Explore MA, Local - view hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

MA, Local Map
VIEW FULL MAP

Did more than loop. Challenging following markers and elevation landed up being more than I thought.

Did this in early March with plenty of snow and ice on the northern slopes. Stunning views of the basalt outcroppings and Easthampton beyond. Lots of history for those interested. The ghost of a ski mountain, a plane crash, and a botched horse cremation are just the beginning! Easy hike for the whole family, a waterbottle each. Steep at each end but mostly flat up along the ridge.

nice place easy walk to the falls . go during rainy period . the more water ,the better the falls looks .

If your looking for a workout look no further. Started at Holyoke range state park and trekked to mt. Holyoke in Skinner state park across Seven sisters ect. Did hike early Nov. found the trail to be quiet and challenging with leaves and wet terrain. I loved it. I’m a hiker who likes to make good time. My poles were a true asset. Took me 5 hrs for the 11.5. Trails are marked well. Views are mediocre to be honest. But the challenge is worth it.

If you want an interesting hike and only have a couple of hours this is worth your time

1 month ago

Very beautiful scenery! Hard hike but sooooo worth the view and a great adventure to explore the outdoors! Love this trail! It’s challenging!

easy hike

A hidden gem of a trail!

Great hike with the kids.

2 months ago

many, if even existing, waterbars poorly maintained. with heavy rain the day before the trail was more of a river than trail. enjoyable otherwise.

Very good. Reading the history of the arches really helps to understand the walk

Difficult to follow after the peak going white to orange. Started down to the right after the viewpoint but was able to correct with the app. I met a couple who didn’t have the app and they didn’t make it to the horse cave. Great view at the top. Lots of downed beech trees along the trail.

I had heard about the arches for years but never got around to seeing what the whole deal was. Got out of work today and decided to head over and glad I did. The trail is nothing special, follows a dirt/stone road for a while then goes up into the woods and kinda follows the road as you see it at times just down the hill. Due to the live tracks in the area, it is necessary to use the trail but at points you can still use, what I'm guessing was an access or fire road at one time, not really sure. Stay on the path and you'll be fine getting there. It does have some interesting point like the steel girder walking bridge you have to go over. Eventually, you get back to the "road" and it ascends a bit. You reach a point where it's left or right and don't worry, there is one of those glass enclosures which has the history of the arches so you'll know you're where you want to be. To the left is one of the arches, hard to tell even as you're standing on top of it but be careful and look over and you'll see the thing, it is pretty cool. I went across the arch then climbed down the embankment a bit to take some shots and then went back up and back to the trail sign. I read the history and it has a map of what you might see near it. At this point, you can leave and go right back to the trailhead or continue on straight, which I did. Until you actually realize that you're on an old railroad trail, you're thinking you're just on a hike but while walking this way, you can see the stone retaining wall and up further, look at the sides, they blew out this area with black powder to swath a path for the train. It's really pretty cool what they did. Continue a little further and you've reached the second arch. Just be careful, no railings and steep, you slip you're gone. Anyway, just cross the bridge and on the left you'll see a dirt walkway down. It's a little steep but worth it to catch some of the awesomeness of the arch, just amazing. One arch is 65 feet, the other 70 I believe. The second one I think is the tallest but not positive. Take some pictures and remember when this was actually made and where it is!

Fun hike that can be out and back (if you spot cars) or a loop. I’ve done both and the change in elevation gain gets old around the 7th or 8th mile. I prefer to start from the Summit House and hike east. I think it’s a little easier on the knees that way. No legal place to camp, but it’s great to finish the hike under the stars. Just be careful heading down Bare mountain. For the ambitious you can add on Norwottuck to make it a longer hike.

Couldn't find anything on AllTrails for section 5 only of the New England Trail/Metacomet Monadnock trail and was luckily able to record my trip with the Mt. Tom traverse section. I got off trail about a mile in. Had my head down I guess and kept going when I should have veered slightly left. You'll see around the 1 mile mark in my map where I went down and decided to come back instead of choosing a shorter route to get back on it. Still, my total distance said 5.6 miles. The sign for this section at the beginning said 5.7 miles total so I don't know if that is wrong or the AllTrails app. At this one mile mark, it goes down the hill and on top of loose stone, a section which you need to be sure where you're stepping and if you have any sort of walking issues, I suggest don't go down but keep going straight at the "Y" where you can go left and then left again which at this point is an old fire road I think. It is much easier and it will bring you to the MM trail once again. You can see the blue dotted line on my map. It's at the beginning of the Hellgate Trail and you could go up that back to the MM trail but you'd be missing a lot. There are some nice views from the cliffs you are walking across in this section. The trail as a whole is not that difficult. There are a few spots where you have to go up but nothing crazy. I suggest starting on the Rt. 202 trailhead entrance which is the southern end of this section. A nice day overall, sunny but not crazy hot. It'll take a few hours if you're just taking your time like I normally do. I am not out here to rush but instead enjoy the outdoors.

hiking
3 months ago

Definitely one of my top three hikes so far. There are a few things that need clarification. The trail description says that it's a 4.8 loop and further down it says that it's 2.4 miles to the Sperry Rd campgrounds and another 1.7 to the summit. My math puts that at 4.1 miles just to the summit and 8.2 miles total as an out and back. My legs and the rest of my body concurs. We clocked in at just around 10 miles total for both sections of the Hopper Trail.

As the description states, there are two sections of the trail, but it's a little confusing. The trail takes you to Sperry Rd where it seemingly ends. Here you can find several hike-in campsites, composting privies, an unmanned ranger station, and water spigots. Going left at the trail junction and following Sperry Rd a short distance will bring you to the upper Hopper Trail on the left. Taking a right on Sperry Rd leads you past the bathrooms and on to Stony Ledge overlook with scenic views.

The upper section of Hopper Trail takes you across sections of the auto road and links up with the Overlook trail and the Appalachian trail where the blazes change from blue to white. The trail leads past a beautiful pond with an outbuilding, then a short distance to the summit where the views are spectacular. The war memorial has an observation tower with 360 degree views of the area. Bascom Lodge has restrooms, a small gift shop, a restaurant and accommodations. We retraced our steps back down to the Hopper Rd trailhead.

To reiterate, Hopper Trail has two sections, it doesn't end at Sperry Rd, and it is close to a 9 mile out and back trail, not a 4.8 mile loop.

Signage is good. Trails are well marked. I recommend printing out a map to bring along. There were no maps at the kiosks and cell reception was good, but spotty at times.

The scenery was beautiful. We had the trail mostly to ourselves until the upper Hopper portion. I recommend walking approximately 1000 yards onto the Haley Farm trail at either the beginning or end of your hike to see the "Hopper" (the nickname for the valley). While on the trail you really don't see or realize the valley in which you're hiking along.

We had around 3400' in elevation gain, and I personally rate it as hard. Overall, it took us around 5 1/2 hours to hike it.

Definitely worth the drive from wherever you are to hike Massachusetts' highest peak.

beautiful scenic trail!

Wasnt a bad trail. was foggy so views were bad. otherwise would have a bad view. summit was marked by cairn, with some decent outlooks along the way.

hiking
4 months ago

Nice trail to take from the walk in campsites. Easy to hike and some cool scenery a long the way, but some sections are close to the road with some confusing signage occasionally. The observation tower is nice at the top, but the peak is going to pretty much always be crowded. Always nice to have ice cream or lunch at the top though :)

Great hike. Very well marked. Very shady but very buggy. Bring bug spray

hiking
4 months ago

This is one of my favorite hike in the Quabbin Reservoir. It is a short hike so on my last trip I extend it and we walk all the way to Greenwich Plains Road simply by following the Quabbin Dike Road to the end.

The view of the Quabbin reservoir from this spot is simply breathtaking. It is such a peaceful place that is sure to refresh and rejuvenate.

The description of the trail is wrong. Just a minute or two after crossing the brook, turn left onto the "Memorial Trail," which has three viewpoints as it works its way clockwise. After the third vista, turn LEFT onto the Mica Mine Road connector, then just a short ways down the road bear right onto the Observation Hill Rd. You don't have to go to the end of that road, either, as 20min or so down there's a clearly marked Conservation Corps trail on the right that connects to the Falls Rd. through the woods...much more pleasant for hikers.

hiking
4 months ago

Nice incline, but be aware that this does not lead all the way to the summit—that’s another few miles after the end of this trail.

Such a beautiful hike. I climbed up to the peak and it was definitely rewarding. I say “climbed” because I am short and it was rocky which meant I had to crawl up some rocky surfaces.

hiking
5 months ago

The majority of the trail is well-marked and fairly easy to navigate. If you want to see the waterfall, you need to take a side trail that is located about half a mile up the start of the main trail. Fairly far into our hike, we got to the view points, which were were stunning.

As others have noted, there are two bridges that make it easy for a dog to catch their paw in the holes. I carried my 60 lb dog over both. They're pretty short bridges, so that was doable.

Shortly after the view points, we unintentionally got off the trail (it didn't appear there was anywhere else for us to go that was marked). The forest was very steep with unsteady footing. Having my dog unleash was particularly difficult - - it was steep enough that we slid several times. We used our compass to point North toward the head of the trail, but it still felt disorienting to not see anything that looked like a trail for a long time. Thankfully, we ran into a couple and their pup who were also lost but had a better grip of how to get toward the trail head. (shout out to Alana, Troy and Ollie for helping us and keeping us calm). We even had to cross a stream to get back to the trail. Overall, it was a beautiful trail but the trail needs to be better marked at the end.

The Park is nice, well kept. The trees are fairly dense so on a hot/humid day like today, it provides some good cover. The M-M trail cuts through the park, and there's nothing tricky whatsoever about the trail.. no climbs, just a couple areas where the inclines could be described as steep. There's some old ruins up near the north end with a fire tower that is blocked off by a fence... someone of course pulled the fence back so the tower can be accessed... not that I would ever do that; I assume it's some great views. I'd summarize this as a good place for someone not looking for anything too consistently strenuous, but provides some work. Access to the park is $5 for MA residents; $10 for non-residents. You can access the M-M Trail outside the park off 141 - there's no loop however there are a series of trails you can drift around a little and arrive back to the M-M trail and get back to your vehicle... this is worth a 30-40 minute drive to get to if you want to stretch it out a bit... enjoy!

Great easy hike! Not much elevation change, which means you can save your energy for the swimming holes. The water is crystal clear and perfect to cool you down. Bring a backpack with a couple towels in it and you’ll be set. Gorgeous views if you’re willing to climb down the steep embankments off the main trail down to the water. The trail itself (which is more like a road most of the time) is clear and well maintained. It can get a little muddy here and there, but there’s always a way around. Follow the diamond KAB markers and you’ll stay right on track. I’ll definitely be going back to this one.

hiking
5 months ago

Love this trail! We started at Notch Visitor’s Center and went up to Mt Hitchcock before turning back. Lots of ups and downs, plus a tall staircase that seemingly appears out of nowhere. There are parts of the trail that seem almost enchanted. Bring plenty of water. Beautiful views.

We camped out near the third/fourth bridge, on the abandoned line that can now be walked across. it was a good day to go swimming and even in the evening the water was still quite warm. If you are planning to hike so far away from the parking lot, I would recommend bringing the smallest tent you can find. I brought my 4-person Coleman tent, but it got pretty heavy and we had to stop several times to rest. will definitely be picking up a smaller 2-person pop-up tent before making the trek again.

If you've reached the place to hike, take a trail. If you're here to see the falls, do that but really, going to the falls up the road is not really a trail hike. This place gets a fair amount of visitors and I'd say the majority have come to visit the water, not hike. So, if you visit and looking to hike, don't let the amount of people you might see discourage you. Most aren't climbing up the mountain to see the views. I went up the H.Newman Marsh Memorial trail today and saw 3 people (father/mother/son), that's it. There were many others but most just visited to get wet. The description about this trail is fairly accurate but it's not all blue blazes. It is a combination of green and blue. This is on the upper level of a "moderate" hike, almost what would be considered a "hard" one. It starts out as a steep incline and stays that way till the Memorial Trail part. It's probably a half hour to 45 minute hike on average to the split. Though the directions say to follow the brook, I kept wondering where this brook was because it's almost dried out at this time. Following the directions, I did the cross over the "brook" part and continued on. What you read in the directions above, it says look for the vistas signs but what you see first is the sign for the Memorial Trail. Being that this is a loop, I went left and then saw signs for the vistas. The first one was spectacular, amazing. The next two were OK. I know some have mentioned about overgrowth but it appears that they (for lack of a better term), mowed down this growth. You can see the vegetation/trees on the middle vista had been pushed over and appear dead. The markings all along my hike were fine, don't see where some got confused. I did the Memorial Trail loop and then went back down the way I came up. Going down can be just as tough as going up as you need to watch your step. One of my toughest climbs as of late but that first vista was worth it.

Load More