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Completed same day on October 17th. Started at 0315 Took 11.5 hours. Great conditions - no winds the entire time. Incredibly cold in early morning while dark - camelbak froze many times. Required lots of layers. Once the sun same out a t-shirt was fine. Snow / ice at top of switchbacks and to summit. We wore microspikes down but wasn’t needed on way up. Could have been done entirely without spikes. Long day but rewarding.

My fiancé and I went yesterday! It was absolutely breathtaking! We also brought our 3 month old daughter with us in a baby carrier so the hike was a little bit difficult but definitely worth it! Started the hike around 1100 and ended up at the lake around 230 ish and took us a little less the 3 hours to get back down. Beyond beautiful!

Beautiful views and well worth the climb. Lakes are beautiful, and what you see in the pictures is what you see in real life. I want to go back and hike to the glacier one day.

Speechless. Exactly how it left us. Big Pine Lakes is absolutely breathtaking. By far one of the most beautiful places we’ve hiked. The trail is rated moderate but I will be honest when I say that this trail is more on the difficult end. Just my opinion. The hike is mostly incline and over 5-6 miles to the first lake. Completely worth it though. Very doable and many stop areas along the way. We saw deer and the fall leaves. Not to mention the beautiful scenery. We only went to lake two and it took us a total of 6hrs. We also stopped and took pictures in many places so that’s why it took a bit longer.

Wonderful day hike! You get a real mixed bag of views. The lakes and peaks are amazing! The trail is in great shape. It is getting cold (26 at 7:30am) and there is a small amount of ice on the upper switch backs but very doable. And hitting the pass is well worth the work!!

Did this hike on October 6 2018. It snowed before, during, and after. We lucked out and got clear skys at the summit. Summited around 11:00am passed tons of people that turned around because it was too sketchy as it was icy and cold. I didn't have spikes or crampons so was super bummed as I didn't think I had a prayer to make it. The trail was icy and slippery but it wasn't like you were going to fall to your death if you slipped and fell. It was easy to spot the icy areas and I just used the trekking poles and took my time.

hiking
12 days ago

A wonder-filled hike with a little bit of everything: 5 lakes in the loop, waterfalls and streams, enough elevation gain to make it challenging and even more interesting, and plenty of places to stop and enjoy. This hike is easily one of my favorites, great for a day or a week. Did it a month ago and had to make sure I reviewed it.

backpacking
12 days ago

This was a great hike- planned on two nights but a snow system was a little heavier than we planned for so called it and headed back down.

Very few people on the trail on Friday- no more than a half a dozen going up and down the entire time. Saturday was a little heavier, but not a problem overall. Co-hiker was not ready for much more than Lake 1, but looking forward to the full loop and Palisade next time.

heading this Friday. and it's going to be our second trip. got to love bishop pass.

Mount Whitney Trail
03 OCT 2018, Wednesday

I hiked from Whitney Portal Trailhead to within three-quarters of a mile of the Summit and back--about 20 miles. I did not reach the Summit, unfortunately. Sound judgement led me to turn back and quickly descend, due to a sudden snow and lightning storm. Lots of wind and falling snow (corn snow?) made footing a challenge, especially between Keeler Needle and Trail Crest.

Started my hike at 3:30am under a clear sky. Lots of stars in the sky, those first three hours. Beautiful sunrise and fantastic views. It was sunny and pleasant when ascending the 97 switchbacks. That morning, the trail was clear of ice most of the way, with some ice present on the highest one-third of the switchbacks. I put yak traks on my boots and found them helpful, especially considering what was to come that afternoon.

Clouds started to build just before noon. By 12:30pm the sky darkened and snow began to fall, so I decided to turn back. By 12;45pm, snow and wind were intense as I descended from Keeler Needle to Trail Crest and then down the 97 switchbacks. Heavy snow continued to fall as I hiked through Trail Camp, through Outpost Camp and halfway to Lone Pine Lake. The wind howled and blew the snow sideways.

Lightning all around. While descending from Trail Crest and through the 97 switchbacks, clearly visible lighting bolts crossed the sky. I hiked through heavy snowfall, instantaneous thunder and much too close views of lightning veins for the hour it took to descend the switchbacks. I dove to the ground a couple of times, out of some kind of instinctive survival reaction. There's no place safe to take shelter from lightning anywhere between the base of the 97 switchbacks and the Summit. Keep in mind, the air is very thin above 13,000 feet and it will take you longer than you think to get from point A then to B and to C.

There were a few hikers ahead of me who were within a half mile or so of the Summit, just prior to the moment I decided to turn around and descend. I hope and pray they each made a safe return home.

Be prepared, if attempting Mt. Whitney during the month of October. I carried a very heavy day-pack containing extra water- and wind-proof clothing, two wool head coverings, extra food and water, an extra headlamp and batteries, etc... My body temperature remained warm, I was hydrated and had the energy to extract myself from a "not good" situation.

Even though I didn't reach the Summit, I'm good with it.

Oct 2, 2018, windy and snow storm above 3800m.
I lost my way off the trail before 99 switches simply following other two climbers ahead. It is extremely dangerous to climb short-cut of the switches, because the stone slope up to the top is too loosen to fall in a snowy day together with stones! It took me two extra hours to cut back to the switches safely using All Trail map, but fail to the summit before deadline for closed time.
I will come back to Mt Whitney because The Mountain is there!
Thanks a lot to my son and daughter in law, and my wife for their understanding and support.

17 days ago

Summit date: 10/1/2018

Langley is a test of your commitment. As a ‘fourteener’ there’s not a whole lot to look at and sometimes it feels like a barren moon surface. BUT, it’s a great test of stamina, and anything but boring and much less travelled than Whitney...so if you enjoy solitude and semi private trail blazing, give Langley a try!

We hiked in from Horseshoe Camping Grounds to Cottonwood Lake #3 and setup base camp. The hike was 8 miles, 1,400 ft elevation gain and took about 6 hours with full pack. .

Next day we set out for the summit under great weather conditions. From Cottonwood Lake #3 via Old Army Pass and back to camp for a round tip of 10.5 miles, roughly 10 hours with a 3,100 ft elevation gain. The trails are hard to follow on the way up once you emerge from Old Army rim, the elevation gain continuous and unrelenting. Follow the cairns, it’s your best bet. Make sure you travel light and keep your pack under 20 lbs or under if possible and do your best to take 3 liters of water to hydrate. Weather rolled in and we descended quickly to miss cloud cover and the first new storm system for Souther Sierra’s. By the time we left the next day, rain was coming down moderately with winds picking up.

The hike out of the lakes is always a butt kicker the next day after the summit, so rest up! Make sure to remember which lot you parked in...we had to play ‘find the car’ on the return as I originally thought we parked at the Cottonwood Lakes campsite! After a tough summit and long hike back, looking for your car weighed down with a full pack is not what you want to do.

All-in-all, Langley is a moderate-to-hard summit with great views of Kings Canyon and the Sierra’s Camping out in the Cottonwoods doesn’t get much better.

hiking
18 days ago

Langley is kind of a grind and not really that interesting. Definitely wide panoramic views at the top though.

The standout on this walk are the lakes. I was at Rae Lakes just the weekend before and these hands down blow it away.

Skip the grind and just spend some time at the lakes!

This trail is at high altitude and there is a gain of 3000+ft. But it is gradual which makes it very possible for just about anyone with enough time to enjoy. The trail is exposed to the elements for the first 2 miles so a 6-7am start is recommended. On the trail I saw, 8 yr old kids with backpacking gear hitting it strong, a three legged dog running ahead of his crew, a couple of men over 250lbs, and if I had my babies in my backpack, it wouldn’t have stopped me from enjoying this AMAZING trail. The beauty about this trail is that there is so much to enjoy along the way. The creek provides so many places to enjoy a break, a dip, or whatever. Whether you do the “whole loop” or not, it shouldn’t matter. Don’t ever let anyone tell you what you can or cannot hike period. Walk the whole thing up to Canada or walk up 300ft, at least you got outside. Enjoy my friends. This is an incredible hike. Bring at least 1.5 liters if you don’t drink much like myself but much more if you have littles. Maybe take a hammock too.

hiking
18 days ago

Great hike, clean air clean trail amazing views

My. Whitney, CA
20 September 2018

Success!!!

Our group of 10 met up in Lone Pine, CA on September 18th. We came from Virginia, Texas, Pennslyvania, Kentucky, Tennessee & Arizona. Two were related, some were old friends, some were new friends, and some had never met. Barry from Orange County join our group last, at 2:00am on the 20th, and we were stronger for his company.

I had been invited at the last minute, to fill a vacancy. 53 years old, not a hiker, and certainly not in pristine shape, but the mind was willing. We’d find out if the body could keep up.

Obersvations: 1 - Spectacular scenery and views. 2 - I overestimated my ability, and underestimated the mountain. 3 - The lack of Oxygen is real. 4 - The 99 switchbacks are harsh. 5 - The last 1.9 miles is the longest ever walked. 6 - Coming down is every bit as difficult as going up. Finally, and most importantly 7 - I wouldn’t have made it without the help, support, advice and encouragement of friends, acquaintances and strangers alike.

We left the Portal as a group at 2:00am, drowsy, happy and excited. We summitted independently, as pairs and in small groups, to the cheers of those in our group who had reached before us, as well as people we had never met. I summitted at noon (last of my group) as the final pair with a true friend who waited an hour for me to start his final two miles with me. We were all back at the Portal by 7:55pm, again, with me in the last pair, and the rest of the group cheering on our group achievement. 23.4 miles, 18 hours, 78,000 steps. Almost 6,000 feet up... and then down. A very long day indeed.

Jeff, Cindy, Nicki, Amber, Katie, Amay, Joe, Jenn, Summer, Barry & Scott. 11 started, 11 summitted and 11 finished.

We had no injuries, and only minor setbacks. We are all tremendously thankful for that.

As one of my ‘new’ friends just pointed out, a week ago we were on top of that granite rock. Today we’re all spread out across this great country. I count this as one of the greatest personal accomplishments of my life (children, marriage notwithstanding). Not necessarily summitting, but being a part of an amazing group of people who came together to reach new heights, and left richer for the experience and the friendships gained.

Carpe Diem

Absolutely beautiful! Perfect for a day hike, completed within 10hours (12 hours if my chit-chat time at the summit is added). Started at 01:25am and made it up all the switchbacks by 06:08am, saw one of the most beautiful sunrises!!!
Food wise, I carb-loaded the day before (around 2-3pm). I ate a banana and a little of trail mix up the summit and ate a meal after completing the hike. Carb loading the day before and going in a fasted state was probably my best decision, I had a ton of energy and did not feel nauseous. I only needed about 1.5L of water total (but I did hike most of the trail during night).
ALSO, thank you whoever takes care of the trail, during full moon (as it was last night) I did not even need to use the headlamp to find my way up.

My son and I drove out from LA to Lone Pine Friday morning, retrieved passes after 2pm (many were available) and checked into a hotel.

Sat 3am the journey commenced and approx 7 hrs later we hit the summit shortly after 10am. High winds and cold temps up top made clothing options crucial. Glad as well that w had altitude meds (diamox) so as to avoid AMS. (No acclimation)

The descent was fun and enjoyable since anything below the 99 switchbacks was dark on the way up. We watered up at Trail Head camp, cooked a nice “campers stew” about halfway down just past Outpost Camp, then cruised the final 6 mi. We were in the car by 5pm so all in all including stops a 14 hr journey.

The ride home was a breeze. The journey nothing less than epic. We both vow to return - Whitney is a beast but beautiful !

The views are nothing to brag about. This hike was more mentally demanding than it is physically. The sad part is that I didn't even get to enjoy getting to the top because my first thought was that I have at least another 6 hours to retrace every step in order to get off this mountain. If you are doing this as a dayhike, make sure to set a schedule to get enough carbs. We set a schedule to eat energy chews or gels every hour, which we were doing well with until we reached Trail Crest. Perhaps it was the lack of oxygen but we couldn't get ourselves to eat after that. On the way back down, I crashed hard at around Trail Crest. Finally forced myself to eat some energy chews and within 10 minutes I was feeling a lot more energetic. We had Clif Bloks with caffeine and Honey Badger Gingsting gels which were both lifesavers.

hard ...but amazing

First summited on my 60th birthday, as a dayhike. 22 hours, exhausted but no blisters or other injuries. Made it my annual thing. 2 nights at the portal campground, short hikes to Lone Pine Lake helps keep the altitude sickness at bay. Always an enjoyable trek, hope one day to score an overnight pass. Bucket list item. Beware the marmots!

Experience of a lifetime, thanks to all the people who encourage me to do this, Angel, Dan, Don and my wife. By far the hardest hike I’ve ever done
But we reached the summit, and I’m blessed beyond words

I finally summited this beautiful beast of a peak 9/22. Breathtakingly clear, beautiful weather. Got lucky on an unclaimed permit and ran through the gamut. Well worth the second attempt. From Outpost camp to summit and back - 16 miles, 13 hours. Hiked out the next day.

Go prepared though. If I can impart anything it is this: hope for the best but plan to cover your backside in case things go sideways. She’s popular but she is not safe. I watched someone get airlifted off the summit when he was caught up there with exhaustion and hypothermia. Take extra clothing, a water filter, extra food and electrolytes even if you’re day-hiking.

Wow what a beast. Beautiful. Raw. Unforgiving. Warrior creators. Memory of a lifetime.

backpacking
26 days ago

We did AP more or less as shown on this map as a 3 day trip, camping 2 nights at lake 3 (9/20-9/21). The AP trail is shorter with less elevation gain than NAP. Not a mistake. Three days was a relatively relaxed way to go, but even so, the summit hike was not easy. We took a more boldery rout to the summit on the final section, skipping some of the deep sand if you followed the big cairns all the way up. This had its own challenges though - and we did follow the cairns on the way down. We saw four bighorn sheep on the the way back, and marmots here and there, sunbathing on the rocks. It was great to be back to camp on day 2 with plenty of time for a chilly plunge in the lake and to enjoy the afternoon and evening rather than packing up and slogging it back to the parking lot. Overall a great trip!

hiking
26 days ago

Did this hike on Sept 3, 2018. It was one of the most picturesque hikes I’ve ever done. First and Second Lake were breathtakingly beautiful. Hubby and I turned around at Second Lake because storm clouds were headed our way and we didn’t want to hike back down in the rain in the dark. A few of our friends were able to get camping permits and stayed overnight to climb Temple Crag. They got up 6 pitches and came back down because storm clouds were approaching. Can’t wait to come back.

All fails at its best....posting reviews from people that didnt do the hike......turning back at lake 2 is
not what this hike is about....if you dont do the hike don't comment.....difference between turning back at lake 2 and completing the hike is about 1400 feet elevation gain....not for kids or quiters....if you do the hike, one of the best in the Eastern Sierra, but probably should be rated "hard" as you can see most people don't complete the hike.

Great hike, spectacular views. Cold at night and in the morning. No ice or snow yet, as of 9/22/18. Tough finish to the top with sinking sand and small gravel. Saw a coyote, marmots and deer. But no big horn sheep (boo) and no bears (phew.) Completed in 13 hours, would do it in two or three days next time, to take in all the beauty this hike has. Well worth it.

Hiked to the glacier from 3rd lake on a recent backpacking trip in late August. We did not anticipate the amount of bouldering required at the last leg toward the glacier. At this point, the trail is no longer marked besides some cairns so be sure pay attention on your route so you can return the way you came. Be cautious following the rock cairns as people have put them off trail and we made the mistake of following some to basically a very steep rocky slope that my husband and I did not feel comfortable descending. Very easy to get off trail heading back down from the bouldering section so pay attention!! :) Otherwise, a wonderful hike with an amazing reward at the end. The glacier was stunning and a great back drop for a snack before heading back.

Group of 7 of us hiked on Sep 15, 2018. Started on the trail at about 1:15am and spent about 21+ hours. It is a challenging hike, both up and down. But it is well marked and you will have your destination (hut at the summit) in sight for a majority of the hike. We encountered strong wind gusts all the way up which made it a bit more challenging. Break the hike into five sections and should be less taxing mentally, section 1: trail head to lone pine lake, section 2: lone pine lake to outpost camp, section 3: outpost camp to trail camp, section 4: trail camp to trail crest and section 5: trail crest to the summit. Section 4 with the 99 switchbacks and Section 5 with the windows were the most challenging parts of the hike. Hiking in the dark with headlamps was no issue.

All in all, an awesome hike and highly recommend it. Happy trails!

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