frozen and there was still snow around Goat Lake, but solid ground could be found for tents. However, there were easily >30 tents crammed throughout the vicinity and campfires were in use by some groups despite very visible signage stating this was prohibited. In short, it was a zoo.
The gross misconduct by overnighters and general overuse of the area will unfortunately keep me away. Please, be respectful when you enjoy these beautiful trails.

Really fun trail with an amazing view of mountains and goats! Some things to keep in mind though:
- the sandy trail gets really hot really fast so if you have a pup you should probably be done by noon to avoid burnt paws (It’s about 3.5 hour hike with breaks and the meadow trip)
- the bugs come with the afternoon heat (bring spray)
- road is a little rough coming in; definitely manageable in most cars but just be ready for it!

Overall is a great hike for when you are in the area!

backpacking
16 days ago

July - Mid Summer

The hike to mirror lake, as well as the summit, offers some of the best alpine views I’ve ever seen with my own two eyes.

There are a lot of people on this trail though. The parking area was so packed we had to park on the road. Finding a campsite wasn’t too difficult (and we found a decent site), but we had quite a few neighbors. We also passed several people, dogs and horses on the trail.

Didn’t really see in wildlife.

The trail itself isn’t too difficult. It is very well maintained, and very easy to find your way to the basin. The beginning section is probably the most difficult, as you do most of your accent there until you reach the upper valley. Going to the summit makes for a great day hike, but you gain about 2000 feet in less than 3 miles.

There is a toilet at the parking area. Parking costs $5 per day, and a wilderness permit is required (free at trailhead). Also make sure you read the regulations as campfires are prohibited within 1/4 of a mile from many of the lakes in the basin.

Overall a beautiful trip, If a little overcrowded. Would recommend doing in the off season to avoid the crowd.

The drive up in my opinion will need an SUV and I might need to get new suspension after that road. But it was a great hike! If you are wanting to see Cirque Lake, I suggest you leave your packs down in the meadow. That part of the trail is difficult. But as my daughter said..”we did it”. Definitely would recommend!

Amazing! Make sure your dog has booties if it’s hot. Just went two days ago and there are no mosquitoes.

backpacking
18 days ago

This is AMAZING! It is quite the trek, we went to Robins lake in one day-left about 930am and made it to Robins lake about 5pm. There is a sign to turn off for the lakes. From there, it goes right up to Tuck for 1.1 miles (feels like more). Getting up to Robins is the trick. We missed the trail and nearly scrambled the 1.5 miles to Robins lake. Most of the reviews say "follow the cairns", we followed the rock structures. and even going off path we found our way to the top.

To get to Robins Lake, go to the right of Tuck and the rock structures start immediately. Seriously, follow these and even if you miss the "right path" these get you to the top. Really tough hikee, but really worth it.

One of my favorite backpacking trips. The last two miles to tuck lake is really really hard but take your time and you'll get there :) its very worth it. Amazing views from up there of other mountains and lakes and the hike up to Robin lakes took us about 30min so that's worth checking out too. Really diverse terrain and I love the pristine forest by the trailhead. We saw some airforce training or whatnot and the pilots blast by doing crazy flips. Truly a wonderful trip.

Beautiful hike with wildflowers, butterflies, and beautiful alpine scenery. The mosquitos and flies weren’t that bad, I got maybe 4-5 bites. A lot of fun optional hikes to the glacial pool, upper meadow, and Wasco Lake. There are several dispersed campsites with fire rings on little side trails when you turn off the loop towards 3FJ. Over half of the loop hike is exposed and gets hot in the direct sunlight. The trail gets busy with dayhikers, peak hours seems to be 11-2.

Beautiful trip up to some incredible scenery. For those waiting for the big wild-flower blooms, they are starting to happen but not quite there yet. No snow on the trail until you hit the snow fields above the tree line. Lots of people in the snow grass flats area up to Old Snowy. Not the place to go if you want to get away from it all (at least on the weekend). Views are spectacular as you head toward the summit of Old Snowy. Route was clear all the way with a bit of scrambling as you reach the summit.

absolutely gorgeous hike. the mile and a half or so uphill is definitely a workout, especially if you get swarmed by insects like I did (bring bugspray) but once you hit the top and it levels out to a view of south sister, you forget about all that cardio and get energized toward the lake. the lake is a beautiful place to enjoy lunch or a break, make sure to tread lightly. there are overnight camping spots at the lake. it was so gorgeous there we actually considered going back down to get our camping gear to bring back up for the night. we didnt, but will next time. a timeless hike, really. you could base camp at the lake to summit south sister pretty easily, too.

The wild flowers are in full bloom and smell amazing...
best hike yet...if you can hike past the glacier to the viewpoint ..the very top ...you will not be disappointed!

backpacking
24 days ago

Great hike. Wild flowers and butterflies abounded. We took our time and did it in three days hiking counter clockwise, Tuesday thru Thursday. First night at Jack Lake. Kind of ok for swimming, doesn’t get deep enough and you sink down to mid calf level in the muck. As stated previously it is very windy and the fine silt blows right into your tent through the mesh. Best to camp back by the parking lot in one of the spots with a picnic table. More protected. Day two Canyon Creek Meadows was amazing. This made it worth every dusty hot step we had to take getting there. We saw four mountain goats-including a mom with her baby. The glacial tarn is beautiful and the views restorative. Second night at Wasco Lake. Mosquitoes weren’t too bad, and we were the only ones there. Great Lake to swim in-not too cold-gets deep quickly. Really enjoyed our afternoon lazing in the sun after our swim.
Hiked out on day three. On this portion of the trail the mosquitos we’re bothersome whenever we stopped for a snack or rest. If you bring your dog-definitely get booties to protect their paws. We met one poor dog at 2:00 p.m. near the end of the trail, and it was hiding in the bushes trying to get away from the heat and hot sandy trail...I hope the owners turned back, as they were just heading out for Wasco Lake.

This may be long... I went backpacking with a friend and stayed in the upper meadow. We had read reviews regarding the heat and dogs and since I had mine we decided to get there early. We left the parking lot at 10:30 on the Jack Creek trail headand though it was only in the 70’s the direct sunlight was blazing hot. The first part of the trail has little to no shade which made it a little tough for the pup. He had some water and kept on truckin.’ At the junction you can take the old summit trail to the right or the canyon creek/glacier trail to the left. We chose left. It’s a gradual incline with only one little lake as a water source if you should need it. Once you reach the top it gradually turns in to lush forest and is a nice reprieve. After another 20 or so minutes of hiking we met another junction that leads to a one way trail (which meets up with summit to make a loop) or the meadows trail on the left. This is where you meet up with canyon creek and get a real idea of how beautiful the area is. The wildflowers are in full bloom and the view of 3 Fingered Jack is epic. It’s a great stopping point to refill water and eat a snack. TONS of butterflies and unfortunately mosquitos. Just bring some spray and you’ll be ok! We saw a spot near the junction that looked like others had camped at. Please be aware that this is wilderness and it is a fineable offense to camp/have a fire within 100 feet of a water source! We went to check out the glacier trail. There will be a sign that says trail not ma brained but it really seemed so to us. You will walk through some truly Georgia meadow with streams veining the landscape everywhere. We camped just before the real upper meadow. And hiked the glacier when the sun was going down. The meadow is beautiful and the glacier lake is so pretty. Be advised that it is a rocky steep ascent and those rocks are quite loose! The view is beautiful. Here you can see some of the surrounding mountains. We did not climb all the way up as we were quite hungry. I would like to reiterate that the mosquitos are BAD. We ate later than we should have and went to hang our food for the night. While there we heard a very close almost gagging growl noise that scared the crap out of us. We couldn’t see what it was so we backed away slowly and headed back to camp. There were some deer that tried to come up to the camp and made no moves when we made a ruckus (in case we potentially encountered a bear). We went to sleep and had no problems. The next day we hiked up to wasco lake. We went early and the sun was quite hot still! BRING DOG BOOTIES. I cannot stress this enough. Wasco lake is definitely worth the hike! There is no shade at the junction but the creeks follows the one way trail and it’s easy to refill. There’s no shade until you walk at least half way around the lake. It’s not as silty as you may guess and it’s the perfect temperature for a dip. We saw some fish jump out of the water and a curious deer. My takeaways are really bring some mesquite repellent, bring dog booties if it’s mildly hot and bring layers. It’s hot but the temp could drop considerably over night or become windy. One other thing to consider for hot weather: coming from the trailhead you can take the old summit trail which goes through quit a bit of burnt forest and is a bit longer BUT you will run into the creek sooner than if you take the glacier trail. Glacier trail is shorter but you’ll hit some shade faster than old summit. This was my first backpacking trip and I plan on doing it again!!

What a spectacular hike! Lots of wildflowers and millions of butterflies. The color of the lake at the base of Three Fingered Jack was unreal. Don't use Google maps for directions. Trust your trail book.

Did this two and a half day hike several years ago in August. It can be completed quicker but why? Very hot but wandering in and out of the evergreen forests made for mostly pleasant times Several cold water springs are spaced out just right. Wildlife and scenery every day makes it very interesting. The mouth of the volcano is breathtaking. Trails are well marked on this moderate hiking experience. Take a side route to Johnson’s Ridge and the national monument to learn about the pre, active, and post activity the Mountain put on display. RIP Harry Truman on this mountain of adventure.

backpacking
28 days ago

Beautiful views and great swimming lakes! We hiked it clockwise spending the first night at Wasco lake and the second night at Square lake. Overall a great hike but be prepared for HOT sandy trails that will burn dog's feet on hot days (it was 95 degF). Bring gators for sand. 90% of this hike is in the burn/full sun, only 10% of this hike is in the shade. Plenty of mosquitoes on the PCT between Santiam pass and Wasco lake. There's not much water between Santiam pass and Koko lake so bring a lot of water or fill up when you can. Wasco lake was crowded with hikers and mosquitoes. Square lake was awesome with no people and few mosquitoes! I'd recommend this hike, especially on days cooler than 90 degF and after mosquito season is over!

backpacking
28 days ago

We backpacked in and spent the night in the upper meadow. It was gorgeous! We were there 7/14-7/15 and saw lots of goats on both days. There were a few babies too! The flowers were beautiful and so fragrant. This is going on the list to do every year.

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